Shingles

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Shingles

  1. 1. SHINGLES HERPES ZOSTER ADA KONG, R.PH. SAFEWAY PHARMACY July 2007
  2. 2. WHAT IS SHINGLES?  Disease that causes severe pain & blisters on face and body.  Affects up to 1 million Americans every year.  Comes from chicken pox virus, called varicella zoster (or herpes zoster).  Chicken pox virus remains dormant in body until it is reactivated later on in life & develops into shingles.
  3. 3. HOW DO YOU GET SHINGLES?  Scientists don’t know how shingles gets reactivated from chicken pox virus.  Illness, trauma, stress are some factors that may contribute to cause.  People with weak immune systems (e.g. HIV patients, radiation treatment, surgery, chemotherapy) are more likely to get shingles.  More common in adults over 50 years old.
  4. 4. WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS? BURNING/SHOOTING PAIN RED RASH BLISTERS FLU-LIKE SYMPTOMS HEADACHE
  5. 5. COMPLICATIONS  Vision complications or blindness.  Hearing Loss  Loss of facial movement.  Inflammation of the brain (encephalitis) & neurological problems.  Bacterial infections.  Post-herpetic neuralgia = prolonged pain even after blisters have healed.
  6. 6. TREATMENT OF SHINGLES  Medications can help with pain & prevent complications with faster recovery.  Oral antiviral drugs (acyclovir, Valtrex, Famvir).  Pain medications & corticosteroids (for inflammation/swelling)  Tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants, lidocaine patches.
  7. 7. ZOSTAVAX (SHINGLES VACCINE)  Reduces risk of shingles outbreaks by about 50%, also reduces post-herpetic neuralgia.  For adults 60 years and older.  Live vaccine – must be healthy, not immunocompromised (no cancer, chemotherapy, steroid treatment etc.).  Side effects: redness, swelling, pain, rash at injection site. Headache, flu-like symptoms.  Covered by most Medicare D plans.
  8. 8. WHAT TO DO IF YOU GET SHINGLES  Call your doctor immediately – the sooner you get medications, the sooner you’ll get better!  Keep the affected area clean.  Apply cool compresses.  Soak in lukewarm water or calamine lotion.  Take OTC pain reliever (acetaminophen, ibuprofen) – Check with your pharmacist!  Get plenty of rest.
  9. 9. References  CDC website http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/shingles/dis-faqs.htm (Accessed July 2007)  Mayo Clinic http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/shingles/DS00098 (Accessed July 2007)  National Library of Medicine http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/shingles.html (Accessed July 2007)

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