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  • Food Safety Matters presentation - Information for presenters This slide provides important information on this presentation. To start the presentation without this slide: advance to the second slide then left mouse click on ‘View’ on the Toolbar, then left mouse click on ‘Slide Show’. To print the presentation without this information: In the print window (ie, select ‘File’ - ‘Print’), left mouse click on the check box ‘Print hidden slides’ until a tick does not appear in it. The presentation includes notes for presenters. These may be viewed in the ‘Notes Page’ view. To access the notes: left mouse click on ‘View’ on the Toolbar, then left mouse click on ‘Notes Page’. This presentation is based on the blackline masters for the overhead transparencies printed in the Food safety matters Teachers manual, pages 57-76. The blackline masters are in portrait format for photocopying onto overhead transparency plastic, while this presentation is set up for an on-screen PowerPoint presentation (ie, landscape format). If you wish to print and photocopy onto transparency film, better results will be obtained from the blackline masters in the teacher’s manual. The blackline masters also contain additional illustrations. Some points included on the blackline masters are not included on the PowerPoint slides, however, these are included as additional talking points in the ‘Notes View’ for the slides. This presentation and the blackline masters may be downloaded from www.foodsafetymatters.gov.au . Version 070104
  • Information on the use of this presentation is shown on the first slide (a hidden slide). Customise the presentation by adding your details to the first slide, eg. Name of teacher or trainer: Subject or course: Class name &/or year level: Date: (To add text: left mouse click on ‘Insert’ on the drop-down menu, then select ‘Text Box’, then left mouse click where you wish to insert the text box and drag the frame to the desired size, then type your text.) This presentation is based on the blackline masters for the overhead transparencies printed in the Food safety matters Teachers manual, pages 57-76.
  • Slide titles 1 Food poisoning 2 Types of food contamination 3 Chemicals 4 Natural toxins 5 Foreign matter 6 Organisms 7 Factors contributing to food poisoning outbreaks 8 The food poisoning time bomb 9 Strategies to prevent food poisoning 10 Keeping hands and nails clean 11 Washing hands and nails thoroughly 12 Transfer of micro-organisms by hands 13 Keeping the kitchen clean 14 Keeping the kitchen clean: Pest control and animals 15 Handling food safely 16 Cooking high-risk foods thoroughly 17 Keeping hot food hot and cold food cold 18 Keeping hot food hot 19 Keeping cold food cold 20 Summary
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.4 Additional points Food poisoning is easy to prevent.
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.4
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.4 Additional points Read the safety directions before using a chemical to identify how to use it safely Never put chemicals in food containers or drink bottles Always label chemicals clearly
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.4 Additional points Toxins form: in potatoes when they are exposed to light and turn green in fish and other seafood when they feed on algae or other fish that contain toxins.
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.4
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.5 Additional points Some micro-organisms are used to make foods such as yoghurt and bread. These micro-organisms are not harmful.
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.6-8 Additional points The main strategies to prevent food poisoning are: 1. ensure food does not become contaminated 2. kill or slow down the growth of micro-organisms.
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.6-8
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.10
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.10
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.11
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.12
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.12
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.14
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.14
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.16
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.16-17
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.16 Additional points Place hot food in the refrigerator once it has stopped steaming. Divide large quantities of food into small shallow containers for faster cooling. When reheating for use, heat as quickly as possible until steaming hot.
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.17
  • Refer to Food safety matters Student guide, p.8-9

Transcript

  • 1. Food safety mattersi.
  • 2. Presentation outline Food poisoning – what is it? Types of food contamination Factors contributing to food poisoning outbreaks Strategies to prevent food poisoningii. © Queensland Health
  • 3. Food poisoning Illness from consuming food that contains a harmful substance, harmful micro-organisms or their toxins. Approximately 5.4 million cases per year in Australia*. Common symptoms: – stomach aches – vomiting – diarrhoea – fever. Can result in long-term diseases and death. Often caused by food that looks, smells and tastes normal. *Based on research by OzFoodNet, released by the Australian1. Government Department of Health and Ageing in 2003. © Queensland Health
  • 4. Types of food contamination Food can be contaminated by: – chemicals – natural toxins – foreign matter – organisms.2. © Queensland Health
  • 5. Chemicals Chemicals in the home include those used: – to clean kitchen surfaces and equipment – as pesticides. Chemicals can be very harmful if they are: – spilt on or near food – mistaken for food or drink.3. © Queensland Health
  • 6. Natural toxins Toxins are poisonous substances produced by some micro-organisms, plants and animals. Most toxins that cause food poisoning are tasteless and remain dangerous when cooked.4. © Queensland Health
  • 7. Foreign matter Foreign matter can: – physically injure people – introduce harmful bacteria into food. Examples of foreign matter include: – dead insects – hair – jewellery – glass – pieces of metal.5. © Queensland Health
  • 8. Organisms The organisms that can make us sick include: – viruses – bacteria – parasites – mould. Micro-organisms such as viruses and bacteria are the most common causes of food poisoning.6. © Queensland Health
  • 9. Factors contributing to foodpoisoning outbreaks 1980 - 1995 Poor personal hygiene 9% Other 6% Unsafe food source 19% Inadequate cooking 27% Contaminated equipment 19% Temperature control 20% Source: Crerar, S.K. et al 19967. © Queensland Health
  • 10. The food poisoning time bomb8. © Queensland Health
  • 11. Strategies to prevent food poisoningTo ensure food does not become contaminated:1. Keep hands and nails clean2. Keep the kitchen clean3. Handle food safely.To kill or slow down the growth of microorganisms:4. Cook high-risk foods thoroughly5. Keep hot food hot and cold food cold.9. © Queensland Health
  • 12. Keeping hands and nails clean We need to:  wash hands and nails thoroughly with warm, running water and soap  dry hands thoroughly  cover cuts and infections on hands.10. © Queensland Health
  • 13. Washing hands and nails thoroughly with warm, running water and soapWe should wash our hands: before eating, preparing or handling food between handling raw meat, poultry and seafood, and handling cooked food or food that will be eaten raw after coughing and sneezing, using a handkerchief etc after going to the toilet after handling rubbish after touching animals after handling chemicals (e.g. cleaning products). 11. © Queensland Health
  • 14. Transfer of micro-organisms by hands12. © Queensland Health
  • 15. Keeping the kitchen cleanWhen cleaning plates and equipment, we need to: scrape and rinse off surface food wash in clean, soapy water rinse in clean water air dry where possible if drying immediately, use only a clean, dry towel.13. © Queensland Health
  • 16. Keeping the kitchen clean:Pest control and animalsWe need to: stop pests such as cockroaches and mice coming into the area where food is kept discourage pests by not leaving food or dirty dishes out on the benches keep animals out of the kitchen.14. © Queensland Health
  • 17. Handling food safelyWe need to: avoid preparing food when sick or feeling unwell keep raw meats, poultry and seafood separated from cooked food and food to be eaten raw protect food in the refrigerator by placing in covered containers or covering with plastic wrap use clean equipment, plates or containers to prevent contamination of cooked food (or food that will be eaten raw) with traces of raw food 15a. © Queensland Health
  • 18. Handling food safely (continued)We need to: use clean equipment, rather than hands, to pick up food wear clean clothes or a clean apron wash fruit and vegetables to be eaten raw under running water.15b. © Queensland Health
  • 19. Cooking high-risk foods thoroughlyWe need to cook thoroughly food such as: mince burger patties sausages rolled roasts stuffed meats rabbit seafood poultry.16. © Queensland Health
  • 20. Keeping hot food hot and cold food cold Bacteria die Avoid keeping food in the temperature Bacteriadanger zone of grow 5°C - 60°C Bacteria stop growing 17. © Queensland Health
  • 21. Keeping hot food hotAvoid keeping food in the temperature danger zone of 5°C - 60°C.We need to: keep cooked food at 60°C or above until served refrigerate or freeze food that is to be prepared well in advance and reheat until steaming hot before serving cook or reheat packaged food strictly in accordance with any directions on the label. 18. © Queensland Health
  • 22. Keeping cold food cold Avoid keeping food in the temperature danger zone of 5°C - 60°C.We need to: take cold groceries home to the refrigerator quickly as possible keep chilled and frozen food cold if it will be a long time before it can be placed in a refrigerator or freezer store cold food at 5°C or less keep cold food in the refrigerator as much as possible thaw frozen food in the refrigerator or microwave store and handle cold food according to any directions on the label check the temperature of the refrigerator regularly. 19. © Queensland Health
  • 23. Summary:Preventing food poisoning in the home We need to: 1. keep hands and nails clean 2. keep the kitchen clean 3. handle food safely 4. cook high-risk foods thoroughly 5. keep hot food hot and cold food cold.20. © Queensland Health