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Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations
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Hosting Inviting Introduction Guest Relations

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  • 1. Hosting , Inviting, Introduction 1 & Guest Relations Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 2. Ajay Kr. Dhamija (N-1) Anand A. Deshmukh (N-6) Deepak Gupta (N-16) Nitin Kumar (N-31) Nitin Sharma (N-33) Tripti Sonkar (N-55) Vijay kumar (N-57) 2 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 3. Introduction •Putting on the big event •Requesting people to the event •Introducing the guests •Entertaining the guests •Networking and Communications with guests •To forge business relationships and ultimately profits. 3 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 4. Agenda Business Event with purpose Planning and Budgeting Type of Occasions and Venue Guest Lists Invitations Attire Greeting the Guest Fabulous Food Guest introduction Office Parties Guest Etiquettes Summary 4 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 5. Putting on the big event Business events • An intimate soiree for 10 at your home • A workplace reception to showcase your new office space • A golf and tennis weekend tournament • A black-tie gala at an elegant hotel 5 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 6. Need to host a business event •Marketing a new product or service •Enhance the company’s image •Increased contacts , goodwill , additional sales •To introduce your clients to the new vice president Or, to celebrate the success of your business •Relationships -> Business -> Profits 6 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 7. Establish the purpose •Focus determines •the theme •the appropriate venue •guest list •budget 7 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 8. Creating the right package •Event can be as simple as a pitch-in or as complicated as a formal dinner for corporate titans •Your test as a gracious host is whether you plan in advance and whether you can deal with unexpected disasters •Planning is the key to success •Rehearse 8 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 9. Setting up the budget •Decide how much you can afford to spend •Have a feel for the scope of the event •Review your budget •Determine essential areas that cannot be compromised •Scale your event to a size that is financially manageable while enabling you to fulfill your business objectives 9 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 10. The Costs • Your budget will vary according to the kind of event, its locale and the venue you choose. • Rs 700 to Rs 1000 per person for home dinner parties • Rs 500 to Rs 700 per person for Office parties and cocktail parties given at home. • Hotels can vary in cost and offer several options tailored to suit any budget. • The disparity in the cost of hosting a business event at a hotel is as great as the distance between Montana and Manhattan • The costs will vary tremendously by state, city and venue 10 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 11. Budget - Tips Interview several suppliers to get a range of bids and to compare services Ask for written proposals which spell out all items and services that will be included in the vendor's fee Make certain all suppliers are clear on the concept of your event before you sign a contract for their services. The contract should define all services in writing and should be clearly understood by both you and the supplier. 11 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 12. You can't afford not to do it right Your budget should also include miscellaneous expenses –Postage, security, sales tax, tips, liability insurance and contingency funds for possible overtime expenses. If you don't have time to plan an event, try a party planner, special events or public relations firm Don’t forget to hire professional photographer for those memorable and candid shots Prepare an event checklist 12 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 13. Choosing the right venue Choosing the appropriate location is key. Venue for event will dictate the type of occasion it will be. The House Party The Hotel Suites The Office Party Entertaining Outdoors The Corporate Event 13 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 14. The House Party A cocktail party, buffet or sit- down dinner. Transforming clients and business associates into friends and business partners. Inexpensive –For as little as Rs 4000 for a four-course meal for six, including drinks and dessert –An alternative catering by a local gourmet restaurant. –Hiring a caterer, waiters, bartender and maid is the best option : you spend your time with clients. 14 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 15. The Hotel suites Although less personal, entertaining at a hotel requires less work for the host to prepare. A hotel account executive or in-house meeting planner is assigned to ensure that the event runs smoothly. 15 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 16. The Hotel suites - Tips location of hotel . The event locations within hotel. Arrange for an open bar and bartender Confirming each guest 16 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 17. More formal than The Office entertaining at—home or in a hotel. Party Gives clients and prospects a look at the inner workings of your operation. sales opportunity in the office. Company brochures and other informative marketing materials can be placed at strategic nerve centers. 17 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 18. The Office Party - Tips •No "theme" be adopted •Decorations •Light hors d'oeuvres •No finger foods . •Leverage the event for business opportunities . 18 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 19. A Day in the Sun •Full-service resort complex replete with swimming pools, health club and other amenities. •A more personal and gives informal dimension of the company and themselves to clients. 19 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 20. Entertaining Outdoors - Tips •Make a site inspection of all locations you are considering one year in advance. • Look at the site's outdoor facilities •Municipal permits required for event to be held in a public place 20 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 21. Entertaining Outdoors - Tips •Two months before sending out invitations, make another site inspection to ensure that the facilities are up to par. • Choose a weekday to host your outdoor event. •A rain date should be noted on the invitation in case inclement weather forces cancellation. 21 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 22. The Corporate Event •The major objectives –To make the public aware of a company's existence, a product or service –To enhance its image or extend goodwill in the community. •A corporate theme or supporting an issue : - recreational, educational. •Product exposure and corporate visibility are key 22 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 23. Corporate Events – Tips •Inviting the right people. - Developing the guest list and pairing guests •For a major affair invite all those who have contributed to your success. - Do not have competitors sitting at the same table when formalizing the seating assignments. 23 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 24. Further details •Know Something about your guests' interests, hobbies, family life or education before the event •It helps facilitate conversation and gives your guests a feeling of importance. 24 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 25. Inviting Guests •Guest List •It gets tricky when some people will be invited, but not everyone. •Try to make clear categories •Sales Force •Clients •Your Floor People •A ready and justifiable explanation for including some people while excluding others. 25 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 26. You are invited to … •It is essential that you send invitations. •Invitation should be visually attractive •Graphic design •Take the help of professional •It is crucial to stay on top of your replies. • This helps to keep an accurate count for menu planning , size of your venue etc. • In general, count on half the number of people you have invited to actually attend. 26 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 27. Issuing invitations •The way you word your invitations sets the tone for the affair . •Invitations to casual events can be creative and unusual •Those to formal affairs should follow protocol. • If there is a theme to the party, include it in the invitation. 27 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 28. Invitations basics • Invitation basics: who, what, where, why, when, and RSVP • How to let your host know whether or not you will attend. RSVP means respond either way, yes or no. Regrets only means the guest should contact the host only if not attending • For informal gathering of business associates, you can issue your invitations orally, either in person or by telephone – But make sure that you're clear about the date and time of the affair. 28 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 29. An illustration "We'd love to have you join us for an informal brunch with a few others from work at our house a week from Sunday. We plan to get together at 11 a.m., have brunch, and watch a holiday movie " – This invitation contains a lot of information that your guests will appreciate. – Your guests know how they need to dress and that others have been invited to the brunch. – They know that the meal will consist of more than chips and dip, and they know that you expect them to leave by 3 p.m. 29 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 30. Written invitations • If you are composing a written invitation, make sure that it has all the relevant information. • For written invitations to business events, use titles on the envelope: Mr., Mrs., Ms., or Dr. • Send Invitations well in advance. A month’s lead time is crucial to success. 30 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 31. Considering significant others and children • Always mention exactly whom you're inviting when you issue invitations. – For a married couple, mention both names. – For a single adult whom you expect to bring a date, call the person and tell them they can bring a guest if they'd like. – For couples who live together, both names go on the same line of the envelope. – Roommate names are listed on separate lines. 31 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 32. Considering significant others and children • Some people take their children everywhere – specifically mention on the invitation, children are not invited • Be very specific in the way you address your invitation – Make the envelope read Ms. Dorothy Kwan-Smith and Mr. Edward Smith rather than The Smiths. For business functions, Romeo, if Juliet isn't invited she isn't invited! Meet her under the balcony after the function. 32 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 33. Guest attire • A written invitation should specify how you expect your guests to dress. – If you want to see the gentlemen in tuxedos, write Black Tie – For suits and cocktail dresses, use the phrase Semi- Formal – For a reception after work at which you expect suits for all, use the phrase Business Dress – For slacks, sport coats, skirts or pants, use Business Casual – For jeans, write Casual 33 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 34. Fabulous Food • Represents the very essence of a party's success • Always sample the food before going to contract -- its taste and presentation • Best rule to follow the party cuisine is to "keep it simple!" • Choose a caterer who is versatile and has more than one style of cooking. • A caterer should have built-in capabilities to serve food and make arrangements for china, glasses, flatware, tables and chairs. 34 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 35. Variety , beauty & abundance • Appearances are key : Stay away from plastic and paper ware unless it is an informal picnic. • A variety of foods for vegetarian palates and the dietary restrictions of your guests. • Visually appealing and abundant. • When serving buffet-style, food can double as edible decorations. 35 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 36. The uninvited guest • Perhaps a relative showed up from out of town and it seemed rude for your guest to leave her at home alone. • Perhaps your cubicle mate shows up with his brand new girlfriend. • Just ignore your guest's breech of etiquette and warmly welcome any uninvited guest as if you were hoping for just such a visit. – Begin making introductions immediately. – Rearrange the seating with a shoehorn. – SMILE! After all, it's the holiday season. 36 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 37. Entertaining the Boss • Not all bosses are ultracasual, and for those who aren't, be prepared. • Some bombproof boss tips – Refrain from inviting your boss to your house until you've been invited to his or hers. – Invite other people with similar interests – Know your limits as an entertainer! – Unless your boss's children are also included, introduce your charming pajama-clad tykes and send them on their way – Wait to call your boss and your boss's companion by their first names until you've been asked to do so. 37 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 38. Greeting your guests •As your first guests arrive, greet them at the door. •Use their names, shake hands, look them in the eye, and tell them you're glad they could join you. • As the party progresses, you may have an associate or your spouse greet people. •Make sure that you're close by and that the person welcoming your guests knows where you are. •Introduce newcomers all around the room until the number of guests gets too large. 38 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 39. Greeting your guests • When that happens, introduce newcomers to the people closest at hand. • Keep an eye out for shy guests who plaster themselves to the wall. – Engage them in conversation and introduce them to someone who can draw them out. • Always have both alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages, including water. • Keep cocktail napkins close at hand or offer them with the drink. 39 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 40. Greeting your guests • Cocktails should be served for no more than an hour • Appetizers and snacks should be provided while serving alcoholic beverages. • Remember to serve the most senior guests first. 40 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 41. Gifts etiquettes • Accept the gift they brought graciously. • NEVER decline a gift, even if it’s a fruitcake and you hate fruitcake. • If the thank you gift is a horrendous picture – Smile, accept the gift and say something about it. Say it’s different, say it’s unique, but don’t say it’s horrendous. • Don’t let your kids say the gift is horrendous, either, and if they do, reprimand them. • There is no reason to be rude. 41 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 42. Running the meal • How you organize the meal depends – The number of guests – The atmosphere that you want to create. Provide adequate seating for everyone invited. 42 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 43. Running the meal – The Buffet •A buffet works for 10 guests or 100. • It is a great way to build camaraderie and allow people to mingle. • A buffet can be a bit formal or casual, depending on the seating arrangements and style of food. •Be sure to: –Set up the bar away from the hors d'oeuvre and the buffet table to avoid congestion. –Provide a drop-off table for cocktail glasses before the buffet. 43 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 44. Running the meal – The Buffet – Think about traffic flow. Make sure there's enough room for people to get to and away from the buffet table. – Set up glasses and dinner beverages on the dining tables so that people don't have to juggle food plates and drinks. – Organize menu items in standard menu order : main courses first and desserts last. – Have backup serving dishes. 44 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 45. The dinner party • A dinner party is a small affair, with usually no more than 12 guests. • Its business function is to provide a gracious climate in which to build relationships. • The conversation should be general, social, and witty. • The food should be prepared and served in courses : at least three, no more than five. • This is an opportunity to use your silver, your fine china, and your crystal. 45 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 46. The dinner party • If you don't have enough matching plates and silverware, mix and match • As the host, you are the leader. When the time comes, move toward the dining room : other guests will follow. • Take your seat right away as a sign that others should do the same. • As soon as all of the guests are seated, place your napkin in your lap. • This is the signal to others that the meal has begun. If you serve wine, offer a short toast. 46 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 47. The dinner party • When it comes to serving food and drinks, if you remember only these three things, you'll do fine: – Water glasses should be filled before your guests sit down at the table. – Guests are served from the left and dishes removed from the right, unless the arrangement of the tables and chairs does not allow it. – Make sure that all of the utensils for each course are on the table before the food arrives. 47 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 48. The dinner party • Make sure that the slowest guest has finished eating before you stand. • When you lead the way from the dining table, others will follow. • Try to engage every guest in at least a short personal conversation after the meal. 48 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 49. Ending the party • If you're guests are lingering too long, there's no need to rely on hints or subtlety. • Stand up, say, "This has been such a lovely evening," and begin thanking them for coming. • As guests begin to leave, station yourself at the door, accept their compliments, thank them for coming, wish them a good evening and offer a genuine welcome back. • Don't apologize for the roast being overdone : just say how pleased you were to have them at your party. • Take a note of Events and Follow–up later. 49 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 50. Hosting and Attending Office Parties • Useful for building morale and celebrating accomplishments. • The impetus for parties should be genuine and sincere. - Office parties should be given for a reason and be reasonably short. - Once or twice a year is plenty. 50 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 51. Occasions • Birthdays: – significant ones : the decade birthdays – A card signed by everyone in the office, and perhaps a gift, are in order. – Birthday gifts from boss to employee are always acceptable, but a birthday gift from a subordinate to a boss at the office is not advised. – A group card or group gift for a special birthday is better. 51 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 52. Occasions Weddings: •Colleagues, clients, and bosses get married. And you won't be invited to all the weddings. • •Unfair? Maybe, but not everyone shares everything with coworkers: •If you are invited, send a gift by all means. • But even if you're not invited, it's a nice gesture to organize an office gift for your fellow worker. 52 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 53. Occasions • Babies: – Touching a pregnant woman's stomach. – Asking a new parent detailed questions. – Demanding a play-by-play description of the delivery or subjecting others to every detail of your own experience is not appropriate.. Unless you and others are good friends with the person having the baby, group gifts are preferable to office baby showers. 53 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 54. Occasions • Retirement: – Everyone retires at some point. – Plan a retrospective of the person's time at the company : slides, anecdotes, and photographs – A group gift or a charitable donation is appropriate. – – Often, the retiree is also presented with a personal gift from the president or CEO. 54 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 55. Check with boss • To host an office party, send invitations out in the form of memos or e-mail if the party is in the office • Send real invitations if the party is to be outside of the office. • The invitation should include the reason for the party, where it's to be held, and its commencement time and duration. • Delegate the details of the party as you require, but guarantee a successful party by putting one person in charge to whom the others report. 55 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 56. Check with boss • If there are to be donations, designate one person to collect the money, and specify whether the money is to be used for a gift, refreshments, or both. • Try not to overburden your colleagues by asking for too much for office celebrations or by asking too frequently for contributions. • Try having an office kitty to which people contribute as much as they can when they can. • This helps provide a ready source of money for small employee gifts and helps prevent frequent requests for more money. 56 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 57. Hosting a restaurant gathering • If you're having the party at a local restaurant, then, as host, you are responsible for the reservations. • Make arrangements to pay the bill privately, so that no one else has the opportunity to dispute your generosity. On the day of the party, check with everyone early in the day for any last-minute business emergencies and do what is needed to take care of them 57 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 58. Hosting a restaurant gathering • As host, you are responsible for making sure that no one gets out of hand. • And look out for those habituated show-offs in every office who relish their time in the limelight. • If you sense that someone is trapped by one of these hams, intervene politely and ask the trapped person to accompany you on some errand. • Make sure, too, that no one drinks too much. 58 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 59. Being a guest • Stay sober and don't imbibe any illegal drugs. • And, even if everyone is feeling giddy, stay away from – displaying a little too much affection for your romantic partner or – that attractive new accountant you wish were your romantic partner or – making aggressive sexual advances to any of your colleagues. 59 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 60. Summary •Its presentation and •Special events are packaging can make the viewed like difference between success any other product or or failure. service. •With a powerful formula of ambience, food, entertainment and dramatic visuals -- against a solidly anchored budget and a well- oiled plan -- guests will be satisfied. •And you, the host, will have generated goodwill that can boost your professional and entrepreneurial stock and ultimately, your bottom line. 60 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 61. Thank You 61 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006
  • 62. 62 Hosting , Inviting , Introduction and Guest Relations September 23, 2006

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