ADavis ENVS 342 Presentation 2009
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ADavis ENVS 342 Presentation 2009

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Ecological Footprints and Developing Nations

Ecological Footprints and Developing Nations

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ADavis ENVS 342 Presentation 2009 ADavis ENVS 342 Presentation 2009 Presentation Transcript

  • Ecological Footprints and Hunger Addressing Consequences that Effect Both Our Environment and Humanity
  • Ecological Footprint
    • the overall resource consumption and waste assimilation of a population or economy
    • population needs include energy, fuel, food, water, shelter
    • everyone has an ecological footprint—we all use resources in order to ensure survival
    • composed of 5 segments:
      • Energy Land
      • Consumed Land
      • Farm Land
      • Forest Land
      • Water Area
    • A Basic Overview
  • Developed Nations
    • unlimited growth is not possible on a planet with finite resources
    • developed nations and “the city” concept
      • increased population = broader resource base required
      • those within the city are, in some part, blind
    • inequity between “independent” nations (developed nations) and those that are dependent (developing)
    • developed nations are not entirely self-sufficient
    • a plague of overconsumption
    View slide
  • Sample Study
    • United States citizen
    • 20 years old
    • consider myself an “environmentalist”
    • always recycle, carpool, buy mainly organic products, live in an apartment building
    • my ecological footprint: 3.2 planets
    • my results match those of most developing nations: energy footprint is greatest
    • map of the world according to footprints:
    • my personal ecological footprint
    View slide
  • Footprint Comparison
    • Saudi Arabia
      • 4.07 hectares/person
      • primary energy footprint
    • United States
      • 9.7 ha/person
      • energy/fossil fuels (CO2)
    • United Arab Emirates
      • 10.13 ha/person
      • energy
    • Mozambique
      • .47 ha/person
      • cropland
    • India
      • .77 ha/person
      • energy
    • Haiti
      • .82 ha/person
      • cropland
    • Developed Nations
    • Developing Nations
  • Impact on the Developing World
    • quality of life
      • resource distribution and equity
      • hunger
      • Pollution
    • quality of environment
      • pollution
      • sustainable agriculture
      • social conflict
    • lack of control due to both local governments and those of other nations (and accompanying economies)
  • Ethical Issues
    • “ Rights” Theory
      • protected privilege
      • encourages equity
    • “ Utilitarianism” Theory
      • greatest good for the greatest number of people
      • Equity in resource distribution
      • live in moderation for the health/equity of others
    • “ Justice” Principle
      • international fairness
    • “ Exemptionalism”
      • no limitations due to creativity, technology, ingenuity
  • What do we do?
    • stabilize human population size
    • create local solutions for sustainability that fit within the global view
    • have patience—it will take time to create a sustainable globe
    • create equity in resource distribution
      • primary cause of hunger
    • Preservation of land and environment—instill reasoning for future generations to take care of Earth and her people
    • how can we create sustainability?
  • Citations
    • Cajete, Gregory. A People’s Ecology. Santa Fe: Clear Light Publishers, 1999.
    • Cairns, John Jr. “Speculative Scenarios.” The Social Contract : Winter 2001: Pages 146-152.
      • scholarly article from Google Scholar
    • Dodds, Walter K. Humanity’s Footprint. New York: Columbia University Press, 2008.
    • Loh, Jonathan. “Living Planet Report 2002.” World Wildlife Fund. 2002: pages 1-39. http://iodeweb1.vliz.be
      • scholarly article from Google Scholar
    • Rees, William E. Our Ecological Footprint . BC Canada: New Society Publishers, 1996.