Dynamic Storytimes - Dynamic Children's Programming

723
-1

Published on

The Abilene Public Library in Abilene, Texas presents ideas and suggestions to aid in creating dynamic and fun storytimes including literacy aspects and further activities.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
723
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Dynamic Storytimes - Dynamic Children's Programming

  1. 1. DYNAMIC STORYTIMES Presented by Darla Casella Children’s Librarian Mockingbird Branch Library Dynamic Children’s Programming Workshop Abilene Public Library – www.abilenetx.com/apl March 17, 2014
  2. 2. STORYTIMES ARE ESSENTIAL! Attract children and adults  Create relationships between children and the library  Allow parents and caregivers to interact Get children excited about books and reading Encourage the development of essential pre-reading skills
  3. 3. DYNAMIC STORYTIMES: DEFINITION Imaginative storytimes that captivate audiences using practical, yet creative ideas.
  4. 4. KEYWORD FOR DYNAMIC STORYTIMES FLEXIBILITY
  5. 5. PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS FOR DYNAMIC STORYTIMES  Logistics  Elements  Structure  Literacy
  6. 6. STORYTIME LOGISTICS  Who?  What?  When?  Where?
  7. 7. STORYTIME ELEMENTS  Books  Music  Fingerplays  Rhymes  Puppets  Props  Crafts  Activities
  8. 8. STORYTIME STRUCTURE (EXAMPLE) 1. Opening Songs/Fingerplays/Rhymes  Generally the same every time 2. Story 3. Short Story 4. Movement 5. Story 6. Song or Game or Activity 7. Story 8. Ending Stand Up Songs  Generally the same every time *Should last about 30 minutes
  9. 9. LITERACY IN STORYTIMES Purpose Components Implementation
  10. 10. PURPOSE OF LITERACY IN STORYTIMES Provide literacy support for parents, caregivers, and schools Provide a foundation of the English language Provide pre-literacy skills before children go to school Provide parents/caregivers confidence and skills necessary for teaching their children
  11. 11. COMPONENTS OF PRE-LITERACY Vocabulary Building (I know words) Phonological Awareness (I hear words) Letter Knowledge (I know my ABCs) Print Motivation (I love books) Print Awareness (I see words) Narrative Skills (I tell stories)
  12. 12. IMPLEMENTING LITERACY INTO STORYTIMES Books Music Rhymes Fingerplays Initial sounds Clapping Rhythm
  13. 13. WHAT WORKS WELL: RHYMES AND FINGERPLAYS Tell-A-Story Nursery Rhyme Kit Five Monkeys Glove Puppet Set Three Little Speckled Frogs Whoops, Johnny!
  14. 14. WHAT WORKS WELL: INITIAL SOUNDS Letter of the Week Alphabet signs Fish cutouts Phonics books
  15. 15. WHAT WORKS WELL: PROPS AND BOOKS The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle  Storytelling Kit  Caterpillar/Butterfly Puppet Go Away, Big Green Monster by Ed Emberley  Storytelling Puppet  Storytelling Kit Owl Babies by Martin Waddell  Felt Board Storytelling Kit The Wide-Mouthed Frog by Keith Faulkner  Puppet
  16. 16. WHAT WORKS WELL: SONGS AND MUSIC The Wheels on the Bus and props Cows in the Kitchen and CD Five Fat Turkeys Are We Bells and songs (in handout) Homemade CD
  17. 17. RESOURCES Cobb, Jane. I’m A Little Teapot! Presenting Preschool Storytime. Vancouver: Black Sheep Press, 1996. Ghoting, Saroj Nadkarni and Pamela Martin-Diaz. Early Literacy Storytime @ Your library: partnering with caregivers for success. Chicago: American Library Association, 2006. Lincycomb, Kay. Storytime…Plus! New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc., 2004. Totten, Kathryn. Family Literacy Storytimes: readymade storytimes suitable for the whole family. New York: Neal- Schuman Publishers, Inc., 2004.

×