Early japanese painting styles

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Early japanese painting styles

  1. 1. Early JapanesePainting Styles
  2. 2. China, with its well developed culture, hadan enormous impact on the developmentof Japanese culture.
  3. 3. The earliest painting (of a high styleadmired by the ruling class) were found intombs. They were influenced by Chinesepainting style and Buddhism.
  4. 4. The first painting style of Japan was Kama-e, which means Chinese style painting. Itwas the painting of China’s T’ang Dynasty. Details from T’ang Dynasty paintings
  5. 5. Originally Kara-e referred to importedT’ang art only, but eventually Japan sentpainters to be trained in China, and Kara-ebegan to refer to T’ang style art producedin Japan. Painting by Chinese trained Japanese artist. Left—Saicho. Right—Kukai.
  6. 6. As Japan began to move away fromthe wholesale borrowing of China’sculture, a new Japanese painting styledeveloped, Yamato-e, which meansJapanese style painting.
  7. 7. Yamato-e is often very colorful withgold backgrounds. It depicts nature orscenes from literature. Scene from Talesof Genji
  8. 8. Yamato-e can come in the familiarChinese form of hand scrolls that are unrolled to be viewed.
  9. 9. Yamato-e more frequently comes inthe more uniquely Japanese form of hanging scrolls and screens Left—Parts of a hanging screen. Right—Hanging Scroll showing the Honshi, Ichimonji, and the Nakamawashi.
  10. 10. Yamato-e more frequently comes inthe more uniquely Japanese form of hanging scrolls and screens Six fold screen
  11. 11. How do I tell if a landscape is Chinese or Japanese?The Yamoto-e style becomes easier to distinguish from the painting styles ofChina; however, landscape paintings are still tricky to tell apart. Chinese Landscape Qualities to look for in a Chinese Landscape: • Usually only see a part at a time. • Wider because it is part of a long (horizontal) scroll • Attempt at portraying 3D (tries to show depth) • Smoky quality • Shading
  12. 12. How do I tell if a landscape is Chinese or Japanese? The Yamoto-e style becomes easier to distinguish from the painting styles of China; however, landscape paintings are still tricky to tell apart.Qualities to look for in a Japanese Landscape: Japanese• Longer vertically because it is part of a Landscapes hanging scroll or a pane of a tall screen.• Stronger lines• Less emphasis on realistic portrayal• Flatter, less emphasis on 3D• Depicts Japanese architecture.

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