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HCDI Motivation by Fergus Bisset Presentation Transcript

  • 1. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Hello and Welcome! Towards a convergent model of motivation in the design [A WORK IN PROGRESS] Fergus Bisset design research
  • 2. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Who am I? A design researcher in the School of Engineering and Design, here at Brunel.
  • 3. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 What am I doing? Working with Mark Young on the Public Engagement Exhibition http://www.realdesign.org http://designmuseum.org/exhibitions/2009/2009-ergonomics-real-design http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/8363862.stm
  • 4. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 And in my spare time! Completing a MPhil in Design Research in the School of Engineering and Design exploring: ‘Intrinsically Motivating Design’
  • 5. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 What is design research? “to seek to make explicit the ideas and methods that are otherwise implicit in design practice, design education and design studies.” (Carnegie Mellon University, 2007)
  • 6. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Which in practice means... “The development of a concept map, or framework that seeks to visualise the role of motivation within the design and use of products, systems and services.”
  • 7. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Why motivation? “Motivation is the energisation and direction of human behaviour” (Reeve, 2005)
  • 8. Energisation
  • 9. Direction
  • 10. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Why motivation? As designers how can we better understand the energisation and direction of users? Or encourage users to understand what energises and directs themselves?
  • 11. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 What energises and The Slide Heading directs this behaviour? The Slide Content
  • 12. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Is it different from The Slide Heading what energises & directs this behaviour? The Slide Content
  • 13. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 This insight will hopefully will enable designers... To design more motivating and engaging products, systems and services for everyone. But how does this relate to the aims of design research?
  • 14. ‘Design Thinking - The Next Competitive Advantage’ (Martin, 2009) INTUITIVE ANALYTIC THINKING THINKING INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC PROCESSES PROCESSES 100% 100% VALIDITY RELIABILITY DESIGN THINKING http://www.aiga.org/content.cfm/video-makethink-2009-martin
  • 15. “intrinsic motivation largely escapes the traditionally object-centred scienti c research methods.” (Krippendorf, 2004) THEORETICAL EMPIRICAL INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC PROCESSES PROCESSES 100% 100% VALIDITY RELIABILITY DESIGN THINKING
  • 16. “design thinking is about the creation of choices” (Brown, 2009) THEORIES / PRODUCTS / IDEAS ARTEFACTS INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ 100% 100% VALIDITY RELIABILITY DESIGN THINKING
  • 17. INDIVIDUAL It’s also about being able to scale your design thinking... THEORIES PRODUCTS INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ SOCIETY
  • 18. INDIVIDUAL Martin’s “Knowledge Funnel” MYSTERY THEORIES PRODUCTS HEURISTIC INTRINSIC ALGORITHM EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ SOCIETY
  • 19. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Suri-IDEO Design Synthesis Model http://www.dubberly.com/articles/interactions-the-analysis-synthesis-bridge-model.html
  • 20. of frames + metaphors drawing on a repertoire with experience + values hrough conversations These models suggest a tidy, linear structure a feedback loop. Several levels of loops may be nested: d it frames the situation—or selects a metaphor to explain it— onsiders experience and values. ch must then be shared with other people. ection begins as a conversation with oneself. beginning middle end - a listing of assumptions and a first approximation of a solution - a primary process for refining the solution Simple sequences sound manageable, even predictable. - a process for agreeing on the goal of the primary process They promise tasks we can schedule and budget. That makes - a process for improving the process of agreeing on the goal HCDI SEMINAR - 8 DECEMBERThis “boot-strapping” process (Engelbart, 1962) is a sign of 2009 TH them appealing to people who run organizations and worry about minimizing uncertainty and risk. But the creative process resists planning; it’s not a recipe, script, or formula. (How could it be?) learning systems and organizations (Argyis + Schön, 1978). In practice, the process is messy, iterative, and recursive. Concept Mapping... The creative process is not just iterative; it’s also recursive. Framed as a sequence, it’s a plan for achieving a goal It plays out “in the large” and “in the small”—in defining the ready aim fire broadest goals and concepts and refining the smallest details. It branches like a tree, and each choice has ramifications, Yet a first shot doesn’t always hit the target. Achieving a goal which may not be known in advance. Recursion also suggests may require a few tries; it may require iteration. Iteration is a a procedure that “calls” or includes itself. Many engineers looping process, using feedback from earlier attempts to define the design process as a recursive function: converge on a goal. Iteration enables participants to calibrate, discover define design develop deploy correct mistakes, build on accidents, add and remove detail, and improve skills through practice. The creative process involves many conversations—about goals and actions to achieve them—conversations with The creative process is less like a line and more like a loop: co-creators and colleagues, conversations with oneself. observe reflect make observe reflect make ... The participants and their language, experience, and values affect the conversations. The process need not begin with observing; it may begin with any step. Boundaries between the steps are not rigid. Conversations about wicked problems especially benefit from— Each activity continues throughout the process, e.g., and may require—a variety of views. Some of these views making also involves reflecting and observing. form a habit of engaging (or observing, reflecting, and making) observe reflect make observe reflect make often called “design thinking.” It might be thought of more observe reflect make observe reflect make accurately as a set of lenses on design conversations observe reflect make observe reflect make or creative conversations. These lenses provide perspective beyond the immediate focus of the conversation or process: If the goal is clear—if we have agreed on how we define a - attention - understanding - searching problem, as in a math problem—then solutions may be implied. - openness - integration - envisioning And we know when to stop. If the goal is less clear, deciding when to stop requires judgment. The quality of the conversations is largely responsible for the outcome of the process. The quality of the resulting product But some problems are “wicked” (Rittel, 1969). Their definition reflects the quality of the creative process—and the curiosity depends on point of view; participants can always broaden and determination of the participants. or deepen their understanding and improve their solutions. to understand For such problems, starting and stopping are arbitrary and “By showing everything—the forest and the trees—in a single view, external to the process. It ends only when we “run out of time, money, or patience” (energy, will, or gumption). what people want how culture is evolving exp to integrate The concepttory lor maps help people create mental models and clarify The goal Ge main is to b res ner ativ task o uild a ear a by seeing patterns by building consensus e re f g sha sea ene red rch rativ und inte e re ers res gen earc rse sea tand ch Exp cts rch ing The lorato ref reflect lec is to c of the The main ry re thoughts.” ting om d + m e up esire At goal task earc f s as irst, th is to b of exp h inte wo e c uild lora rsec era h aki d ng. with i situa dea tion exp rk s. . p ur a to ts tive rea lorato roce rent s shar ry re obse ct t e i e s r o n ry res ds an tuatio d und earch ving + ew ear d t n m ers ly c ch he t is to refl bou a rea ma proc y be andin “ma ectin ted y al e n g p g. ins art so i ss ite ew; of the the te ifac nvo rat cur rrai cha nda ts o lve es, ren n.” r “d obs esi erv gn i pro ng ho t si tua tion . def ights ma rac ries bes w c .” ons titu ent s cri initi + c ps ters + is ter ons onc “We create concept maps to share understanding” + m + su ia + + ep ode stor es goa hypo ts ls ies ls the ses http://www.dubberly.com/concept-maps implement illuminate incubate prepare iterate rve e se k ess Some steps essential to the creative In the middle, the process as sequence Once an idea has been hatched and refined, b process lie outside its core. may take a detour and iterate in a loop. a it must still make its way into the world. Communicating the idea to others enn tion o Accepting responsibility for the task Many creative people have said and building consensus for adoption and preparing tend to be one-time, that their best ideas came (illumination) are part of the innovation process upfront tasks. after putting aside a problem and m but may lie outside the core creative process. es letting it incubate. ltur p n Passing on responsibility to others— rnin cu leaving a legacy— ho lea le + ss exp ginin tte min gy ima lne g is the final step in the larger process. g + peop lain g t + ener ireframes dfu to ing the fu eni er spe n + wh ture list oth a tak rking h re ssio wit at i n wo m c ketches ing qui wit pa fro env t m and m to s adv ckly ith ting buting igh ant + otypes t m aking s y ac tri a ons tuent ” ean it t ge iterat ow emor con w of a ing isio e i cci e fl e m sat sti ang den arc ible ts r h . ers self . in t cl ls n oth one ves ith vol ion w h ly in at
  • 21. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Concept Mapping... To help visualise my background research and develop a intrinsic motivation heuristic Indicating its relationship with established models of the design and use of products, systems and services.
  • 22. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Concept Mapping... Put another way... A framework to help illustrate and communicate the otherwise ‘intangible’ value of intrinsic motivation.
  • 23. INDIVIDUAL “Explaining human behavior in all its complexity is a di cult task. It can be approached at many levels, from concern with physiological processes at one extreme to concentration on social institutions at the other.” (Ajzen, 1991) SOCIETY
  • 24. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY SENSATION “Social and personality psychologists have tended to focus on...the fully functioning individual whose processing of available information mediates the e ects of biological and RELATEDNESS environmental factors on behavior.” (Ajzen, 1991) COGNITION INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ ORGANISATION COMPETENCE SOCIETY
  • 25. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY SENSATION Indeed designers too have tended to focus on these same fully functioning individuals “whose processing of available information mediates the RELATEDNESS e ects of biological and environmental factors on behavior.” COGNITION INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ ORGANISATION COMPETENCE SOCIETY
  • 26. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY Product SENSATION Design Interaction Design RELATEDNESS COGNITION INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ Social / Service / ‘DEMANDS’ Participatory Design ORGANISATION COMPETENCE SOCIETY
  • 27. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY SENSATION Ergonomists, long proponents of ‘human centred design’ and who seek to “understand and support the role of the human in complex socio-technical systems” have also adopted this model: RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ ORGANISATIONAL COMPETENCE SOCIETY (IEA, 2009)
  • 28. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY SENSORY And even design disciplines that have specialised in or grown up in support of more ‘universal’ approaches such as Inclusive Design, have also adopted this ‘extrinsic perspective’. RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY (Coleman, 2007)
  • 29. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY SENSORY The exception to this might well be the Scandinavian Participatory Perspective RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY Scandinavian Participatory Approaches (Ehn, 1988 in Holmlid, 2009)
  • 30. Design-Led Generative Design Research Critical Design Cultural Design + Emotion Generative Probes Tools User-Centered Design Participatory Expert Mindset Design Participatory Mindset “users” seen as subjects “users” seen as partners Contexual (reactive informers) (active co-creators) Inquiry Usability Testing Lead-User “Scandinavian” Innovation Methods Human Factors + Ergonomics Applied Ethnography Research-Led An Evolving Map of Design Practice and Research (Sanders, 2008) http://www.dubberly.com/articles/an-evolving-map-of-design-practice-and-design-research.html
  • 31. PHYSICAL Physiological Needs AUTONOMY SENSORY Safety In my research I’m interested in building an integrated framework that incorporates these ways of thinking. As the old saying goes if you want to RELATEDNESS Belonging increase participation and cooperation, build bridges, not more islands. COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ Esteem Needs COMPETENCE Self Actualisation ORGANISATION SOCIETY Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs (Maslow, 1943)
  • 32. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Perhaps its little wonder... “the study of crippled, stunted, immature, and unhealthy specimens can yield only a cripple psychology and a cripple philosophy.” (Maslow, 1954)
  • 33. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 The Slide Heading The Slide Content
  • 34. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Types of Systems http://www.dubberly.com/articles/what-is-interaction.html
  • 35. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY SENSORY SELF ACTUALISATION PHYSIOLOGY SOCIAL RECOGNITION RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC SAFETY ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ SOCIAL RELATIONS COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY Closed Loop Model of Human Needs (Trendbüro, 2007) http://www.slideshare.net/TrendBuero/identity-management-manifesto-presentation
  • 36. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY SENSORY SELF ACTUALISATION/ PHYSIOLOGY CREATIVITY SOCIAL RECOGNITION RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC SAFETY ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ SOCIAL RELATIONS COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY Closed Loop Model of Human Needs (Trendbüro, 2007) http://www.slideshare.net/TrendBuero/identity-management-manifesto-presentation
  • 37. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Types of Systems http://www.dubberly.com/articles/what-is-interaction.html
  • 38. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY SENSORY Hedonism RELATEDNESS “Approach and Avoidance” COGNITIVE INTRINSIC “Pinball User” EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY Motivation as Self Interest - (Thrasymachus, 4BC)
  • 39. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY SENSORY Motivation as a Judgement “people will do the right thing as RELATEDNESS long as they could agree what it is” COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY (Socrates, 4BC)
  • 40. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY SENSORY RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY Leviathan - (Hobbes, 1647)
  • 41. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Types of Systems http://www.dubberly.com/articles/what-is-interaction.html
  • 42. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY SENSORY Concept of Causality RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY Kant - (Kant, 1647)
  • 43. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Types of Systems http://www.dubberly.com/articles/what-is-interaction.html
  • 44. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY SENSORY (Self Re ection, Independence, Empowerment) RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY Self Determination Theory (Deci and Ryan, 1985, 2000, 2004)
  • 45. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY SENSORY (Socialisation, Care and Concern for and from others) RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY Self Determination Theory (Deci and Ryan, 1985, 2000, 2004)
  • 46. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY SENSORY RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ (Feelings of e cacy, self control and accomplishment) ORGANISATION COMPETENCE SOCIETY Self Determination Theory (Deci and Ryan, 1985, 2000, 2004)
  • 47. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 What energises and The Slide Heading directs this behaviour? The Slide Content
  • 48. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Is it different from The Slide Heading what energises & directs this behaviour? The Slide Content
  • 49. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY SENSORY In my research I’m interested in building an integrated framework that incorporates established ways of thinking and exposes the intrinsic facets of human behaviour within them. RELATEDNESS As the old saying goes if you want to COGNITIVE INTRINSIC increase understanding, build bridges, EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ not more islands. ‘DEMANDS’ COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY
  • 50. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Proof if that... “If you want new ideas, read old books.” Ivan Pavlov
  • 51. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY Existential Needs SENSORY Relatedness Needs RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ Growth Needs COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY ERG Theory (Aldefer, 1972)
  • 52. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY Physical SENSORY Social RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ Cultural COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY Situated Cognition (Seely-Brown, 1989)
  • 53. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY SENSORY SKILL RULE RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ KNOWLEDGE ‘DEMANDS’ COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY SRK Framework, (Rasmussen, 1990)
  • 54. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY A ective SENSORY Cognitive RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ Behavioural COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY Hierarchical Model of Intrinsic Motivation (Valerand, 2001)
  • 55. PHYSICAL Anthropometry AUTONOMY SENSORY Physiology Psychology RELATEDNESS Sociology COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ Anthropology Ecology COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY Hierarchy of Complexity (Moggeridge, 2007)
  • 56. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY Product SENSORY Design Interaction RELATEDNESS Design COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ Social / ‘DEMANDS’ Participatory Design COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY
  • 57. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY Useful? SENSORY Usable? RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ Sociable? COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY
  • 58. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 So how have I been using this? To make things more: - useful? - usable? - sociable? by consequence... - more sustainable? - more intrinsically motivating - possess more ‘intrinsic’ value
  • 59. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Physiological Blueprinting In the same way athlete’s monitor their physiology to sustain their performance - I’ve been exploring how this understanding of physiology could be integrated into to the design of public services...
  • 60. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 The data... Can this sort of data then be embedded in service blueprints and customer journey maps to indicate not only the actions and (extrinsic) system processes but also the user (intrinsic) regulatory and affective responses throughout the customer journey.
  • 61. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 An example of a service blueprint... http://www.flickr.com/photos/brandonschauer/3363169836/sizes/o/
  • 62. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 An example of a service blueprint... PHYSICAL AUTONOMY Useful? SENSORY Usable? RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ Sociable? COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY http://www.flickr.com/photos/brandonschauer/3363169836/sizes/o/
  • 63. Correct side-dish prepared meals pushed late in order Chef agitated and other HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 to re-do side-dish. failure in kitchen Great work on this by Andy Polaine at Luzern... Communication Meal Prepared Role 3 Cook Media- Touchpoint Role 4 Manager Media- Touchpoint + Fail Line – + Emotions – + Costs – http://www.service-design-network.org/sites/default/files/media/Andy%20Polaine.pdf +
  • 64. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 My trip to Sainsburys supermarket
  • 65. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Can also be mapped like this: or s ical Phy poral Tem ess of t c n Pro geme a Eng er stom Cu ns Act / io ra ctiv ity INT ERA CT ION Service Blueprints Inte EO F LIN ge O nsta / ble Visi acts IB ILIT Y f VIS Arte EO F LIN sta ge Back N ACTIO / ible INTER I nvis ns ERN AL io INT Act EO F LIN ort S upp sses ce Pro
  • 66. And in the case of this research... HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Looking at a user’s physiological response...
  • 67. And in the case of this research... HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Autonomous Nervous Regulation.... HF LF HF LF LF HF
  • 68. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Underlying physiological basis of motivation... This is definitely at the ‘intuitive’ end of of the design research spectrum at the moment... And it is an attempt to map the underlying (regulatory) motivational processes of the user as they interact with services. But the framework can also act as a lens to analyse more established products and services...
  • 69. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY Useful? SENSORY Usable? RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ Sociable? COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY
  • 70. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 The Slide Heading The Slide Content
  • 71. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 The Slide Heading The Slide Content
  • 72. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 The Slide Heading The Slide Content
  • 73. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 How could the exhibition be made more motivating and engaging? PHYSICAL AUTONOMY Useful? SENSORY Usable? RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ Sociable? COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY
  • 74. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Is an exhibition the best way to engage people with Ergonomics? How about an Ergonomics app? “foursquare for Ergonomics engagement?” - a mobile app that alerted you to everyday examples of Ergonomics?
  • 75. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 The Slide Heading The Slide Content
  • 76. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 If you want to find out more about... Adding game theory (and social connectedness) to everyday life http://www.mobilemonday.nl/talks/dennis-crowley-foursquare/
  • 77. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 The Slide Heading http://www.horsepowergame.com/hpc2/#game http://www.tellart.com/#horsepower-challenge
  • 78. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY Useful? SENSORY Usable? RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ Sociable? COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY
  • 79. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 The Slide Heading The Slide Content
  • 80. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY Useful? SENSORY Usable? RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ Sociable? COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY
  • 81. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 The Slide Heading http://service.engagement.ac
  • 82. http://service.engagement.ac
  • 83. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY Useful? SENSORY Usable? RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ Sociable? COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY
  • 84. https://uservoice.com/
  • 85. PHYSICAL AUTONOMY Useful? SENSORY Usable? RELATEDNESS COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ ‘DEMANDS’ Sociable? COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY
  • 86. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 The Slide Heading The Slide Content 350 million members (3rd biggest global population)
  • 87. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 So to summarise... Motivation is a dynamic (reciprocal) process that is at the root of all human behaviour. Thus as designers if we seek to change behaviour we are dealing with motivation, whether we embrace it or not.
  • 88. Motivational Design Personas with Internally Regulated and Empowered States v0.1 HCDI SEMINAR - 8 DECEMBER 2009 TH by Fergus Bisset (2009), based on work by Ryan and Deci (2000) This diagram is intended as a tool to help visualise the role of Everyone is motivated to some extent... motivation in determining stakeholders attitudes towards and empowerment within a product or service environment. “I love doing this “I’m only doing “I’d feel guilty if I “I think it’s “Doing this is a “I don’t know and and being this because I didn’t do this important to do really important I don’t care...” immersed in the have to...” properly...” this because...” to me...” process...” Why? How? “I really like “Decisions are “Someone else “I can go ask the “I’ll help you “Helping people is helping people to nothing to do with makes the person who makes even though it’s a really important...” enjoy the me...” decisions...” the decisions...” problem with the experience as system...” much as I do...” Amotivation Extrinsic Motivation Intrinsic Motivation Stakeholders View of the Service Systematic Empathetic Stakeholders Engagement Within the Service Analytic Synthetic
  • 89. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 So to summarise... Motivation research (and the world) has moved on a lot since Maslow. And the opportunities for integrating elements of motivational design are increasing exponentially with new technologies and sensors...
  • 90. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 But it is a work in progress... PHYSICAL AUTONOMY Product SENSORY Design Interaction RELATEDNESS Design COGNITIVE INTRINSIC EXTRINSIC ‘NEEDS’ Social / ‘DEMANDS’ Participatory Design COMPETENCE ORGANISATION SOCIETY
  • 91. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Thank you very much! What do you think? email: fergus.bisset@brunel.ac.uk blog: http://www.fergusbisset.com/blog design twitter: http://twitter.com/fergusbisset research friendfeed: http://friendfeed.com/ferg
  • 92. HCDI SEMINAR - 8TH DECEMBER 2009 Further Relevant Links... My Blog http://www.fergusbisset.com/blog Motivational Design - From an Italian Research Group http://www.slideshare.net/Gian/mode-motivational-design-motivational- hooks-2290190 Social Usability - From an Italian Research Group http://www.slideshare.net/Gian/social-usability-mode