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Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
Think green save money -  Kinnarps
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Think green save money - Kinnarps

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Reducing environmental Impact through space planning and flexibility

Reducing environmental Impact through space planning and flexibility

Published in: Design, Business, Technology
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  • Introduce Kinnarps Manufacturer of ergonomic work furniture Family owned since 1943 Largest in Scandinavia, 3 rd or 5 th in Europe € 300 million turnover
  • … . And this is Jaarl
  • Caters for a wide range of work styles across Europe Different countries use office space in very different ways Respond to cultural variations whilst remaining true to principals In house product development with external design consultants from across Europe Places user at centre of all product development In Sweden the wellbeing of workers has traditionally had much importance placed on it. Understands the impact of demographic shifts and the importance of designing products that include users of all abilities. Product development is routed in detailed research
  • Strong emphasis on sustainability and ergonomics – even by Scandinavian standards Sustainability is seen as ‘what makes sense’ – often in an economic sense Has evolved in an agricultural community and has a similar attitude of stewardship of the land Carbon neutral long before it became fashionable! Suspicious of carbon offsetting – why pollute in the first place?
  • These are the topics n the think green save money website that will be covered in the seminar
  • Its admirable that more and more products have a higher recycled content, are recyclable, have lower carbon foot prints and generally imact the environment in a less negative way than they have in the past. We are much more aware of where products come from and where they will go at the end of their life, but if didn’t really need the in the first place we have failed in reducing our environmental impact. It’s a bit like having an exceptionally fuel efficient car but making unnecessary journeys. Office space is no different. It consumes energy in its creation, furnishing and maintenance. So to reduce the amount of space per capita we need to undersatnd what the office needs to do to support workers day to day activities and needs
  • First, its good to look at what may prede=ict the futi=ure workplace will be like and in some cases, already is. There are plenty of commentators with ideas on this subject - and this is a separate subject in itself. These are some of the topics being discussed Older workforce More inclusive workplace Environmental issues just part of everyday life Blurred boundaries between corporate and personal life Flexible or Tele-working more prevalent VoIP will mean the phone will disappear from desks Younger generation with different skills and aspirations “X-box generation” This graphic is from a book called ‘space to work’ by Jeremy Myerson and Phillip Ross and describes the different environments in which people work HOWEVER This is all very useful BUT too much future gazing can cause one to ignore the real issues of our own organisation. So the first task is to look at the way we work now. Don’t jump on the bandwagon..
  • Look at your existing facility and ask: Does this support our current corporate strategy? Does this reflect our team layouts? Was it created with our current technology in mind? Images shown are the ‘before ‘ photos from Phillips where we did an occupancy study. They had a feeling that their offices weren’t very efficient and asked us to look at it….
  • We manually observed and recorded staff occupancy and movements using third party data recorders. This information was collated and analyzed From this we can see tangible waste – Which led to a proposal of a 50:50 split of fixed and shared desking and a substantial cost savin Add if necessary: During a recent meeting between five Philips personnel and Kinnarps at our Heathrow offices, a discussion took place based on a study and space analysis recently conducted at BAA. Our brief was to replicate the study covering both Croydon and Ashford sites. What follows is an overview of our observations, a recommendation for improvement and a summary of cost implications
  • A similar project was undertaken recently across all Virgin sites which enabled them to reduce their estate, again huge cost savings were made.
  • Further example of flexible working London borough of Ealing, teams are grouped as 8:5, 9:4 13:8 etc, where 13 people use 8 desks. The area is planned in a way that allows these ratios to change as staff and roles change Beak out areas a located centrally to 4 wings of open plan desking.
  • Using the department by location data to define the key areas of communication. Thick lines denote where teams should be adjacent, thin line where it is desirable but not necessary. These would then be put onto an existing plan. Team locations are moved to reflect their current locations. From this we can see where poor communication could occur, and where unnecessary proximities exist. Noise levels generated by different types of work are also plotted onto the diagrams
  • This is a similar example from HP that reflects the next stage which is to start thinking about the spaces that the different functions occupy, and also access routes
  • The resulting plan was produced using the block plan as guidance… Note that this installation uses corner workstations which, for this client, were the right thing to use.
  • The resulting installation was one that the client was exceptionally pleased with, and one that we were particularly proud of. Being able to add value to key accounts by working closely with the client is a way in which we believe we have strengthened the relationship between the Kinnarps group and one of its largest global customers.
  • In the same way we looked at use of space desking – need to do storage in same way If we’re going to cut building in half – storage is a significant factor in this The key is a through approach to the questioning, including : How many people regularly access the filing systems? What percentage of your filing is Personal use; team use; archive? How many, and in what format do you file? How many new files do you create per annum? How long do you have to keep files? Do they really need all their current files? Are you looking to reduce storage?
  • In many cases a large desk is used to store things. In this picture the user has a very small working area
  • Here are examples of where possible improvements were identified in storage provision. It was observed that employees used worktops for storage, rendering much of their usable workspace redundant. By freeing up the space under the monitor (using a monitor arm) and introducing other storage alternatives it was possible to reduce the worktop dimensions. MORE WORKING SPACE AND LOWER FOOTPRINT
  • In order to define a future standard workstation footprint it is often necessary to fully understand what has been used previously. This page shows extracts from a comparison of new work settings on a clients existing 1800 x 1800 desks. This helped address employees concerns regarding the move to a smaller footprint. For example, the shapes we considered in comparison with existing desks Ergonomically, leading edge dimensions are considered and improved on. The 1800x1800 foot print uses far mor space in the space plan than the other settings shown, with no tangible benifit
  • Having thought about what style of working will suit individuals we now look at haw different footprints work within a building Two popular contrasting approaches are the 120 degree and bench format
  • The 120 degree workstation is ideal for planning teamwork solutions where group sizes are varied and flexible. The non-handed footprint makes planning easy and ensures suitability for permanent and temporary members of the team and for placement of their technology. Group configurations can also be expanded or reduced in size simply via the modular design.
  • Rectangular and bench configurations give highly efficient space plans and a clean geometric interior. Flat screen technology and laptop use have made this style particularly popular.
  • A more traditional cubicle layout, still popular with call centres
  • Benching allows blurred boundaries between users
  • A depth of 600mm give a more useful working area and a longer leading edge. This is also more economical than a multi piece top
  • 120 deg ws give an organic feel to the work place and encourage team working. They can also give very efficient space planning densities – here they have been compared to a 1600x1600 corner workstation
  • Now we look at how different space planning approached work differently in different buildings…
  • RSA Glasgow – Delta tops give a more efficient layout
  • In Sunderland Rectangular tops give a better layout. This goes to show that there is no easy answer – it will depend on the building and way in which the building is planned as to what the best footprint will be
  • Having made savings in our office space, we need not ‘cash – in’ all these savings – rather it may well be desirable to give something back to the staff, by giving them improved breakout and meeting facilities. Areas like this may also be the logical conclusion of a worplace analysis, whereby its found that, for instance , staff are dropping in for an hour or two and so just need small touchdown desks as shown
  • These areas can be vibrant and energising, whilst also allowing a break from a busy, denser open plan space This can be a invaluable tool in getting staff buy in and greatly enhance the quality of the workplace
  • The best environmental option is not always the most obvious. Every scenario will have arguments and counter arguments There is no ‘one size fits all’ Example cotton industry: Obvious to make t shirts locally and make them last But: Shipping refined goods rather than raw cotton is more efficient A garments greatest environmental impact is in it’s wear cycle – ie. Being washed Cotton industry sustains developing economically in sound and ethical way Tele working: Seems obvious that by avoiding a commute you’re saving energy, but…. You need to light and heat/cool your home – the amount of energy per capita will be higher here If you were to use public transport the energy per capita would be small On the other hand if you were to be driving a jag from Henley to the city every day…..
  • Transcript

    • 1. An introduction to Kinnarps
    • 2.  
    • 3.  
    • 4.
      • Manufacturer of ergonomic work furniture
      • Producer of furniture for offices, education and care.
      • Family owned since 1943
      • Largest in Scandinavia, 3 rd or 5 th in Europe
      • € 300 million turnover
    • 5. Design Philosophy
        • Affordable ergonomics
        • Places user at centre of all product development
        • Lower cost of well designed ergonomic solutions
        • Reduce costs that don’t add to the product
          • Logistics
          • In sourcing
          • Materials
          • Economies of scale
      Design Philosophy
    • 6. Culture
      • Strong emphasis on sustainability and ergonomics – even by Scandinavian standards
        • Sustainability is seen as ‘what makes sense’
        • Has evolved in an agricultural community and has a similar attitude of stewardship of the land
    • 7. Reducing environmental Impact through space planning and flexibility
    • 8. Space planning & ergonomics
      • Space is expensive; whether you use it to meet in, to store in or to work in. Dynamic planning, careful specification and innovative ideas will reduce your costs and your carbon footprint. Here are some ideas to get you started:
      • 01 Introduce shared workspace Introduce hot desking – where people don’t have a fixed desk but share resources when they are in the office - to reduce your overall footprint and save property costs
      • 02 Create flexible spaces Adapt rarely used space such as canteens or meeting rooms into flexible areas that can become office space. This will reduce your overall need for space, thus reducing your energy bills.
      • 03 Optimise the office layout Review the total needs of your office and how best to use the space available for the tasks, people and their roles. Good space planning will result in savings.
      • 04 Introduce flexible meeting Lots of large meeting rooms maybe unnecessary. Use different height meeting options – standing tables, small benches with stools etc . This will keep your meetings short, sharp and effective and reduces the need for visitor seating and large rooms.
      • 05 Go digital Use digital media, rather than paper storage. By opting for specialist inserts in cabinets you can reduce the volume of paper storage required and the overall floor-plan you need. It will save both property costs and residuals costs..
      • 06 Annexe the Archive Put archive storage in areas that are seldom used. An archive storage area may only be visited infrequently and does not need to be lit or heated to the same degree as the common working areas
      • 07 Keep heating systems clear Do not plan furniture in front of heat sources. Blocking radiators or grills will make the heating / ventilation systems inefficient and have to work harder – wasting energy and costing more.
      • 08 Keep windows free Avoid tall furniture at windows and glass partitions. Windows let in natural energy in the form of sunlight and heat. Solutions are now available to store heat radiation from windows, thus reducing your heating costs.
      • 09 Use Carpets to good effect Carpets create a warm and comfortable feeling as well as adding acoustic benefits. In rooms with solid floors approx 10-12% more of the heat is lost through the floor
      • 10 Use the stairs. Use the lift less. OK this may be obvious, but good exercise contributes to good ergonomic practice and of course using the lift less means less energy use.
    • 9. The easiest way to reduce the environmental impact of your workplace?
      • Cut it in half!
    • 10. Topics
      • Workplace analysis
      • Occupancy
      • Flexile working
    • 11. Workplace trends
      • Older workforce
      • More inclusive workplace
      • Environmental issues just part of everyday life
      • Blurred boundaries between corporate and personal life
      • Flexible or Tele-working more prevalent
      • Technology continues to evolve,
        • VoIP will mean the phone will disappear from desks
        • Wirless networks the norm in offices
      • Younger generation with different skills and aspirations “X-box generation”
    • 12. Look at what you have now
      • Look at your existing facility and ask:
        • Does this support our current corporate strategy?
        • Does this reflect our team interactions?
        • Was it created with our current technology in mind?
        • Don’t just jump onto the latest bandwagon…
    • 13. Case study
    • 14.  
    • 15. Wave shaped bench
      • London borough of Ealing
    • 16. Paths of communication Critical – proximity required Important – but proximity not required IT Compliance Board rm. Finance HR Directors Sales Project Int Sales Exec hot desk. CVM Library Creative Team Sales hot desk OFP Marketing Printers
    • 17. Directly transposed onto Plan…. IT Compliance Board rm. Finance HR Directors Sales Project Int Sales Exec hot desk. CVM Library Creative Team Sales hot desk OFP Marketing Printers
    • 18. IT Compliance Board rm. Finance HR Directors Int Sales Exec hot desk. CVM Library Creative Team OFP Marketing Printers Sales hot desk Sales Project
    • 19. How it was IT Compliance Board rm. Finance HR Directors Int Sales Exec hot desk. CVM Library Creative Team OFP Marketing Printers Sales hot desk Sales Project Quiet Low level meetings Lively discussions Noise Levels
    • 20. 2 Initial solution IT Compliance Board rm. Finance HR Directors Sales Project Int Sales Exec hot desk. Library Creative Team Sales hot desk OFP Marketing Printers CVM
    • 21. 2 .1 Revised solution with sales hot desk areas, CVM and project areas being split IT Compliance Board rm. Finance HR Directors Sales Project Int Sales Exec hot desk. CVM Library Creative Team Sales hot desk OFP Marketing Printers Sales hot desk Sales hot desk CVM
    • 22. IT Compliance Board rm. Finance HR Directors Sales Project Int Sales Exec hot desk. CVM Library Creative Team Sales hot desk OFP Marketing Printers Sales hot desk Sales hot desk CVM Quiet Low level meetings Lively discussions Noise Levels 2 .1 Revised solution with sales hot desk areas, CVM and project areas being split
    • 23. Block Planning – Hewlett Packard Zoning plan New ideas were introduced that would encourage a more flexible and productive environment
    • 24. Existing Layout The existing space suffered from a inflexible layout , and did not give the client the density they needed
    • 25.  
    • 26. Storage Audit
    • 27. Get things off the desk
      • Monitor arm & CPU holder
        • Use space below monitor
        • Better ergonomics
      • Shelves
      • Filing frames
      • Pen pots
      • CD racks
    • 28. Screen hung storage
    • 29. Look at workstation geometry 2.1m 1.82 sq m 1.8m 2.5m 1.66 sq m 1.82 sq m 1.6 sq m
    • 30. Rectangular versus delta worktops
    • 31. Delta or 120 degree
    • 32. Benching
    • 33. Cubicle
    • 34. Variable Density Benching
    • 35. Benching Proposed area – up to 120 Existing area - 70
    • 36. Rectangular and bench Usable work area Shared work area
    • 37. Delta /120 o Single piece top (Delta top 2) Usable work area 600 Deep
    • 38. 120 o Workstation Proposed 120 Deg headcount - 132 Existing 1600x 1600 headcount - 114
    • 39. 120 o Workstation By moving post, printing, storage and amenity areas to an area near the entrance of the floor, a central hub is created. This would be like a town centre, bringing people together and providing a ‘first port of call’ when entering the floor.
    • 40. RSA Glasgow
      • Bench layout
      • Headcount 409
    • 41. RSA Glasgow
      • Delta layout
      • Headcount 422
    • 42. RSA Sunderland
      • Delta layout
      • Headcount 240
    • 43. RSA Sunderland
      • Bench layout
      • Headcount 256
    • 44. Ancillary areas
    • 45. Creative meeting spaces
    • 46. Conclusion
      • One size does not fit all

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