Chapter03

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Chapter03

  1. 1. Chapter 3 The Marketing Environment E i
  2. 2. Marketing Environmental Forces: Scanning, Analysis, Response Competitive Economic Political Product Price Target Market M k t Place Promotion Legal Regulatory Technological Socio-cultural Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 2 | 2 3|2
  3. 3. Marketing Environment The Marketing Environmental forces affect a marketer’s ability to facilitate exchanges in three ways: They influence customers’ Product Price preferences and needs Target Market They may affect buyers’ buyers reactions to the firm’s Place Promotion marketing mix. They help determine whether and how marketing activities will be performed. Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 3 3|3
  4. 4. Examining and Responding to the Marketing Environment g • Environmental Scanning The collecting of information about forces in the marketing environment; Sources of Information? http://www.lib.uni.edu/ris/business p • Environmental Analysis Assessing and interpreting the information gathered through environmental scanning • Accuracy • Consistency y • Significance – Opportunity or Threat? • Responding to Environmental Forces Reactive – passive view R ti i i Proactive – attempt to shape and influence Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 4 3|4
  5. 5. COMPETITIVE FORCES Brand competitors Similar benefits/features/prices Direct competition Product competitors Same product class; different features/benefits Generic competitors Very different product; satisfies same b i need ti fi basic d Total budget competitors Competing for same customer’s dollars (Volvic brand competitors include Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. Fiji and Evian. Page 60) 3|5
  6. 6. What Wh t possible ibl competitor p types are being targeted? Reprinted with permission of Tropicana Products, Inc. Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3|6
  7. 7. How does Kleenex differentiate its products to carve out its niche? © 2004 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Reprinted with Permission. Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3|7
  8. 8. Economic Forces • Economic Conditions • Marketer responses? 60 Prosperity 50 Expansion 40 30 20 Recession Recovery 10 0 200A 200B 200C 200D 200E -10 -20 -30 Depression Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3|8
  9. 9. Gains In Buying Power (1990-2010) 450% 400% 350% 300% 250% 200% 150% 100% 50% 0% c ks s ns s ni an te c ia pa hi la si nd W B A is .I H er m A Augustachronicle.com, “Minority Buying Power”, Oct. 22, 2005, http://chronicle.augusta.com/diversity/2005/buying-power.shtml Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3|9
  10. 10. Economic Forces • Buying Power A function of economic conditions and size of resources Income Disposable income vs. Discretionary income Credit Increase current buying power at the expense of…. Wealth Use to make current purchases Generate additional income Enables acquisition of large amounts of credit • Willingness to Spend Considerations? E C id ti ? Expectations? t ti ? influenced by the ability to buy and numerous psychological and social forces. Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 10
  11. 11. Ranking Products Consumers Would Cut Back on if Spending Decreased Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 11
  12. 12. Wacky Warnings A label on a baby stroller warns: “Remove child before folding A household iron warns users: “Never iron clothes while they are being worn” A warning on an electric drill made for carpenters cautions: “This product not intended for use as a dental drill.” A label on a personal watercraft that warns: “Never use a lit match or p open flame to check fuel level.” A 12-inch rack for storing compact disks warns: “Do not use as a ladder.” A cartridge for a laser printer warns, “Do not eat toner” A 13-inch wheel on a wheelbarrow warns: “Not intended for highway use use” A warning on cell phone: Don’t try to dry your phone in a microwave oven. A box of birthday cake candles says: “DO NOT use soft wax as ear DO plugs or for any other function that involves insertion into a body cavity.” Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 12 3 | 12
  13. 13. Legal and Regulatory Forces • Pro-competitive Legislation: p g (FTC) influences marketing activities most; Designed to: preserve competition titi prevent the restraint of trade and the monopolizing of markets p g prevent illegal competitive trade practices • Consumer Protection Legislation Designed to protect customers from: deceptive trade practices and the sale of hazardous products adulterated and mislabeled food and drugs the invasion of personal privacy and the misuse of personal information by firms Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 13 3 | 13
  14. 14. Political Forces: Maintaining Relations To influence the creation of laws and regulations affecting industries and specific businesses banking, banking health care agri-business oil defense care, agri-business, oil, telecommunications, labor, construction, etc. Lobbyists work to communicate businesses’ concerns about issues affecting their industries and markets Assist in securing foreign markets Campaign contrib tions of corporate related indi id als contributions corporate-related individuals and PACs may provide influence Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 14
  15. 15. Major Laws Affecting Marketing Decisions Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 15
  16. 16. TECHNOLOGICAL FORCES •Impact of Technology Impact Effects include: Dynamics D i Reach Self-Sustaining •Adoption and Use of Technology (Monster.com has changed the way people search for jobs. Page 72) Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 16
  17. 17. Adoption and Use of Technology Would You Like to Buy a Fuel-Cell Car? Why or Why Not? y y Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 17
  18. 18. SOCIOCULTURAL FORCES The i fl Th influences i a society in i t and its culture(s) that change people’s attitudes, b li f l ’ ttit d beliefs, norms, customs, and lifestyles. lif t l Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 18
  19. 19. Top Trends That Changed America 1. Diversity: Record immigration changes the face of the nation 2. The fight for equality: More women in the workforce, paid better wages. 3. Millions living longer: 79 million baby boomers reach their 60s. g g y 4. Globalization: One world, increasingly one economy. 5. Global warming: Whatever the cause, weather patterns change. 6. 6 Gay rights: From statehouses to military cultural issues grow military, grow. 7. Are we safe? Fear of terrorism changes daily life. 8. Smoking snuffed out: Tried to light a cigarette lately? 9. Obesity crisis: Adults and kids ever heavier. 10. Tech's cult of "me": Computers, cellphones, iPods make technology personal. Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 19
  20. 20. Issues Of Sociocultural Forces Demographics and Diversity Characteristics: Age, gender, race, ethnicity Marital/parental status, income, education Impact on Marketers? • Cultural Values Health Family Environment Others?? Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. 3 | 20

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