Ayn Rand Bio for class
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Ayn Rand Bio for class

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Ayn Rand Bio for class Ayn Rand Bio for class Presentation Transcript

  • AYN RAND The Life and Times
  • AYN RAND The Life and Times 1905: Born in St. Petersburg, Russia on February 2 1911: Taught herself to read 1914: Decided to become an author (age 9) 1924: Graduated from University of Petrograd (same year saw disintegration of free inquiry and take over of the university by Communist thugs) 1926: Moved to America (lied to Russian officials about duration of stay) 1929: Married Frank O’Connor (married for 50 years) 1931: Became an American citizen 1932: sold screenplay to RKO Radio Pictures “Night of January 16th” . It was produced in Hollywood and on Broadway. 1936: Wrote We The Living – The most autobiographical story about Russian socialist tyranny 1935: Began writing The Fountainhead 1937: Wrote Anthem 1943: The Fountainhead published; earned Rand the title “Champion of Individualism” 1946: Began writing Atlas Shrugged 1951: moved back to New York to finish Atlas Shrugged 1957: Atlas Shrugged published 1957-death: lectured and wrote on her philosophy of objectivism 1982: died in New York, New York on March 6
  • AYN RAND Things She Said I w o r s h i p i n d i v i d u a l s for their highest possibilities as individuals, and I l o a t h e h u m a n i t y for its failure to live up to these possibilities. Man—every man— is an end in himself, not the means to the ends of others. He must exist for his own sake, neither sacrificing himself to others nor sacrificing others to himself. The pursuit of his own rational self-interest and of his own happiness is the highest moral purpose of his life.
  • AYN RAND Things She Said About Objectivism My philosophy, Objectivism, holds that: 1. Reality exists as an objective absolute—facts are facts, independent of man’s feelings, wishes, hopes or fears. 2. Reason (the faculty which identifies and integrates the material provided by man’s senses) is man’s only means of perceiving reality, his only source of knowledge, his only guide to action, and his basic means of survival. 3. Man—every man—is an end in himself, not the means to the ends of others. He must exist for his own sake, neither sacrificing himself to others nor sacrificing others to himself. The pursuit of his own rational self-interest and of his own happiness is the highest moral purpose of his life. 4. The ideal political-economic system is laissez-faire capitalism. It is a system where men deal with one another, not as victims and executioners, nor as masters and slaves, but as traders, by free, voluntary exchange to mutual benefit. It is a system where no man may obtain any values from others by resorting to physical force, and no man may initiate the use of physical force against others. The government acts only as a policeman that protects man’s rights; it uses physical force only in retaliation and only against those who initiate its use, such as criminals or foreign invaders. In a system of full capitalism, there should be (but, historically, has not yet been) a complete separation of state and economics, in the same way and for the same reasons as the separation of state and church.
  • AYN RAND Her Works Other Works include: We The Living (1936) 3 plays for the stage: “Think Twice”; “Red Pawn”; “Good Copy” 9 nonfiction writings and 12 published posthumously
  • AYN RAND Her Works Other Works include: We The Living (1936) 3 plays for the stage: “Think Twice”; “Red Pawn”; “Good Copy” 9 nonfiction writings and 12 published posthumously