Aji ajal

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NANOPOLLUTION

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  • 21 oktober 2008 First associations?
  • 21 oktober 2008
  • Feyneman 1959 There is Plenty of room at the bottom (idee voor nanotechnologie) Richard Smalley (ontdekker buckeyball 1985) Drexler (auteur boek: Engines of Creation, 1986)
  • Feyneman 1959 There is Plenty of room at the bottom (idee voor nanotechnologie) Richard Smalley (ontdekker buckeyball 1985) Drexler (auteur boek: Engines of Creation, 1986)
  • Aji ajal

    1. 1. A Critic On Nano pollution & The Need For Precaution Technology MATTERS - For Both Good and ill………AJAL.A.J , ASSISTANT PROFESSOR , FISAT – KOCHI AJI.A.J , LECTURER , JYOTHI ENGINERING COLLEGE, CHERUTHURUTHY
    2. 2. NanotechnologyBirth of Nanotechnology• Professor Taniguchi of Tokyo Science University used the word“nanotechnology” to describe the science and technologyof processing or building parts with nanometric tolerances.•A nanometer is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one 2billionth of a meter.
    3. 3. 3
    4. 4. Nanocomposite body parts Materials Nanopollution Environment Electronics DNA nanochips • Super-hi-speed transistor Life sciences • Hi-capacity memory chip • Biosensors • ‘Genomic’ drugs • Nano-delivery systems Nanotechnology: • Nanorobots future core technology for Nanoparticle toxicity next generation of industries 4© DAR2007
    5. 5. Event : Transformer Fire at Power Plant 5
    6. 6. The Cell NucleusLysosome Mitochondrion
    7. 7. Mitochondrion 500nm x 2 to 5000 nm
    8. 8. Cell Microtubules
    9. 9. Cell division
    10. 10. Some of the disadvantages of are; • . In relation to health problems, it is so minute that its existence in the hand is much unnoticed. However, the nature and extent of Global monetary crisis, loss risk to consumer health from of jobs, oil becomes ingestion of nanoparticles via food worthless, diamonds become and drink are largely unknown. worthless, atomic weapons more destructive and accessible•The risk of inhaling this couldbe very dangerous, due towhich it can be a cause ofdeath. Smart Dust 10
    11. 11. idee voor nanotechnologie"The Next Big Thing Is Really Small” 11
    12. 12. About risks still a lot is unknown 12
    13. 13. Introduction nanotechnology • Possible dangers: – Environment – water =>fish – soil =>bacteria – air =>animals, humans – Lungs – PM .01? – New asbestos? – Intestines – inflammation? – Skin 13
    14. 14. Introduction nanotechnology • Problems: – Mass: NP are very tiny, => traditional dose- response does no longer apply. – Toxicology: effects of NP may differ. A knowledge gap exists. – Detection : due to the size of NP and lack of knowledge detection is difficult. – Law: current legislation is in place on all chemicals, but how does one control an undetectable substance? 14
    15. 15. bio hazards, nano hazards and radiation hazards. 3 Hazard Symbol Mini Buttons - Punk Goth Emo Nano No - No ?? 15
    16. 16. 16
    17. 17. 17
    18. 18. Nano powder 18
    19. 19. Ethics, Precaution, & DemocraticDecision-Making in Nanotechnology
    20. 20. Dimensions of “nano-ethics”• Ethical implications of NT are as broad as the field itself• Berne (2006) uses a three-dimensional framework for thinking about ethics related to NTFirst Dimension Moral assertions Academic integrity, research commonly held within ethics, consideration of and outside of occupational and public health research communities, issues primum non nocere.Second Negotiable moral Who will control emerging claims, subject to technologies, and for whatDimension change based on purpose? What will happen to perception. personal privacy? Should technological developments ever be “rushed?”Third Dimension Meta-ethical What is the moral good of understandings of the progress? What will these purpose of human changes mean for emotional, living, beliefs about spiritual, psychological well- existence: meaning, being of the human-family? selfhood, purpose. 20
    21. 21. 21
    22. 22. 22
    23. 23. Effects of air pollution• For every increase of 10μg/m3 in PM2.5 ↑mortality by 6% – Cardiovascular disease – Chronic lung disease
    24. 24. MesotheliomaCopyright © 2007, TWI Ltd 24 World Centre for Materials Joining Technology
    25. 25. Nano Pollution Ultimate test for the “Throw-away Society”?
    26. 26. Surveillance
    27. 27. Lack of Privacy
    28. 28. Nano Weapons  Easy to build  Hard to monitor  Easy to deliver  Obsolete almost immediately  Programmable and controllable
    29. 29. WMD Proliferation
    30. 30. Terrorism
    31. 31. Arms Race
    32. 32. An inconvenient truth “An inconvenient truth has become an unfortunate reality” 32© DAR2007 - UN Sec-General (2007)
    33. 33. We need solutions… And we need them now. 33
    34. 34. 34© DAR2007 http://community.livejournal.com/vintagephoto
    35. 35. War
    36. 36. Challenges of Nanotech I. Develop Technology — Happening II. Understand Implications — Well begun III. Prepare Solutions — Barely started IV. Implement Globally — yet to decide 36
    37. 37. What do YOU think????? 37
    38. 38. How will we improve our health and wellbeing in the future? 38
    39. 39. Nanofilm in eyewear.Glass coating is 39 Eye cream withhydrophillic. buckyballs.
    40. 40. 40
    41. 41. 41Energy from the Sun is Abundant
    42. 42. Nanotechnology Overview - Reading Apopka oasis reading café • Michael Crichton’s “prey” • John Robert Marlow’s “Nano” 42
    43. 43. Let’s Pause forQuestions from the Audience 43
    44. 44. 1. C.H. Peng, C.C. Hwang, C.K. Hong and S.Y. Chen, Materials Science and Engineering, B107, (2004), 295-300. 2. Z. Yue, L. Li, J. Zhou, H. Zhang and Z. Gui, Materials Science and Engineering, B64, (1999), 68-72. 3. Y. Li, G. Li and Q. Yin, Materials Science and Engineering, B130, (2006), 264-268. 4. M.R. Vaezi and S.K. Sadrnezhaad, Materials & Design, 28[2], (2007), 515-519. 5. S.-Y. Chu, T.-M. Yan and S.-L. Chen, Ceramics International, 26, (2000), 733-737. 6. G. Westin, A. Ekstrand, M. Nygren, R. Q. sterlund and P. Merkelbach, J. Mater. Chem., 4, (1994), 615-621. 7. S.C. Pillai, J.M. Kelly and E. Declan. McCormack and Raghavendra Ramesh, J. Mater. Chem., 14, (2004), 1572-1578. 8. V.C. de Sousa, M.R. Morelli and Ruth H.G. Kiminami, Ceramic International, 26, (2000), 561-564.9. C.-C. Hwang and T.-Y. Wu, Materials Science and Engineering, B111, (2004), 197-20 44 44
    45. 45. Open to Discussion 45
    46. 46. 46
    47. 47. 47

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