Coordinated Management Of Meaning

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Coordinated Management Of Meaning

  1. 1. COORDINATED MANAGEMENT OF MEANING (CMM) Of Barnett Pearce and Vernon Cronen
  2. 2. BASIC PROPOSITIONS <ul><li>Main focus: people who disagree can live together in relative harmony </li></ul><ul><li>Quality of life is directly related to quality of communication </li></ul><ul><li>Persons-in-conversation co-construct their own social realities and are simultaneously shaped by the worlds they create </li></ul><ul><li>Change communication = change quality of life: this is the “proof” offered by CMM </li></ul>
  3. 3. Some CMM Approaches <ul><li>Levels of meaning, and different accounts that inter-actants tell about episodes, relationships, identities and cultural patterns; </li></ul><ul><li>Strange loop: Diagnosis causes A to change attitude to B, leads B to new behavior, leads A to doubt diagnosis, and return to old attitude, leading to “regression” by B. </li></ul><ul><li>Handling moral conflict by finding ways for adherents to conflicting positions to listen to the other position from a third-party perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Dialogic communication: trained facilitators encourage cross-community dialogue, facilitating the telling of stories, reframing, weaving together diverse stories. </li></ul>
  4. 4. 4 Principles of Social Construction <ul><li>Our connections with others form who we are. Communication is highly consequential. </li></ul><ul><li>The way people communicate often more important than what they communicate </li></ul><ul><li>Actions of persons-in-conversation are reflexively reproduced as dialogue continues </li></ul><ul><li>As social constructionists, CMM researchers see themselves as curious participants in a pluralistic world. Preferred model of research is “action research” </li></ul>
  5. 5. STORIES TOLD, STORIES LIVED <ul><li>Stories lived are the co-constructed actions we perform with others </li></ul><ul><li>Coordination occurs when our stories lived fit with the stories lived by others </li></ul><ul><li>Stories told are the stories we use to make sense of our stories lived </li></ul><ul><li>Coherence takes place when we interpret each other’s stories the same way </li></ul>
  6. 6. Coordination and Coherence <ul><li>We coordinate with others to achieve our respective visions of what is necessary, good, noble etc. </li></ul><ul><li>To coordinate we don’t have to see the world in the same way (people in church may have different beliefs about meanings of rituals they share) </li></ul><ul><li>Coordination in sense of co-construction of social reality is limited by power imbalances. </li></ul><ul><li>People achieve meshing of stories lived through dialogic communication: speaking in a way that makes it possible for others to listen; listening in a way that makes it possible for others to speak. </li></ul>
  7. 7. How People Tell Their Stories <ul><li>Every act of speech is wedded to four contexts: </li></ul><ul><li>An episode is a communication routine that has boundaries and rules (e.g. phone-call home; plea for extension on a paper) </li></ul><ul><li>A relationship between persons-in conversation suggests how speech might be interpreted </li></ul><ul><li>Self-Identity </li></ul><ul><li>Culture describes webs of shared meanings and values. </li></ul><ul><li>Both parties affect and are affected by the other. Contexts co-evolve as people speak. </li></ul>
  8. 8. UNTOLD STORIES <ul><li>THOSE THAT PARTICIPANTS HAVE DECIDED NOT TO DISCLOSE </li></ul><ul><li>LIE BELOW THE LEVEL OF CONSCIOUSNESS </li></ul><ul><li>THOSE THAT OTHERS IN CONVERSATION ARE UNABLE OR UNWILLING TO HEAR </li></ul>
  9. 9. DIALOGIC COMMUNICATION <ul><li>Refers to what has been said by the previous speaker </li></ul><ul><li>Claims that what was said raises a question or prompts an insight </li></ul><ul><li>Answers that question or describes that insight </li></ul><ul><li>Expresses where he or she now stand on the issue. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Critique <ul><li>Core ideas difficult to pin down </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of consistency in use of terms </li></ul><ul><li>Can be enlightening, also perplexing </li></ul><ul><li>Whereas symbolic interactionism focuses on communication in the formation of identity and self-perception, CMM focuses on communication in the formation of shared social realities </li></ul>

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