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Boy in the striped pjs book talk(2007)
Boy in the striped pjs book talk(2007)
Boy in the striped pjs book talk(2007)
Boy in the striped pjs book talk(2007)
Boy in the striped pjs book talk(2007)
Boy in the striped pjs book talk(2007)
Boy in the striped pjs book talk(2007)
Boy in the striped pjs book talk(2007)
Boy in the striped pjs book talk(2007)
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Boy in the striped pjs book talk(2007)

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Power Point with audio for The Boy in Striped Pajamas Book Talk - Connected Classrooms 2010

Power Point with audio for The Boy in Striped Pajamas Book Talk - Connected Classrooms 2010

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  • 1. “‘The fury has something he wants to discuss with me,’ said Father who was allowed to interrupt Mother even if no one else was. ‘I just got a phone call this afternoon. The only time he can make it is Thursday evening and he’s invited himself to dinner.’” “A couple of days later he came home from school to find Maria standing in his bedroom, pulling all his belongings out of the wardrobe and packing them in four large wooden crates, even the things he’d hidden at the back that belonged to him and were nobody else’s business, and that is where the story began.”
  • 2. “. . . there were always so many visitors to the house – men in fantastic uniforms, women with typewriters that he had to keep his mucky hands off – and they were always very polite to Father and told each other that he was a man to watch and that the Fury had big things in mind for him.”
  • 3. “When he first saw their new house Bruno’s eyes opened wide, his mouth made the shape of an O and his arms stretched out at his sides once again. Everything about it seemed to be the exact opposite of their old home and he couldn’t believe that they were really going to live there. The house in Berlin had stood on a quiet street and alongside it were a handful of other big houses like his own, and it was always nice to look at them because they were almost the same as his house but not quite, and other boys lived in them who he played with (if they were friends) or steered clear of (if they were trouble). The new house, however, stood all on its own in an empty, desolate place and there were no other houses anywhere to be seen, which meant there would be no other families around and no other boys to with, neither friends nor trouble.”
  • 4. “It was a bright, sunny day that first afternoon at Out-With and the sun reappeared from behind a cloud just as Gretel looked through the window, but after a moment her eyes adjusted and the sun disappeared again and she saw exactly what Bruno had been talking about. To begin with, they weren’t children at all. Not all of them, at least. There were small boys and big boys, fathers and grandfathers. Perhaps a few uncles too. And some of those people who live on their own on everybody’s road but don’t seem to have any relatives at all. They were everyone.” “And one final thought came into her brother’s head as he watched the hundreds of people in the distance going about their business, and that was the fact that all of them – the small boys, the big boys, the fathers, the grandfathers, the uncles, the people that lived on their own on everybody’s road but didn’t seem to have any relatives at all – were wearing the same clothes as each other: a pair of grey striped pajamas with a grey striped cap on their heads.”
  • 5. “Bruno slowed down when he saw the dot that became a speck that became a blob that became a figure that became a boy. Although there was a fence separating them, he knew that you could never be too careful with strangers and it was always best to approach them with caution. So he continued to walk, and before long they were facing each other. ‘Hello,’ said Bruno. ‘Hello,’ said the boy. The boy was smaller than Bruno and was sitting on the ground with a forlorn expression. He wore the same striped pajamas that all the other people on that side of the fence wore, and a striped cloth cap on his head. He wasn’t wearing any shoes or socks and his feet were rather dirty. On his arm he wore a armband with a star on it.”
  • 6. “’Papa,’ said Shmuel. ‘We can’t find him.’ ‘Cant’ find him? That’s very odd. You mean he’s lost?’ ‘I suppose so,’ said Shmuel. ‘He was here on Monday and then he went on work duty with some other men and none of them have come back.’” “‘Unless . . .’ he began , thinking about it for a moment and allowing a plan to hatch in his head. He reached a hand up to his head and felt where his hair used to be but was now just stubble that hadn’t fully grown back. ‘Don’t you remember that you said I looked like you?’ he asked Shmuel. ‘Since I had my head shaved?’ ‘Only fatter,’ conceded Shmuel. ‘Well if that’s the case,’ said Bruno, ‘and if I had a pair of striped pajamas too, then I could come over on a visit and no one would be any the wiser.’ . . . ‘And you could help me look for Papa,’ said Shmuel. ‘Why not?’ said Bruno. . . .”
  • 7. Does Bruno go over to the other side to help Shmuel? What is it like at the house when Bruno isn’t visiting his new friend? Who is the Fury, what is Out-With, and what is the important job that Bruno’s father does there?

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