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    Floods Floods Presentation Transcript

    • FloodsDisaster profile & Disaster management procedure in IndiaSubmitted by:K.AmrutaKarunakarLavanyaMani shankarSuprajaShameerVI th sem ,JNA&FAUPLANNING & MANAGEMENT FOR DISASTERS
    • Over view• Definitions for disaster and floods• Objectives• Types of floods• Causes of floods• Floods impacts• Methodology• Flood forecasting• Flood management• Flood zoning• Case study(Vijayawada)6/11/2013 Floods- Disaster Managment 2
    • Disaster• Disaster is a natural or human , causedphenomenon, which causes seriousdisruption of the functioning of acommunity or a society causingwidespread human, material, economicand environmental losses which elicitedthe ability of the affected community,society to cope using its resources.• Floods are a common feature in thecountry that occur every year in manyparts including South India.6/11/2013 3Floods- Disaster Managment
    • FLOODS ARE NATURAL PHENOMENA.FLOODS ARE WATER RELATED DISASTERFLOODS6/11/2013 4Floods- Disaster Managment
    • OBJECTIVE OF STUDY• To identify the causes of floods• To describe the overall impact of flooding• To formulate a strategy for the flood affectedareas in Vijayawada, with reference to– MITIGATION,– PREPAREDNESS,– RESPONSE,– RECOVERY.6/11/2013 Floods- Disaster Managment 5
    • INTRODUCTIONA flood occurs when the GeomorphicEquilibrium in the river system is disturbedbecause of intrinsic or extrinsic factors orwhen a system crosses the geomorphicthreshold.(a) Flooding in a river due to aggradation ofriver bed (intrinsic threshold);(b) Flooding in a river due to heavy rainfall(extrinsic threshold)Floods in major cities especiallyduring rainy season are proving todisastrous not only to theenvironment but also have seriousimplications for human life andproperty.6/11/2013 6Floods- Disaster ManagmentSource: FLOOD DISASTERS ANDMANAGEMENT
    • TYPES OF FLOODS• Types of floods•Flash floods•River floods•Coastal Floods•Urban Flood• According to their duration flood can be divided into different categories:•Slow-Onset Floods: Slow Onset Floods usually last for a relatively longer period, it may last forone or more peeks, or even months.•Rapid-Onset Floods: Rapid1Onset Floods last for a relatively shorter period, they usually last forone or two days only.•Flash Floods: Flash Floods may occur within minutes or a fe1w hours after heavyrainfall, tropical storm, failure of dams or levees or releases of ice dams. And it causes thegreatest damages to society.
    • The soil becomessaturated andoverland flow andthrough flow reachthe river anddischarge increases.Overland flow arrivesfirst.The time from peak rainfall to peakdischarge is the LAG TIME.The discharge starts tofall slowly as water isadded from throughflow and groundwaterflows which are muchslower.The base flow suppliesthe river with waterbetween storms andkeeps it flowing insummer.Rainfall is interceptedor infiltrated into thesoil moisture storeStart of the storm there is aslow rise in discharge, as only asmall amount of water fallsinto the channel
    • Contd….FloodsNaturalStorm Surge,Tsunami, Glacial Melt,Landslide, Riverine,Estuarine & Marine FloodEg: bursting of landslideblockades in the catchmentareaof the Bhagirathi River inAugust 1978 (Gupta and Dave,1982).Man madeBreach ofDam/ Barrage/EmbankmentRelease from Reservoir,Urban FloodEg: In the year 2009,Almattiand Naryanpur dams on theKrishna River in Karnataka.This water along with rainwater reached Andhra Pradeshnear the Srisailam dam. Itcauses a hevy floods inandhrapradesh6/11/2013 9Floods- Disaster Managment
    • Causes of floods
    • FACTORSVEGETATION COVERThis varies seasonally. The type andamount will affect interception andstemflow/throughfall. Overland flow isreduced. Lag time will be increased.ROCK TYPEImpermeable rocks prevent groundwaterflow and encourage through flow andoverland flow. These rocks will decreaselag time. Permeable rock will have theopposite effect.LAKES & RESERVOIRSThese will store floodwater andthus reduce lag time and controlriver response to heavy rainfall.SOIL TYPE & DEPTHDeep soils store morewater, pipes in the soilencourage through flow.Soils with small porespaces will reduceinfiltration and increaseoverland flow.LAND USEImpermeable surfacescreated by urbanisation willreduce infiltration andencourage overland flow.Different types of cropsaffect interception rates e.g.cereals 7-15%.RAINFALL INTENSITY & DURATIONIntense rain will increase overlandflow and reduce lag times. Gentlerain over a longer time will allowmore infiltration.SLOPESSteep slopes will encourageoverland flow and gentleslope will slow run off down.CLIMATEThe distribution of rainfall over theyear and the temperatures willaffect the lag times.
    • FLOODS IMPACTS• Human Loss• Property Loss• Affects the Major Roads• Disruption of Air / Train / Bus services• Spread of Water-borne Communicable Diseases• Communication Breakdown• Electricity Supply Cut off• Economic and Social Disruption• Increase in Air / Water Pollution6/11/2013 Floods- Disaster Managment 12
    • Flood forecasting• Anticipating floods before they occur allows for precautions to be taken andpeople to be warned so that they can be prepared in advance for floodingconditions.• For example,– Farmers can remove animals from low-lying areas and utility services can put in placeemergency provisions to re-route services if needed. Emergency services can also makeprovisions to have enough resources available ahead of time to respond to emergencies asthey occur.• In order to make the most accurate flood forecasts for waterways, it is best tohave a long time-series of historical data that relates stream flows tomeasured past rainfall events• Radar estimates of rainfall and general weather forecasting techniques arealso important components of good flood forecasting.
    • Flood Control• In many countries around the world, waterways prone to floods are often carefullymanaged. Defences such as levees, bunds, reservoirs, and weirs are used to preventwaterways from overflowing their banks.• In the riparian zone near rivers and streams, erosion control measures can be takento try and slow down or reverse the natural forces that cause many waterwaysto meander over long periods of time.• Flood controls, such as dams, can be built and maintained over time to try andreduce the occurrence and severity of floods as well.
    • Flood benefits• Floods (in particular more frequent or smaller floods) can also bring manybenefits, such as– Recharging ground water,– Making soil more fertile and increasing nutrients in some soils.• Flood waters provide much needed water resources in arid and semi-arid regionswhere precipitation can be very unevenly distributed throughout the year.• Freshwater floods particularly play an important role in maintaining ecosystems inriver corridors and are a key factor in maintaining floodplain biodiversity.• Flooding can spread nutrients to lakes and rivers, which can lead toincreased biomass and improved fisheries for a few years.• For some fish species, an inundated floodplain may form a highly suitable locationfor spawning with few predators and enhanced levels of nutrients or food.• Fish, such as the weather fish, make use of floods in order to reach new habitats.Bird populations may also profit from the boost in food production caused byflooding.
    • 6/11/2013 16Floods- Disaster ManagmentNationalperspective:• Urban regions with more than 5 million population• Mumbai, Assam, Jammu and Kashmir and Bihar.• Brief review of floods with the help of secondary sources of dataRegionalPerspective• Urban Regions with more than 3 million population.• Visakhapatnam and Vijayawada(case study area) urban region.• Brief review of floods with the help of secondary sources of data.LocalPerspective• Hyderabad(Musi river)• .Brief review of floods with the help of secondary sources of dataMETHODOLOGY:
    • Floods in India Floods cause damage to houses, industries, public utilities and propertyresulting in huge economic losses, apart from loss of lives. Though it is not possible to control the flood disaster totally, by adoptingsuitable structural and non-structural measures the flood damages can beminimised.Parameters Area liable to Floods(million Ha.)Total Damage Rs.13,400 millionArea Affected 8.11 million hectareCrop Area Affected 3.57 million hectareHuman Lives Lost 1579 Nos.Cattle Lost 95,000 Nos.NATIONAL PERSPECTIVE
    • Flood prone zones , areas in INDIA
    • Major River Floods in 2002The areas in red are where river floods have occurred .
    • Analysis over years
    • INDIAFLOOD PRONE AREAOTHERSTATES43.9%UTTAR PRADESH21.90%BIHAR12.71%ASSAM9.40%WEST BENGAL7.91% ORISSA4.18%
    • FLOOD MANAGEMENTAREA AFFECTED BY FLOODS2.297.499.449.244.866.265.777.536.566.123.494.91.464.747.127.156.26.4613.254.111.796.76.1711.9111.4617.53.9911.466.128.879.0210.718.388.818.8916.294.639.36.172.094.632.756.117.43.857.182.555.1663.087.096.58.031195319561959196219651968197119741977198019831986198919921995199820012004YEARAREAINM.Ha.
    • FLOOD DAMAGE IN INDIA DURING52.457.23102.7353.6323.3743.9786.263.1731.3794.8936.6166.617.1488.43155.43211.1404.43287.83632.48158.19569569.02471.64888.691201.851454.76614.2840.51196.51644.882491.611905.564059.273748.532569.724630.32405.331708.921488.333344.532536.791794.593702.312952.782831.185845.982107.861415.88195319551957195919611963196519671969197119731975197719791981198319851987198919911993199519971999RUPEESINCROREYEAR
    • Total flood damage state wise and forthe union territory of Delhi The macro-flood zones ofIndia may be broadly groupedinto the following zones: (a) Brahmaputra River Basin, (b) Ganga River Basin, (c) North-West Rivers Basin,and (d) Central India and DeccanRivers Basin.
    • 2012 Brahmaputra floodsThis was another sorrow caused to Assam in recent years.In July 2012, Brahmaputra and its tributaries showed itswrath and since it was natural but it grabs a spot at number2 and eye-catching event because the main area which wasaffected included Kaziranga National Park, a park which isthe natural habitat of Rhinos. It cause a death of 540animals including 13 Rhinos. The main reasons behind thiscalamity is the deforestation in the area of passing by ofBrahmaputra.6/11/2013Floods- Disaster Managment25
    • 2010 Ladakh Floods.It was 6th August 2010, when the series ofnatural disasters started to take place inLadakh, a regional part of J&K (Jammu andKashmir). It was accompanied withcloudburst, debris flows and Flash floods fromHimalayan. Causality was less than 300 buta great loss of property was reported. Areasof Leh were also affected and it caused a lossof total Rs. 133 crores INR.6/11/2013 Floods- Disaster Managment 26
    • 2005 : Maharashtra floodThis was the major and the most devastatingdisaster occurred in Maharashtra, mainlyengulfing areas ofMumbai, Chiplun, Khed, Kalyan, Ratnagiriand Raigad. The main problem arose with thepeople on the road and which caused a trafficjam and with it came the loss of people. Atotal of 5000 people were reported for thedeath toll. The date 26 July 2005 has beenmarked as one the BLACK DAY in the historyof Mumbai.6/11/2013 Floods- Disaster Managment 27
    • 2004 Bihar FloodBeing considered as a flood prone area, Bihar is again inthe list because of 2004 flood which it suffered. It wasstated that a total of 883 people lost their lives and morethan 3000 animals were killed. One of the mosthorrifying disaster caused almost a loss of Rs.1,03,049.60 Lakh. Rivers, primarily, Gandak, Kosi,Mahananda, Bagmati, Budhi had already crossed the redmark while on the other hand Ganga first time in itshistory crossed the red mark in Farrakka Barrage.6/11/2013 Floods- Disaster Managment 28
    • STATE PERSPECTIVE• Latest reports said 150villages in Srikakulam,Visakhapatnam, Krishna,Guntur and the east and westGodavari districts weresubmerged. Around 67,000people had been evacuated.Crops spread over 2.5 lakhhectares of farmland wereunder water and schoolsremained shut.(2012)6/11/2013 29Floods- Disaster Managment
    • 6/11/2013 30Floods- Disaster Managment
    • Contd…City name Rivers or streams FloodsVishakhapatnam Visakha Sarada,Gosthani, Champavathi,Tandava2005(cyclone),2004(tsunami)Vijayawada KrishnaVira,MunneruBudameruThammileru2006 (Ogni cyclone),2004 (Tsunami) 1977 /78 /90 / 96 (Cyclones)1983/ 86 /98 / 2005(Krishna), 1977(Diviseema Floods)6/11/2013 31
    • Local Perspective of Floods23RD AND 24TH AUGUST, 2000• 24cm rainfall for 24 hours• 77 slums washed away• 35,000 affected• 142 people killed• 90 residential areas under water (10 – 15 feet)• More than 100 colonies submerged in water28th September, 1908• 15,000 people killed• 19,000 houses demolished• 80,000 dwellings demolished• Average flood water level 15 – 20 feet• Construction of Osman Sagar (1914), Himayat Sagar (1927).6/11/2013 32Floods- Disaster Managment
    • Approaches & measure for long , shortterm protection from floods in India• Attempts to modify the floods: involves flood protection by physicalmeasures such as• Construction of embankments• Construction of detention reservoirs• Channel improvements etc.• Attempts to modify the susceptibility to flood damage: involves actiondesigned to reduce the vulnerability of property and other developmentalactivities in the flood plains to the flood hazard• Attempts to modify the loss burden: Consists of actions to modify theincidence of losses, by spreading them over a large segment ofcommunity.• Bearing the loss: Bearing the loss means living with floods
    • MEASURES
    • • FLOODS CAN NOT BE ABSOLUTELYCONTROLLED• FLOODS CAN ONLY BE MANAGED TOREDUCE FLOOD LOSSESFLOOD MANAGEMENTAPPROACH
    •  INDISCRIMINATE ENCROACHMENT INCREASING ECONOMIC ANDDEVELOPMENTAL ACTIVITIES IN FLOODPLAINS LACK OF REGULATIONS INADEQUATE DRAINAGE SYSTEM INADEQUATE MAINTENANCE LACK OF DISASTER PREPAREDNESSINCREASED VULNERABILITYCAUSES
    • • MODIFY THE FLOODS• MODIFY THE SUSCEPTIBILITY TOFLOOD DAMAGE• MODIFY THE LOSS BURDEN• BEAR THE LOSSFLOOD MANAGEMENTSTRATEGIES
    • FLOOD PLAIN ZONINGWATER SUPPLYFACTORYPOWER HOUSEUNIVERSITYRESIDENTIAL AREAGOVT. OFFICEHOSPITALNORMAL CHANNELPARKFREQUENT FLOODFLOOD ONCE IN 25 YEARSFLOOD ONCE IN 100 YEARSIII IIII III II
    • FLOOD PLAIN ZONINGPROHIBITIVERESTRICTIVEWARNING WARNINGRESTRICTIVEI II III II IRIVER CHANNEL
    • FLOOD FORECASTING AND WARNING DATA COLLECTION DATA TRANSMISSION DATA ANALYSIS & FORECAST FORMULATION DISSEMINATION OF FORECASTSTEPS
    • FLOOD FORECASTING• HYDROLOGICALRIVER WATER LEVELRIVER DISCHARGE• HYDROMETEOROLGICALRAINFALLOTHER RECIPITATIONeg. SNOW, HAIL ETC.DATA COLLECTION
    • FLOOD FORECASTING• WIRELESS• TELEPHONE• FAXDATA TRANSMISSION• SATELLITE• TELEGRAPH
    • FLOOD FORECASTING• CORRELATION• MATHEMATICALMODELSDATA ANALYSIS & FORECAST FORMULATION
    • FLOOD FORECASTINGDISSEMINATIONFORECASTCIVIL AUTHORITYOTHER AGENCIESPRESS, A I RDOORDARSHANOTHER USERSLOCAL REPRESENTATIVES
    • FLOOD FORECASTING AND WARNINGPRESENT SYSTEM - SCHEMATIC DIAGRAMWEATHER FORECASTSRIVER STAGE &DISCHARGE ATBASE STATIONRIVER STAGE &DISCHARGE ATFORECASTING STATIONS RAINFALLF.M. O. OF I.M.DFLOOD FORECASTINGCENTRES & CONTROL ROOMSFORMULATION OFFORECASTC.E., S.E.STATE GOVT.CONTROL ROOMPRESS RADIOP & TPOLICE FLOOD COMMITTEECIVIL AUTHORITIESENGG. AUTHORITIESDEFENCERAILWAYSINDUSTRIESF.M.O OF I.M.DREGIONAL OFFICESOF I.M.D.REGIONAL OFFICESOF I.M.D.DOORDARSHANCWC HQ MINISTRY OF WR
    • FLOOD MANAGEMENT• Use of Remote Sensing and GIS• Research and Development• Weather / Rainfall Forecasting• FF Modelling• Capacity Building• International Cooperation
    • FLOOD FORECASTING STATIONSINDIAGANGA B’PUTRA WESTFLOWINGGODAVARI EASTERNRIVERSKRISHNA MAHANADI BARAK852717 159 83 2
    • FLOOD FORECASTING STATIONSINDIA353223141511 1164 3 2 1242
    • FLOOD MANAGEMENTACTIVITIESPre floodDuring floodPost flood
    • FLOOD PLAIN ZONING• AN IMPORTANT NON-STRUCTURAL MEASURE.• REGULATES LAND USE IN FLOOD PLAINS TO RESTRICTDAMAGE BY FLOODS.• INVOLVES DEMARCATION OF ZONES IN FLOOD PLAINSCOMPATIBLE WITH FLOOD RISKS INVOLVED.CONCEPT
    • FLOOD PLAIN ZONINGPRIORITY - IACTIVITY LIMITED TO WATER LEVELS CORRESPONDING TO100 YEARS FLOOD FREQUENCY AND DRAINAGECONGESTION FOR 50 YEARS RAINFALL.ZONE REGULATION
    • FLOOD PLAIN ZONINGPRIORITY - IIACTIVITY LIMITED TO LEVELS CORRESPONDING TO25 YEARS FLOOD FREQUENCY AND DRAINAGE CONGESTIONFOR 10 YEARS RAINFALL FREQUENCY.ZONE REGULATION
    • FLOOD PLAIN ZONINGPRIORITY - IIILESS ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY ACTIVITY IN AREASVULNERABLE TO FREQUENT FLOODS.ZONE REGULATION
    • FLOOD MANAGEMENTFUTURE STRATEGIES• Focused Approach• Basin Wise Action Plan• Flood Plain Zoning• Role of Central Government• Funding of Planned Flood Management Works• Adequacy of Flood Cushion in Reservoirs
    • National Disaster Management Guidelines• To minimise vulnerability to floods and consequent loss of lives, livelihood systems, propertyand damage to infrastructure and public utilities• Flood damage assessment be made on a realistic and scientific basis and recorded basin-/sub-basin-wise.• Performance evaluation of a large number of FM schemes be carried out and their impacton the socio economic development of the protected area be assessed.• The use of flood plains be regulated and a suitable legislation for flood plain zoning beenacted and enforced.• Water Resources planning and construction be basin wise and basin organisations be set up.• Storages in various forms is an important component of the package of measures for FMand flood space in reservoirs be provided to the extent feasible and flood control notrelegated to a non- priority activity as against competing water requirements forhydropower and Irrigation purposes.• International dimensions of problem of floods be kept in mind and the GOI should play animportant role in the matter.• Requisite funds be made available for construction of new and maintenance of existingworks.• Emphasis be laid on research, education and training on FM.6/11/2013 Floods- Disaster Managment 55
    • 6/11/2013 56Floods- Disaster ManagmentCASE STUDY ON VIJAYAWADAFLOODS
    • Satellite map showing river Krishna in Vijayawada6/11/2013 57Floods- Disaster Managment
    • LOCATION MAP6/11/2013 58Map of India showing AP
    • Location• The city is situated at the foot of a low rangehills on the northern bank of the riverKrishna with its cardinal points as 16° 31’North latitude and 80° 37’ Eastlongitude, around 70 km away from the coast.6/11/2013 59Floods- Disaster Managment
    • Topographic Details• The land lay of Vijayawada is characterized by four canals,four hills and the holy river Krishna. Vijayawada whenapproached from Guntur is welcomed by the historic gatesacross the holy river Krishna. The way to Machilipatnamruns parallel to Budamerru canal and crosses two otherCanalsThere are four major hills:a) Indrakiladri hillb) Machavaramc) Gunadaa Hilld) Moghalrajapuram hille) Gollapalem Gattu Hill6/11/2013 60Floods- Disaster Managment
    • Krishna River• The River Krishna takes of its origin in the western Ghats at an elevationof (+) 1336 Mts and runs for a length of about 1400 Km and runsthrough Vijayawada city and joins at Bay of Bengal The length of KrishnaRiver up to Prakasam Barrage is about 1310 km and the length fromPrakasam Barrage to Puligadda Aqueduct is 64.00 kms.• The flow of the river is managed partially by the Nagarjuna Sagar damwhich is located to the west of Krishna District and Prakasam Barragewhich is located at the beginning of the city.6/11/2013 61Floods- Disaster Managment
    • Krishna river flow details and distance of dam to dam6/11/2013 62Floods- Disaster ManagmentThe Krishna Flood bank Above Prakasam Barrage is about 13KM andbellow flood bank is 6.40 Km which creates havoc in flood season which startsfrom June to December. Water release from barrage with 4,12,734to 10,94422 Cusecs is been observed over the years.
    • Details of Flood Banks In Krishna District6/11/2013 63Floods- Disaster Managment
    • Index plan of Krishna River Flood Banks6/11/2013 64Floods- Disaster Managment
    • Flood Bank locations
    • Year Wise observed Maximum Floods InKrishna River
    • Reasons for Krishna Flood This region receives maximum rainfall both by southwest and retreatingmonsoons. The primary reason for the flooding is the unauthorized settlements alongthe river which had taken place due to lack of planning and enforcement. Vijayawada is located on the line which separates the delta-irrigated lands Flood bank below barrage is about 6.40 Km which creates havoc in floodseason from June to December. High Water release at time from barrage with 4,12,734 to 10,94422Cusecs of water released in various years. Developmental activities like sluice connectivity to into the river is causingback water(3 sluices connected into river) Bund cutting for public private developmental activities (ex: sluice, stormwater drains) approach roads for bigger vehicles. Allotting the residential areas officially in flood zone. Ex: Police colony.
    • Contd…• trespassing the river bunds by people• damage to the river bunds by rodents• Breach occurrence and damages occurred to theflood bank with slips and erosion.• Negligence and helpless condition making peopleto stay at the houses even after passing thewarnings• With little authoritative power over thesettlements along the flood banks, the irrigationdepartment is unable to attend swiftly invulnerable areas.
    • Vulnerable groups to Krishna floods
    • Satellite imagery of vulnerable points at Krishna flood area6/11/2013 71Floods- Disaster Managment
    • DISASTER MANAGEMENT CYCLE6/11/2013 72Floods- Disaster ManagmentMitigationPreparednessResponseRecovery
    • Occurrence of disaster in Vijayawada (yearwise)6/11/2013 73Floods- Disaster Managment
    • MITIGATION Mitigation measures are very important phase of disaster management. They willhelp to reduce the loss and increase the capacity of people in managing thedisasters.The potential forecast outlook can be translated into early warning messages andinitiate preventive/preparedness actions.• As per the building byelaws 1981, no permission to construct a building on siteshell be granted , if the site is with in 9 meters of the highest water mark of atank• Further the authority may require the floor of the lowest styorey of such buildingto be raised above the normal minimum flood level of the adjoining to ground orto such other level as the authority may prescribe Shift or restrict the people livingin flood banks to safe place by providing all aminities• Krishna Bund strengthening at Krishna lanka, ranadheevinagar, Bhupesh Guptanagar• Krishna bund construction from police colony to yanamala kuduru• Raising the free board of Krishna flood bunds from 1.5 metre to 2 meters.• Shift the habitants of the flood zone of Budameru temporary or permanent to safeshelters after announcing the warning• Stop plowing / occupying the budameru bund from singh nagar to NSC Bosenagar6/11/2013 74Floods- Disaster Managment
    • Contd…• Providing Road side rain water drains at banadar road• Providing Road side rain water drains Ayyappanagar Road• Providing Under ground drainage and sewer lines andconstruction of sump cum [Pump house• Construction of Flood banks for Krishna River and BudameruFloods• Renovation or construction of safe schools and providing safetyequipment at schools• Provision of Food to lactating mothers and Infants and childrenunder 6 years reconstruction of rubbish or spoiled roads in manypoints of the city to protect form water stagnation• Identify the high milkproduction and other animal or birdproduction areas, based on that preference should be given toprovide all measures to those cattle and birds safety andmultiplication6/11/2013 75Floods- Disaster Managment
    • Before the Disaster During the Disaster After the Disaster• Learn warning signs and community alertsystemDuring a flood watch • Dont return home until authoritiesexpress itis safe to do so• Stockpile emergency building materials• Install check valves in sewer traps toprevent flood waters from backing up insewerdrains• Plan and practice an evacuation route• Have disaster supplies on hand• Develop an emergency communicationplanin case of separation• Ask an out-of-state relative to serve as the"family contact"• Teach family members how and when toturn off the gas, electricity, and water andteach children how and when to call 9-1-1• Ask your insurance agent about floodinsuranceIf indoors:• Turn on battery operated radio to getlatest emergency information• Get pre-assembled emergencysupplies• If told to leave, do so immediately.If outdoors:• Climb to high ground and stay there• Avoid walking through anyfloodwaters.• If in a car, turn around and go anotherway; if your car stalls, abandon itimmediately and climb to higherground.During an evacuation:• If advised to evacuate, do soimmediately to avoid flooded roads,being sure to follow recommendedevacuation routes and listen to radio forevacuation instructions• Help neighbors whom may need assistance• Use extreme caution when enteringbuildings• Inspect foundations for cracks or otherdamage and examine walls, floors, doors,andwindows to make sure that the building isnotin danger of collapsing• Watch out for animals, especiallypoisonoussnakes, that may have come into your homewith flood waters• Watch for loose plaster and ceilings thatcould fall• Take pictures of damage for insuranceclaims• Look for fire hazards• Throw away all food (including canned)thathas come in contact with flood waters• Pump out flooded basements gradually (~1/3 amount of water per day) to avoidstructural damage• Service damaged septic tanks, cesspools,pits, and leaching systems ASAP – damagedsewage systems are health hazards.6/11/2013 76Floods- Disaster Managment
    • PREPAREDNESS• State of being ready to react promptly and effectively in anevent of emergency (systematic way approach). Beingprepared for severity vulnerability of the disaster .Preparedness plan ( a holistic integrated approach) Specific Region , Area, Purpose Deploying Officers Incharge To Take Care WithEmergencies Strategy Development For Activities Likely To BeUndertaken At A Local Situation( Resource Analysis ToForce) Identify Government Bodies Which Can Respond Establishment Of Emergency Operating Centres6/11/2013 77Floods- Disaster Managment
    • Emergency Operating centre(EOC) /Control room :• An emergency operations center, or EOC, is a central command andcontrol facility responsible for carrying out the principles of emergencypreparedness and emergency management, or disaster managementfunctions at a strategic level in an emergency situation, and ensuring thecontinuity of operation of a company, political subdivision or otherorganization.6/11/2013 78Floods- Disaster Managment
    • Functions• Dealing with incoming emergency calls andprioritizing them taking the necessaryinformation from the caller• Recording details of incidents on computersystems• Providing necessary advice and guidance• Dispatching an emergency services team to dealwith the incident.• Maintaining contact with the team at the sceneof the incident to keep up to date with thesituation and ensure staff safety.6/11/2013 79Floods- Disaster Managment
    • Warning Stages6/11/2013 Floods- Disaster Managment 80Flood –Krishna1st-Warning - When flood level reaches12ft. at Prakasam2nd Warning - When flood level reaches15 ft. at Prakasam3rd Warning - When flood level reaches17 ft. at Prakasam
    • RESPONSEOccurs immediately / during following disasterDesigned to provide emergency assistance to thevictims of the event and reduce the likelihood ofoccurrence of secondary damage5 STAGE PROCESS1. Notification2. Immediate public safety3. Property security4. Public welfare5. Restoration6/11/2013 Floods- Disaster Managment 81
    • 6/11/2013 Floods- Disaster Managment 82
    • RECOVERY Final phase of disaster management cycle It is the longest phase out of all until system return tonormalcy / nearly to normalcy 2 TYPESlong termComplete redevelopment of damageshort termRestoration of vital services like watersupply, socialinfrastructure to minimum standards of operation andsafetyMike announcement of flood discharge and awarenessof people to evacuate the people to be submerged houses.6/11/2013 Floods- Disaster Managment 83
    • Water Supply• Identify the effected areas substitute with good and quality of water.• Keep the stock of Chlorine.• Identify and keep ready the list of sources of water in unaffected areas.• Check and Identification of low lying areas in the ward.• Check the water samples for residual chlorine, microbial substitutes and treataccordingly.Duties of Medical Teams in Rehabilitation Centers• List out the below 5 years age children’s and supply the milk and food (medicated).• List out the pregnancy ladies and take sufficient medical treatment.• List out the old / unhealthy people and take sufficient medical treatment.• Arrangements for fogging to control the mosquitoes and fly’s.6/11/2013 Floods- Disaster Managment 84
    • Shelter Management• Departments women and Child welfare, Revenue, Civil supplies and Municipal Corporationmust play a major role in Shelter management.• Adequate numbers of buildings or open space shall be identified where relief camps can beset up during emergency and updated in the plan.• The relief camps should provide with adequate provision of drinking water and bathing,sanitation and essential health-care facilities.• Adequate securing arrangements shall be made by local police.• Adequate lighting arrangements shall be made in the camp area including at water points,toilets and other common areas by the Municipal Engineering Department.• Explore the possibility of provision of food through community kitchens, provision ofeducation through the restoration of schools and anganwadis in effected areas.6/11/2013 Floods- Disaster Managment 85
    • Duties of Civil Supplies• Necessary free distribution of food shall be made to those who ever need inthe shelter and effected areas.• Wherever possible dry rations shall be provided for home cooking.• Community Kitchen for mass feeding shall be organized only for an affectedpeople do not have the means to cooks.• While providing food assistance, local food practices shall be kept in mindand commodities being provided must be carefully chosen, in consultationwith the affected population.• Food must be of good quality, safe to consume, and appropriate andacceptable to recipients.• Food distributed should be of appropriate quality and fit for humanconsumption.6/11/2013 Floods- Disaster Managment 86
    • Duties of Police Department• City Police officer will make arrangements for providing adequate number of mobileVHF sets up to sub-division/ward Police stations for meeting the exigencies.• List out trained persons responsible at sub division and ward level Police stations fordisaster management activities with details of address and phone numbers. Providethis list to Dist Collector and Municipal Commissioner and concerned linedepartments.• Adequate security arrangements shall be made by local police at the shelters andvulnerable areas.Duties of Irrigation Department• Flood preparedness plan for the city is to be prepared.• Update and inform about the floods at higher reaches.• Check your stores keep ready Inventory and instruments.• Keep ready the emergency material which ever required at the out falls at Krishnalanka river bank.• A report on activities and work status of Budameru drain should be submittedimmediately and an office of concerned work must be attended to the next meeting.6/11/2013 Floods- Disaster Managment 87
    • In ConclusionWhile we can never contract with the future oraccurately predict all of the consequences ofour actions and policies, policymakers mustextend their thinking about their impacts andthe impacts of private entities beyond thelocal, the near term, the likely, and the recentlynewsworthy.
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