Using Technology to Engage in Personal & Professional Development: Personal Learning Environments & You<br />Aisha Jackson...
Objectives<br />Define Personal Learning Environments (PLEs). <br />Review learning theories that support the use of PLEs<...
Where do you go when you’re ready to learn something?<br />
PLEs<br />Figure 1 Continuum of Learning from Formal to Informal (OECD, 2010)<br />
What are Personal/Professional Learning Environments? <br />An approach to learning, personal and professional development...
What’s in a PLE?<br />
Management Autonomy  Empowerment  Access<br />
Andragogy<br />The art and science of helping adults learn<br />(Knowles, 1980)<br />
Assumptions about Adult Learners<br />Self-directed<br />Accumulated a reservoir of life experiences – rich resource for l...
Assumptions about Adult Learners & PLEs<br />A PLE is an approach to learning where an individual draws upon an array of r...
Assumptions about Adult Learners & PLEs<br />PLEs can be made up of traditional learning resources like books and can also...
Assumptions about Adult Learners & PLEs<br />The tools in a PLE can be used to contribute knowledge, “answer questions, pr...
Self-Directed Learning & PLEs<br />PLEs are an essential tool for women as it provides a means for them to not only expand...
Learning is situated.<br />Learning is a function of the activity, context and culture in which it occurs. <br />Lave& Wen...
A community of practice is the situation.<br />Learning takes place in all different contexts and situations but in a comm...
Situated Learning and PLEs<br />Allows for life long learning <br />Allows for a method of learning from multiple people, ...
Situated Learning and PLEs<br />Developing a PLE is placing yourself in a situation and building a community of learners w...
Jacie’s Personal Learning Environment<br />
Considerations<br />
Time<br />
Be selective of the tools you use<br />http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=2441&picture=tool-kit<br />
Be your own filter<br />
Changing Landscape<br />Situational<br />Transient<br />http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=2435&pict...
Information Literacy<br />http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=1983&picture=old-typewriter<br />
Questions & Discussion<br />
Works Cited<br />Dependent or citizen? Women’s transitions from welfare to work by C. L. Andruske<br />Situated Learning: ...
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CU Women Succeeding-PLE

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PowerPoint of PLE presentation shared at the CU Women's Succeeding Conference - February 25, 2011

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  • Amanda – Introduction and welcome
  • To help us start exploring what exactly PLEs are, I’d like to begin by asking a question. When you need to learn something new, where do you go to? Take responses down as participants respond. Your responses to that question can be organized into three categories.
  • Formal learning opportunitiesNon-formal learning opportunities and Informal learning opportunities. Formal learning - Teacher Education programsInformation learning – over coffee, upon reflection The Internet and the tools, services and communities it allows, provides many opportunities for accessing learning.PLEs fall in the middle of this continuum.
  • So what are PLEs? The approach to learning is self-directed. It doesn’t rely on the structure provided in formal learning opportunities and it’s not informal because you choose what your needs and interests are and use tools(mainly available on the Internet) to help support your learning.
  • Tools provide context, answer questions and illustrate processes. Tools shown merely examples of the types of tools.Tools that make up my PLE might be different from yours. Services can be used to access information, store it, manage (the vast amounts of information on the Internet) and provide a means to contribute to others. Contributing to the community aspect of PLEs can make visible an individual’s knowledge, skills and competencies not earned formally. Collaboration (for example, research communities that can keep you abreast of the latest trends, information, research, etc. within the community). Build your own learning communities within them. Provide a way for others to provide feedback on your own contributions (should you blog for example) but may also serve as teachers, sharing information you may find meaningful while also helping you to evaluate the multitude of information available.
  • Let’s take a look at my PLE. I use the following tools. I manage my tools using Google reader. I build communities within my tools. For example, I use a social bookmarking tool called delicious. The advantage to delicious is that when I find a particularly useful resource on the Internet, I can bookmark it so that I can access it from any computer. That bookmark can be tagged or given a keyword that others using delicious can access. I can access the keywords of others or I can create a network of other instructional designers, for example, and we can share our bookmarks among one another.
  • The great advantage of PLEs are that they facilitate autonomy. It gives you the freedom to study using the tools you want, when you want and how you want. Not something that formal education provides. In this way an individual can be empowered. They are not dependent on others for their information. And finally it allows you to those who are unable to access formal learning to organize the learning opportunities afforded by the Internet. These are just a few of the benefits of PLEs. There are others related to how adults learn and Jacie is going to review those with us…
  • Use us as an example coming to CU for job.
  • The focused, problem-centered, immediate application piece of andragogy….brings us to a situated learning theory. In Jacie’s example of women have to learn based on situation they find themselves in
  • You can apply the learning in the same place that you gained the knowledge.Like on the job training.
  • By commenting, communication….
  • CU Women Succeeding-PLE

    1. 1. Using Technology to Engage in Personal & Professional Development: Personal Learning Environments & You<br />Aisha Jackson, Amanda McAndrew&Jacie Moriyama<br />Academic Technology Consultants<br />University of Colorado at BoulderCU Women’s Succeeding: Annual Faculty Development Symposium<br />University of Colorado at Colorado SpringsFebruary 25, 2011<br />
    2. 2. Objectives<br />Define Personal Learning Environments (PLEs). <br />Review learning theories that support the use of PLEs<br />Describe tools that could be used to build a PLE. <br />Discuss the benefits and considerations of using web-based resources to support personal and professional development. <br />
    3. 3. Where do you go when you’re ready to learn something?<br />
    4. 4. PLEs<br />Figure 1 Continuum of Learning from Formal to Informal (OECD, 2010)<br />
    5. 5. What are Personal/Professional Learning Environments? <br />An approach to learning, personal and professional development directed by your own needs and interests<br />Facilitated by a collection of tools<br />(EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative, 2009)<br />
    6. 6. What’s in a PLE?<br />
    7. 7.
    8. 8. Management Autonomy  Empowerment  Access<br />
    9. 9. Andragogy<br />The art and science of helping adults learn<br />(Knowles, 1980)<br />
    10. 10. Assumptions about Adult Learners<br />Self-directed<br />Accumulated a reservoir of life experiences – rich resource for learning<br />Learning needs to be closely related to changing social roles<br />Problem- centered and interested in immediate application<br />
    11. 11. Assumptions about Adult Learners & PLEs<br />A PLE is an approach to learning where an individual draws upon an array of resources to guide their own personal and professional development. <br /> Assumption: The adult learner is independent and self-directed.<br />
    12. 12. Assumptions about Adult Learners & PLEs<br />PLEs can be made up of traditional learning resources like books and can also comprise of (web-based) resources such as social networks. <br />Assumption: Adult learners have an accumulation of life experiences that is a rich resource for learning.<br />
    13. 13. Assumptions about Adult Learners & PLEs<br />The tools in a PLE can be used to contribute knowledge, “answer questions, provide context, and illustrate processes” (EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative, 2009, ¶5). <br /> Assumption: Learning needs to be closely related to changing social roles AND are interested in immediate application.<br />
    14. 14. Self-Directed Learning & PLEs<br />PLEs are an essential tool for women as it provides a means for them to not only expand their learning but also network and engage in (online) communities in both their personal and professional lives. <br /> Self Directed Learning: ‘Women on welfare are, in fact, self-directed learners, and in the process, they act as political agents for themselves and for other women.’ (Andruske, 1997)<br />
    15. 15. Learning is situated.<br />Learning is a function of the activity, context and culture in which it occurs. <br />Lave& Wenger (1990)<br />
    16. 16. A community of practice is the situation.<br />Learning takes place in all different contexts and situations but in a community of practice you can gain and apply the knowledge in the same place.<br />
    17. 17. Situated Learning and PLEs<br />Allows for life long learning <br />Allows for a method of learning from multiple people, places, and communities.<br />Creates a space to be active in a community of practice <br />
    18. 18. Situated Learning and PLEs<br />Developing a PLE is placing yourself in a situation and building a community of learners where you can: <br />Receive information <br />Organize information<br />Reflect on the information<br />Contribute to the community <br />Collaborate with the community<br />
    19. 19.
    20. 20. Jacie’s Personal Learning Environment<br />
    21. 21. Considerations<br />
    22. 22. Time<br />
    23. 23. Be selective of the tools you use<br />http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=2441&picture=tool-kit<br />
    24. 24. Be your own filter<br />
    25. 25. Changing Landscape<br />Situational<br />Transient<br />http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=2435&picture=hammer-and-spanner<br />
    26. 26. Information Literacy<br />http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=1983&picture=old-typewriter<br />
    27. 27. Questions & Discussion<br />
    28. 28. Works Cited<br />Dependent or citizen? Women’s transitions from welfare to work by C. L. Andruske<br />Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation by J. Lave & E. Wenger<br />Context and main concepts by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development<br />7 Things you should know about Personal Learning Environments by EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative <br />The modern practice of adult education: From pedagogy to andragogy by Malcolm Knowles<br />

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