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Webcast: Building and Growing an Amazing Product Management Team

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Thanks everyone who participated in this webcast from The Association of International Product Marketing and Management (AIPMM). ...

Thanks everyone who participated in this webcast from The Association of International Product Marketing and Management (AIPMM).

This presentation discusses how to turn your product management team into high-performing superstars. This includes how to recruit and keep great talent, balancing your team, leveraging people's strengths and minimizing their weaknesses, assessing core skill and knowledge to determine gaps, and creating a growth plan for your group. If you currently manage product managers, or are thinking of going into management, this presentation gives you critical information that will allow you to be much more successful.

Who Should Attend
CXOs, VP and Directors of Product Management and Product Marketing

About the Speaker
Brian Lawley is the CEO and Founder of the 280 Group, the world's leading Product Management Consulting and training firm. He is the author five best-selling Product Management books, The Phenomenal Product Manager, Expert Product Management, 42 Rules of Product Management, 42 Rules of Product Marketing and Optimal Product Process and is the former President of the Silicon Valley Product Management Association. He was awarded the Association of International Product Marketing Management award for Thought Leadership in Product Management, and has been featured on World Business Review, the Silicon Valley Business Report. Brian's career spans over 25 years in Product Management, including having defined and launched over 50 products.

About AIPMM
The AIPMM is the hub of all things product management. It is where product professionals go for answers. With members in over 65 countries, it is the worldwide certifying body of product team professionals.

It is the world's largest professional organization of product managers, brand managers, product marketing managers and other product team professionals who are responsible for guiding their organizations, or clients, through a constantly changing business landscape.

AIPMM's certification programs are internationally recognized because they allow product professionals to demonstrate their expertise and provide corporate members an assurance that their product management and marketing teams are operating at a high competency level.

Visit www.aipmm.com.

Upcoming Webinars: http://aipmm.com/aipmm_webinars/
Subscribe: http://www.aipmm.com/subscribe
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/aipmm
Membership: http://www.aipmm.com/join.php
Certification: http://aipmm.com/html/certification
Articles: http://www.aipmm.com/html/newsletter/article.php

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  • AIPMM was founded in 1998. It provides professional development, training, and certification to those involved in product management, such as product managers and developers, marketing managers, brand managers, project managers, and many more.
  • The Certified Innovation Leader body of knowledge and credential is aligned with The Association of International Product Marketing and Management. AIPMM was founded in 1998. It provides professional development, training, and certification to those involved in product management, such as product managers and developers, marketing managers, brand managers, project managers, and many more. The certified innovation leader credential is one of four certifications provided by AIPMM. The others include: certified product manager, certified product marketing manager, and agile certified product manager.
  • Director of PM will prioritize markets and segmentsPM – understand customer needs and develop business cases for solving customer problems at the product levelPMM – understand features and benefits and how those tie to customer problem"marketing programs" means PR, advertising, direct, website, events, etc. -- the whole marketing mixWhoe Product Definition deals with the actual product, the packaging and out of box experience, and all necessary supporting srervices (such as support, accessoriesAs with anything that tries to assign tasks with roles, this is not set in stone. The goal is to list the most logical owner, but every company needs to determine how to split these tasks based on skill sets of its employees and where in the lifecycle a product is. So I think any framework comes with caveats.As far as the location of “markets” at the top and “customers” at the bottom. The Dir., PM, and PMM must understand both, but I was trying to suggest the Dir. Concerns themselves more with markets. Which markets and market segments to be in, which are growing, which are shrinking, which are changing, do we grow by taking our product to a new market or by creating new products for an existing market? The PM and PMMs are working very closely with customers and finding shared problems that make a market. But they start bottoms up and the dir, starts tops down. Let me know if this is lost or confusing.I think the side bars are clearer, but let me know. But the main internal interface for PM is development and the main internal interface for PMM is basically every other department. I’ve kept “inbound” and “outbound.” I’ve always found this notation helpful. It is not to say the boundaries are firm between all parties, but that primary inbound responsibility is the PM and primary outbound is the PMM. For me, inbound is what I call listening activities. Those things that feed into the product until it is built. Outbound is a broadcasting activity letting the world know about the product and stepping the target market through the awareness, consideration, trial, purchase, and evangelism cycle. However, I’d like to hear more thoughts on this. I think barbara and Jim makes some good points, there are some inconsistencies and is this label actionable? Is there a better label? Should there be no label?Pricing – I kept that with the director. I agree the PM needs to have input into it and target price is a design input. But if someone has to own it, I think it is the director. I have not added the term VOC but have the idea. Let me know you think VOC should be there.I’ve added competitive analysis to all three roles (Dir = company and financial analysis), (PM=product analysis), (PMM = price, promotion, and place analysis). Does this make sense?I was using the term “market requirement” and “PRD” which was inconsistent. I know use “market requirement” and “product requirement”. FYI – aim is introducing “customer requirement” which is the idea that each person has their requirements. When enough share the same thing it is a market requirement. s, warranty, value added services.)
  • Director of PM will prioritize markets and segmentsPM – understand customer needs and develop business cases for solving customer problems at the product levelPMM – understand features and benefits and how those tie to customer problem"marketing programs" means PR, advertising, direct, website, events, etc. -- the whole marketing mixWhoa Product Definition deals with the actual product, the packaging and out of box experience, and all necessary supporting services (such as support, accessoriesAs with anything that tries to assign tasks with roles, this is not set in stone. The goal is to list the most logical owner, but every company needs to determine how to split these tasks based on skill sets of its employees and where in the lifecycle a product is. So I think any framework comes with caveats.As far as the location of “markets” at the top and “customers” at the bottom. The Dir., PM, and PMM must understand both, but I was trying to suggest the Dir. Concerns themselves more with markets. Which markets and market segments to be in, which are growing, which are shrinking, which are changing, do we grow by taking our product to a new market or by creating new products for an existing market? The PM and PMMs are working very closely with customers and finding shared problems that make a market. But they start bottoms up and the dir, starts tops down. Let me know if this is lost or confusing.I think the side bars are clearer, but let me know. But the main internal interface for PM is development and the main internal interface for PMM is basically every other department. I’ve kept “inbound” and “outbound.” I’ve always found this notation helpful. It is not to say the boundaries are firm between all parties, but that primary inbound responsibility is the PM and primary outbound is the PMM. For me, inbound is what I call listening activities. Those things that feed into the product until it is built. Outbound is a broadcasting activity letting the world know about the product and stepping the target market through the awareness, consideration, trial, purchase, and evangelism cycle. However, I’d like to hear more thoughts on this. I think barbara and jim makes some good points, there are some inconsistencies and is this label actionable? Is there a better label? Should there be no label?Pricing – I kept that with the director. I agree the PM needs to have input into it and target price is a design input. But if someone has to own it, I think it is the director. I have not added the term VOC but have the idea. Let me know you think VOC should be there.I’ve added competitive analysis to all three roles (Dir = company and financial analysis), (PM=product analysis), (PMM = price, promotion, and place analysis). Does this make sense?I was using the term “market requirement” and “PRD” which was inconsistent. I know use “market requirement” and “product requirement”. FYI – aipmm is introducing “customer requirement” which is the idea that each person has their requirements. When enough share the same thing it is a market requirement. s, warranty, value added services.)
  • Director of PM will prioritize markets and segmentsPM – understand customer needs and develop business cases for solving customer problems at the product levelPMM – understand features and benefits and how those tie to customer problem"marketing programs" means PR, advertising, direct, website, events, etc. -- the whole marketing mixWhoe Product Definition deals with the actual product, the packaging and out of box experience, and all necessary supporting srervices (such as support, accessorieAs with anything that tries to assign tasks with roles, this is not set in stone. The goal is to list the most logical owner, but every company needs to determine how to split these tasks based on skill sets of its employees and where in the lifecycle a product is. So I think any framework comes with caveats.As far as the location of “markets” at the top and “customers” at the bottom. The Dir., PM, and PMM must understand both, but I was trying to suggest the Dir. Concerns themselves more with markets. Which markets and market segments to be in, which are growing, which are shrinking, which are changing, do we grow by taking our product to a new market or by creating new products for an existing market? The PM and PMMs are working very closely with customers and finding shared problems that make a market. But they start bottoms up and the dir, starts tops down. Let me know if this is lost or confusing.I think the side bars are clearer, but let me know. But the main internal interface for PM is development and the main internal interface for PMM is basically every other department. I’ve kept “inbound” and “outbound.” I’ve always found this notation helpful. It is not to say the boundaries are firm between all parties, but that primary inbound responsibility is the PM and primary outbound is the PMM. For me, inbound is what I call listening activities. Those things that feed into the product until it is built. Outbound is a broadcasting activity letting the world know about the product and stepping the target market through the awareness, consideration, trial, purchase, and evangelism cycle. However, I’d like to hear more thoughts on this. I think barbara and jim makes some good points, there are some inconsistencies and is this label actionable? Is there a better label? Should there be no label?Pricing – I kept that with the director. I agree the PM needs to have input into it and target price is a design input. But if someone has to own it, I think it is the director. I have not added the term VOC but have the idea. Let me know you think VOC should be there.I’ve added competitive analysis to all three roles (Dir = company and financial analysis), (PM=product analysis), (PMM = price, promotion, and place analysis). Does this make sense?I was using the term “market requirement” and “PRD” which was inconsistent. I know use “market requirement” and “product requirement”. FYI – aipmm is introducing “customer requirement” which is the idea that each person has their requirements. When enough share the same thing it is a market requirement. s, warranty, value added services.)
  • Director of PM will prioritize markets and segmentsPM – understand customer needs and develop business cases for solving customer problems at the product levelPMM – understand features and benefits and how those tie to customer problem"marketing programs" means PR, advertising, direct, website, events, etc. -- the whole marketing mixWhoe Product Definition deals with the actual product, the packaging and out of box experience, and all necessary supporting srervices (such as support, accessorieAs with anything that tries to assign tasks with roles, this is not set in stone. The goal is to list the most logical owner, but every company needs to determine how to split these tasks based on skill sets of its employees and where in the lifecycle a product is. So I think any framework comes with caveats.As far as the location of “markets” at the top and “customers” at the bottom. The Dir., PM, and PMM must understand both, but I was trying to suggest the Dir. Concerns themselves more with markets. Which markets and market segments to be in, which are growing, which are shrinking, which are changing, do we grow by taking our product to a new market or by creating new products for an existing market? The PM and PMMs are working very closely with customers and finding shared problems that make a market. But they start bottoms up and the dir, starts tops down. Let me know if this is lost or confusing.I think the side bars are clearer, but let me know. But the main internal interface for PM is development and the main internal interface for PMM is basically every other department. I’ve kept “inbound” and “outbound.” I’ve always found this notation helpful. It is not to say the boundaries are firm between all parties, but that primary inbound responsibility is the PM and primary outbound is the PMM. For me, inbound is what I call listening activities. Those things that feed into the product until it is built. Outbound is a broadcasting activity letting the world know about the product and stepping the target market through the awareness, consideration, trial, purchase, and evangelism cycle. However, I’d like to hear more thoughts on this. I think barbara and jim makes some good points, there are some inconsistencies and is this label actionable? Is there a better label? Should there be no label?Pricing – I kept that with the director. I agree the PM needs to have input into it and target price is a design input. But if someone has to own it, I think it is the director. I have not added the term VOC but have the idea. Let me know you think VOC should be there.I’ve added competitive analysis to all three roles (Dir = company and financial analysis), (PM=product analysis), (PMM = price, promotion, and place analysis). Does this make sense?I was using the term “market requirement” and “PRD” which was inconsistent. I know use “market requirement” and “product requirement”. FYI – aipmm is introducing “customer requirement” which is the idea that each person has their requirements. When enough share the same thing it is a market requirement. s, warranty, value added services.)

Webcast: Building and Growing an Amazing Product Management Team Webcast: Building and Growing an Amazing Product Management Team Presentation Transcript

  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comAIPMM Webinar Serieswww.aipmm.com
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.com
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comFounded 1998World’s largest professional association for productmanagement, product marketing and brand managementProvides professional development and certification• Certified Product Manager• Certified Product Marketing Manager• Agile Certified Product Manager• Certified Innovation Leader• Certified Brand Manager
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comAIPMM CertificationsAIPMM offers globally recognized certifications:• Certified Product Manager (CPM®)• Certified Product Marketing Manager (CPMM®)• Agile Certified Product Manager (ACPM®)• Certified Innovation Leader (CIL®)• Certified Brand Manager (CBM®)
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comParticipate and Win!• Product Management LifeCycle Toolkit™• One e-copy of each book5
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comHector: @hmdelcastilloAIPMM: @AIPMMBrian: @the280groupTweet!
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comToday’s SpeakerModerator:Hector Del Castillo, CPM, CPMM, PMPPresenter:Brian LawleyCEO & Founder,280 Groupcontact@280group.com@the280group
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comFEATURED PRESENTATION
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comAgenda• About• Three Pillars of Optimal PM• Eight step process for teams• Q&A• Drawing!
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comHousekeeping• Slide URL at www.280group.com/pmteam.pdf• Q&A at end• Drawing– Product Management LifeCycle Toolkit™– One copy of each book10
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comSeven Phase LifeCycle Book- Everyone gets a copy- http://tinyurl.com/freeoppbook- Please share!
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comHelping companies deliver products that delight theircustomers and produce massive profitsAssessment – Training – Certification – Consulting – Contractors – Templates – Mentoring – Books™
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comOptimal Product Management
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comOptimal Product Management
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comEight Steps: Build & Grow a Team1. Brand clarity2. Role clarity3. Assess current team4. Balance team5. Recruit smart6. Growth plan7. Boost productivity8. Make it stick
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comYour Brand as a Manager/Team• Team performance/perception• How you manage:– Tough but fair?– Always support your team?– Motivating coach?– Mentor?– Hands-off vs. micromanaging?• Leadership perception
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comRole Clarity• Who does what• What you don’t do• NOT product janitors• DACI– Driver– Approver– Contributor– Informed• EvangelizeDownload the Product Management Manifesto at www.280group.com/pmmanifesto.pdf.
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comRoles and responsibilitiesProduct ManagementInbound• Customer research and insights• Business case analysis• Positioning• Product Road mapping• Market req. & prioritization• Whole product definition• Differentiation and desirability• Feature/cost/schedule tradeoffs• Develop product req. w/ eng. & UX• Competitive analysis(product and market position)• Beta programsProduct MarketingOutbound• Launch and marketing plans• Features and benefits• Messaging by market and role• Training• Sales tools• Product Launch• Marketing program• Success stories• Market analysis• Competitive analysis(price, promotion, and place)Director of Product ManagementPortfolio PlanningStrategic planning ● resource allocation ● PLC strategy ● pricing strategy ● competitiveanalysis (company & financial level)Product Management vs. Product Marketing White Paper: www.280group.com “Resource Central” section
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.com
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comCommunicate the Role of PMProduct Management Manifesto: www.280group.com “Resource Central” section
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comAssessing Current Team• Inherited Players• Usually wide skill variation• Some trained, some not• Varying backgrounds
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comBaseline Skill Set• Match responsibilities• Rank each team member• Optimal PM assessment• Identify areas of weakness
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comDon’t Forget the Soft Skills• Influencing• Negotiation• Communication• Mediation• Leadership
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comBalancing your team• Determine work to be done• Leverage people’s strengths• Minimize their weaknesses• Don’t put a catcher in the outfield• Match with engineering teams• Determine if/how to add/subtract
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comRight Person for the Job• Skills• Interest• Team fit• Needs
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comGet Honest About Bad Seeds• Eliminate:– “B” or lower players– Jaded/Cranky/Cynical– Not cut out for PM• Strategy:– Decide if worth your time and effort– Be honest with them either way– If so, give them a fair shot– Fire earlier than later
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comRecruit Smart• Poach– Within your company– From your career• 280 Group Resource Central– PM Profession section– Job descriptions, etc.– Best PM job lists• Build your personal network– PMAs– LinkedIn groups
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comHire Those Who Can Overtake You• Your brand = your team• Mentors pull, teams push• Look for loyalty
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comWho to Recruit• Leadership• “Responsibility” gene• Communication• Ability to learn market & technology• Core PM skills
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comCrucial ElementsProductivityAttitudeLeadership!
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comGrowth Plan• Training• Certifications• Books• Weekly/monthly team webinars• Brown bag lunch series• Quarterly PM Summit• Chapter a week• Mentoring
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comRewards & Incentives• Positive vs. Negative Motivation• Get personal• Build a plan with the employee
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comBoost Productivity• Master Email• Master Outlook• Work From One To-do List• Prioritize Using a System• Master Meetings• Dont Reinvent the Wheel• Use & Master Great Tools• Learn to be Politely Rude• Stick to a Routine• Get HelpSource: 280 Group PM Productivity Seminar: How to Get Twice as Much Done in Half the Time
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comArm the Team With Tools• Standard templates– Product Management LifeCycle Toolkit– PM Office• Software Solutions• Manual/Handbook• Portal
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comMaking it stick• Share plan• Management support• Communicate to peers• Tie into reviews• Carrots & sticks• Communicate success!
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comGive the Team Credit• True leadership• Take the blame• Don’t worry
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.com37Go to www.280group.com in the “Resource Central” section.
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comQ&AModerator:Hector Del Castillo, CPM, CPMM, PMPPresenter:Brian LawleyCEO & Founder,280 Groupcontact@280group.com@the280group
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comDrawing!• Product Management LifeCycle Toolkit™• One copy of each book
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comUpcoming CoursesCourse & Location Dates Days TimeACPM® Certification Prep Course & ExamMcLean, VA May 13, 2013M 8:30 am – 5 pmCPM® Certification Prep Course & ExamMcLean, VA May 14-15, 2013 T, W 8:30 am – 5 pmCPMM® Certification Prep Course & ExamMcLean, VA May 16-17, 2013 Th, F 8:30 am – 5 pmRegister for these courses here: http://bit.ly/Y9val2.280 Group Courses in Austin, New York, Canada, London.Self-study courses available too!
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comUpcoming CoursesCourse & Location Dates TimeCIL® Certification Prep Course & ExamKuala Lumpur, Malaysia Jun 5-6, 2013 9 am – 6 pmCPM® Certification Prep Course & ExamDubai, UAESingaporeKuala Lumpur, MalaysiaAmman, JordanMay 19-23, 2013May 27-29, 2013Jun 3-4, 2013Jun 17-18, 20138 am – 5pm8 am – 5 pm9 am – 6 pm8 am – 5 pmCPMM® Certification Prep Course & ExamDubai, UAESingaporeAmman, JordanMay 26-30, 2013May 30-Jun 1, 2013Jun 19-20, 20138 am – 5 pm8 am – 5 pm8 am – 5 pmFollow the links provided to get more information regarding these courses.
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comFor More Information About• AIPMM membership benefits• Certification courses near you• How to prepare to take a certification examHector Del Castillo, CPM, CPMMSenior Product Innovation Consultanthmdelcastillo@aipmm.comlinkd.in/hdelcastillo
  • © AIPMM 2013 www.aipmm.comPlease Join Us Again!AIPMM Webinar Series:Five Product Roadmap Traps (And How to Avoid Them), May 17, 12 pm EThttp://aipmm.com/aipmm_webinars/Global Product Management Talk:http://www.blogtalkradio.com/prodmgmttalkStay Informed!Newsletter: http://www.aipmm.com/subscribeLinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/aipmmMembership: http://www.aipmm.com/join.phpCertification: http://aipmm.com/html/certification/