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Writing for the Web

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Transcript

  • 1. Writing for the Web AIM 2009 Rob Swick Twitter/swicker
  • 2.  
  • 3. Overview
    • Topics
    • Welcome to my Interweb!
    • What is good web writing?
    • Study: what matters?
    • Content & structure
    • Organization
    • Authentic voice
    • Search writing
    • Specialize locations (email, social media)
  • 4. Welcome to my Interweb!
    • Processing Web Copy
    • people don’t read; they skim
    • lower case letters more quickly processed
    • ‘ get it done’ copy over ‘marketese’
    • look to highlights to orient
    • expect questions answered – now!
  • 5. Welcome to my Interweb!
    • Good Web Writing is
    • Concise
    • Scannable
    • Well structured
    • Authentic
  • 6. Welcome to my Interweb!
    • Common errors...
    • Flowery language
    • Marketing speak
    • Too few organizers
    • Overly-long pages
  • 7. Study: Does it really make a difference?
    • Four factors:
    • Objective text
    • Scannable text
    • Precise text
    • Together
  • 8. Measures
    • Using a core set of text the study showed how modifying text affected users:
    • Task Time – time to find answers
    • Errors – on questions after
    • Memory – memory for facts
    • Time to Recall Structure – time to recall site org.
    • Subjective Satisfaction
  • 9. Standard Text Nebraska is filled with internationally recognized attractions that draw large crowds of people every year, without fail. In 1996, some of the most popular places were Fort Robinson State Park (355,000 visitors), Scotts Bluff National Monument (132,166), Arbor Lodge State Historical Park & Museum (100,000), Carhenge (86,598), Stuhr Museum of the Prairie Pioneer (60,002), and Buffalo Bill Ranch State Historical Park (28,446). 0%
  • 10. M1. Objective language Nebraska has several attractions. In 1996, some of the most-visited places were Fort Robinson State Park (355,000 visitors), Scotts Bluff National Monument (132,166), Arbor Lodge State Historical Park & Museum (100,000), (86,598), Stuhr Museum of the Prairie Pioneer (60,002), and Buffalo Bill Ranch State Historical Park (28,446). 27%
  • 11. M2. Scannable Layout
    • Nebraska is filled with internationally recognized attractions that draw large crowds of people every year, without fail. In 1996, some of the most popular places were:
    • Fort Robinson State Park (355,000 visitors)
    • Scotts Bluff National Monument (132,166)
    • Arbor Lodge State Historical Park & Museum (100,000)
    • Carhenge(86,598)
    • Stuhr Museum of the Prairie Pioneer (60,002)
    • Buffalo Bill Ranch State Historical Park (28,446).
    • 47%
  • 12. M3. Concise text In 1996, six of the best-attended attractions in Nebraska were Fort Robinson State Park, Scotts Bluff National Monument, Arbor Lodge State Historical Park & Museum, Carhenge, Stuhr Museum of the Prairie Pioneer, and Buffalo Bill Ranch State Historical Park. 58%
  • 13. M4. Combined version
    • In 1996, six of the most-visited places in Nebraska were:
    • Fort Robinson State Park
    • Scotts Bluff National Monument
    • Arbor Lodge State Historical Park
    • Museum Carhenge Stuhr Museum of the Prairie Pioneer Buffalo Bill Ranch State Historical Park
    • 124%
  • 14. Results
    • Result summary (% improvement):
    • Objective 27%
    • Scannable 47%
    • Concise 58%
    • Combined 124%
    • None of these alone has even near the impact of all together.
  • 15. Content and Structure
    • Site Script Preparation:
    • Site Map
    • Site Page Content Outline
    • May include
      • SEO meta tags
      • Page visuals/media guide
      • Graphic descriptions
      • Other instructions
      • Links
      • Footer (if home page)
  • 16. Creating Site Structure
  • 17. Clear Content Structure
  • 18. Know where the text is going! Serif font San serif font
  • 19. SEO: Research is Key
  • 20. SEO Terms: Breadth & Planning
  • 21. Home Page Goals
    • Answer 3 Questions:
    • Who are you? (am I in the right place?)
    • Why are you good? (should I stay)
    • What do you want me to do?
  • 22. Social Media has Attitude
  • 23.
    • Voice changes depending on media:
    • art of short communication
    • community awareness is part of writing
    • authenticity even more important
    • more is more (multiplies)
  • 24. Authentic Voice
    • Benefits of Authentic Voice
    • Engages with emotion
    • Direct
    • Better search match
    • More fact-oriented
    • Higher trust level
    • Challenges
    • ??
  • 25. Email & CTAs
    • Some similar elements to home pages but:
    • More promotional
    • Skimmed
    • Focus, relevance vital (timely and anticipated)
    • Other important features:
    • Good subject line
    • CTA crucial/offers

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