Youth HIV/AIDS Education 2.0: Applying New Media to Extend the Reach of HIV/AIDS Programs
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Youth HIV/AIDS Education 2.0: Applying New Media to Extend the Reach of HIV/AIDS Programs

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Presentation by Miguel Gomez about Youth and New media given at the 9/21/10 amfAR Congressional Briefing, "HIV/AIDS and Youth: Moving Toward an HIV-Free Generation"

Presentation by Miguel Gomez about Youth and New media given at the 9/21/10 amfAR Congressional Briefing, "HIV/AIDS and Youth: Moving Toward an HIV-Free Generation"

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  • “Socioeconomic status is one area where cell phone ownership rates vary, with teens from lower income families less likely to own a mobile phone. More than half (59%) of teens in households earning less than $30,000 annually have a cell phone, while more than three quarters of teens from wealthier families own one. ” http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Social-Media-and-Young-Adults/Part-2.aspx?view=all#
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  • 4% of adolescents ages 12 to 17 have sent sexually suggestive photos or videos on their personal cell phones 15 % of adolescents ages 12 to 17 have received sexually suggestive photos or videos on their personal cell phones. 3 in 10 young people were involved in some type of sexting
  • No Phone Zone is a programme developed by Oprah Winfrey and released on March 6, 2010, about how to teach people not to talk or text on their cell phone while they are driving. The program was shown at the beginning and end of The Oprah Winfrey Show and was sponsored by Liberty Mutual and Sprint . http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_Phone_Zone http://www.oprah.com/oprahradio/Teen-Drivers Today's teenagers are masters at high-tech multitasking, juggling cell phones, text messaging, online chatting and more. While managing the different forms of communication may be hip, Seventeen magazine's Ann Shoket says the trend does not mix with driving. Ann talks with Gayle about a recent AAA/ Seventeen survey that shows an increasing number of teens multitasking and engaging in other distracting behavior while behind the wheel. According to the survey of 1,000 teens, 46 percent text messaged while driving, 51 percent talked on the phone while driving, 58 percent drove with friends in the car and 40 percent have exceeded the speed limit by 10 miles per hour. "It used to be that everybody was worried about driving under the influence," Ann says. "Now, everyone has to worry about driving while distracted. When you combine a cell phone—whether you are talking or texting—with driving, it is a recipe for disaster." Preventing distracted driving deaths starts at home and Ann says that means parents need to reiterate good driving habits. "If parents are giving their teens the responsibility of driving a car, then parents have to give their teens the responsibility of enforcing the rules of the road," she says. Ann shares advice for teen drivers to follow when behind the wheel: Sign a safe driving contract. Wear a seatbelt. Avoid changing the radio. Do not talk on your cell phone. Do not text message. Allow a maximum of one teen passenger in the car. Today's teenagers are masters at high-tech multitasking, juggling cell phones, text messaging, online chatting and more. While managing the different forms of communication may be hip, Seventeen magazine's Ann Shoket says the trend does not mix with driving. Ann talks with Gayle about a recent AAA/ Seventeen survey that shows an increasing number of teens multitasking and engaging in other distracting behavior while behind the wheel. According to the survey of 1,000 teens, 46 percent text messaged while driving, 51 percent talked on the phone while driving, 58 percent drove with friends in the car and 40 percent have exceeded the speed limit by 10 miles per hour. "It used to be that everybody was worried about driving under the influence," Ann says. "Now, everyone has to worry about driving while distracted. When you combine a cell phone—whether you are talking or texting—with driving, it is a recipe for disaster." Preventing distracted driving deaths starts at home and Ann says that means parents need to reiterate good driving habits. "If parents are giving their teens the responsibility of driving a car, then parents have to give their teens the responsibility of enforcing the rules of the road," she says. Ann shares advice for teen drivers to follow when behind the wheel: Sign a safe driving contract. Wear a seatbelt. Avoid changing the radio. Do not talk on your cell phone. Do not text message. Allow a maximum of one teen passenger in the car.
  • Teens missing message on road texting risk By Larry Copeland, USA TODAY Many teens view texting while driving as less risky than drunken driving despite a sustained campaign against texting behind the wheel and research indicating it's as dangerous as drinking and driving, a new survey for State Farm insurance company finds. A much higher percentage of teens ages 14 to 17 strongly agree that drunken driving could cause a fatal crash than texting could, the survey by Harris Interactive found. More teens also believe that drunken driving is likelier than texting to cause a crash and lead to a ticket and arrest. "We're doing everything possible to get the message out to teens that driving while talking or texting on a cellphone is not worth the risk," says Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood , who convenes a second summit on distracted driving Tuesday in Washington, D.C. "Teen drivers are some of the must vulnerable drivers on the road due to inexperience, and adding cellphones to the mix only compounds the dangers," LaHood says. The survey comes after more than two years of a national campaign against distracted driving, especially texting. LaHood has made it a signature issue of his tenure, talk show host Oprah Winfrey regularly urges her millions of viewers not to do it, and 30 states have banned it, including 10 this year. Yet there remains "a real awareness gap around the dangers of distracted driving, and that's what we heard in this survey," says Laurette Stiles, State Farm's vice president of strategic resources. "The risks and the dangers are not well understood by teens. I believe that one of the reasons is that they're not well understood by parents, either." A University of Utah study found that cellphone use caused distractions for motorists as serious as driving with a blood-alcohol content of 0.08%, the legal definition of driving while intoxicated. The State Farm survey highlights a reality of life among many teens: Staying connected is vitally important to them, and maintaining that connection — even when they're driving — overrides safety warnings from driver's education instructors, celebrities and even parents. Just ask Connor Sampson, 18, of Normal, Ill., who rear-ended another car in October while sending a text message to a friend. "It's (staying connected) very important, probably more important than it should be," says Sampson, a senior at University High School in Normal. "My parents were very serious about me not texting and driving. But when you text somebody, if they don't respond in five minutes, you start to wonder what happened, what's wrong." Although teens might not yet fully grasp the risks of road texting, the focus on distracted driving is making many motorists more wary. The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety says 52% of drivers in its new survey feel less safe than they did five years ago — a 17-percentage-point increase since the same time last year; 40% of these drivers cited cellphones/texting/distracted drivers as the biggest reason they feel unsafe.
  • “Achieving Techno-Literacy” by Kevin Kelly
  • Black CAP (SexTech Example) URL: http://www.black-cap.com What: Black CAP is a non profit organization in Toronto, Canada that focuses on HIV/AIDS prevention in Black and Caribbean youth. This group is also reaches out to people living with HIV/ AIDS. The Roots of Risk Program lasted for 24 months. They incorporated community level intervention. A mixture of evidence-informed approaches was used such as: Popular Opinion Leader Mode 50 youth were recruited to act as POLs (30 straight; 20 LGBT) 2 Full Day POL Orientation Session (HIV/STI 101, Effective Outreach, Technology, Privacy, and Support. Held monthly sessions focusing on HIV related issues Social Marketing Design Created two websites (onenightyourchoice.com and getthelowdown.ca) Distributed weekly sexual health and relationship messages Youth- led Programming Highlights/Outcomes/Lessons Learned: Testing program- Implementation of buddy testing program- Peer Supporting Peer through testing process Mode of communication- communication starts with SMS> SNS> Real world interaction Mobiles- Should be equipped with QWERTY boards and function to send multiple SMS simultaneously Retention- free cellular phone was an incentive
  • Project STAY (SexTech Example) URL: www.projectstay.net What: Project STAY (Services to Assist Youth) is led by the Harlem Health Promotion Center and provides medical and psychological services to youth living with HIV/ AIDS as well as high risk youth. Computer animated vignettes are used to reach a young audience through the use of slang and focused subject matter. HHPC used focus groups, and teens provided feedback on the videos. Project STAY plans to continue outreach in high schools and community based organizations as well as increase the off-site screenings to 20 different venues. Highlights/Outcomes/Lessons Learned: Teen feedback is essential for a product that teens will actually respond to. Recommendations from youth for future vignettes included: Show the main character at the clinic and follow the actual process of testing and counseling Address specific questions (ie transmission methods, STI treatment) between two friends and one educates the other by sharing what they learned from a Project STAY counselor who visited their school
  • Healthshack.info (SexTech Example) URL: https:// www.healthshack.info/Default.aspx What: Healthshack.info is a youth controlled, interactive, online Personal Health Information System. This project targets marginalized and homeless youth. This system is web based, youth-friendly, and HIPAA compliant. Site features: Stores health information Provides resources Two portals available- one for youth clients and one for clinicians professional entries. Youth Controlled Confidentiality; Private This site seeks health ambassadors which are youth that were formally marginalized and previously homeless between the ages of 16-22. These youth recruit their peers and add legitimacy to the program, and exemplify positive change. Public health nurse are also involved by assisting youth in creating accounts on the website and acting as health care providers. This groups hopes to continue outreach to youth especially before they exit the system. Another future goal is creating an online community. Highlights/Outcomes/Lessons Learned: Youth ambassadors are a strong resource – they can help bring people in to the program, model positive behavior, and create content that resonates with their peers. Need to have consistent health care services to refer youth to. Need to educate local health care providers about HealthShack.info
  • PASSHEN! Peers Advocating Safety and Sexual Health Education Now! (SexTech Example) URL: http:// www.ci.berkeley.ca.us/ContentDisplay.aspx?id =17724 What: PASSHEN is a peer lead education group that started about 12 years with 10-12 graders concerned about the health of their school and communities. The program is lead by the division of public health in Berkeley, California. The program annually recruits 15 peer educators that are in 10th, 11th, or 12th grade, trains them, and organizes retreats and meetings. These peer educators are responsible for designing curriculums, presentations, and community outreach. This is effective because the peers lead the workshops alone, and they do all of the teaching. Highlights/Outcomes/Lessons Learned: Youth get a lot out of being peer educators (knowledge, presentation/public speaking skills, class credits) Students are sometimes more comfortable asking questions to another teen.
  • Get Yourself Tested (GYT) (Presented at Sex:Tech, partnership between MTV, KFF, CDC, and others) URL: http:// www.itsyoursexlife.com/gyt What: The GYT campaign is a youthful, empowering social movement to reduce the spread of STDs among young people through information, open communication with partners, health care providers, and parents, and testing and treatment as needed. GYT is developed as part of It's Your (Sex) Life, a longstanding public information partnership of MTV and the Kaiser Family Foundation, together with the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA). Highlights/Outcomes/Lessons Learned: According to a KFF news release in April 2010: In 2009, GYT helped fuel an increase in STD testing among of young people under the age of 25 at Planned Parenthood health centers nationwide, including a 36 percent increase in the number of male STD testing patients and an 18 percent increase in the number of female STD testing patients from the previous year in ten nationally representative Planned Parenthood health centers. These increases were particularly noteworthy in communities of color, with a 30 percent increase over 2008 in the number of African-American female STD testing patients and a 20 percent increase in the number of Latina STD testing patients.   
  • Metro Teen AIDS & REALTalkDC (Non-Federal) URL: http:// metroteenaids.org / and http:// www.realtalkdc.org /about/ What: MetroTeen AIDS is a community health organization dedicated to supporting young people in the fight against HIV/AIDS. MetroTeen AIDS’s REALTalkDC campaign reaches youth by providing sexual health information and access to FREE condoms and HIV/STI testing online and through a text message campaign where you can text ‘REALtalk’ to 61827. REALtalk Reps – the group of peer educators that are the secret weapon to combating HIV in DC – also visit neighborhoods that are affected by HIV to spread the word about prevention while decreasing stigma of the virus through the support of young people that are living with HIV. Highlights/Outcomes/Lessons Learned (from website): REALtalkDC is only as good as its promotion. They have large ads on buses, in the subway, at bus shelters, and in local businesses. They have public service announcements on local urban radio stations and have events throughout the city at universities, night clubs, theaters, recreation centers, libraries, schools, churches and at our Freestyle Youth Center. They keep in touch with folks after large events through our social networking sites like Facebook and YouTube as well as sending frequent text blasts.
  • ISIS (Non-federal) URL: http://www.isis-inc.org/index.php What: Internet Sexuality Information Services, Inc., develops technology for promotion of sexual health and healthy relationships, and to prevent disease transmission. Their mission is to provide leadership, innovation, educational resources and research in online sexual health promotion. Many of their projects and partnerships are focused on youth, and they host the annual Sex::Tech conference focused on youth, sexual health, and technolofy. Highlights/Outcomes/Lessons Learned: One Bay Area based project, SexInfo, is a public health text messaging service that was launched in 2006. The service received 4,500 sexual health inquiries in just its first 25 weeks of service, with broken condoms, pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases topping the subject list.

Youth HIV/AIDS Education 2.0: Applying New Media to Extend the Reach of HIV/AIDS Programs Youth HIV/AIDS Education 2.0: Applying New Media to Extend the Reach of HIV/AIDS Programs Presentation Transcript

  • Youth HIV/AIDS Education 2.0: Applying New Media to Extend the Reach of HIV/AIDS Programs Tuesday, September 21, 2010 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Miguel Gomez Director, AIDS.gov
  • What is AIDS.gov
  •  
  • Digital Native: A person born into the digital age (after 1980) with access to networked digital technologies & strong computer skills & knowledge.
  • They can’t help it, they are born that way.
    • “ Youth want their information when they want it, how they want it and in whatever quantities they want it.”
    Adapted from Price Waterhouse quote
  • Obligation to
  • Challenges in Using New Media:
    • What new media is …
    • How are your clients accessing information online …
    • The role of new media in HIV/AIDS prevention and care planning
  • What is New Media?
    • We have reached an important juncture, where the lack of trust in established institutions and figures of authority has motivated people to trust their peers as the best sources of information .”
    • 2009 Trust Barometer
    “ … Informed publics value guidance from credentialed experts over a ‘person like me,’ which lost ground as a credible voice of information for a company.” 2010 Trust Barometer “
  • Pew Internet & American Life Report, “Social Media and Young Adults.” Feb 3, 2010. http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Social-Media-and-Young-Adults/Part-1.aspx?view=all
  • Pew Internet & American Life Report, “Teens and Mobile Phones.” April 20, 2010. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Teens-and-Mobile-Phones.aspx
  • Twitter Pew Internet & American Life Report, “Social Media and Young Adults.” Feb 3, 2010. http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Social-Media-and-Young-Adults/Part-1.aspx?view=all
  • Pew Internet & American Life Report, “Teens and Mobile Phones.” April 20, 2010. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Teens-and-Mobile-Phones.aspx
  • Pew Internet & American Life Report, “Teens and Mobile Phones.” April 20, 2010. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Teens-and-Mobile-Phones.aspx
  • A typical teen sends about 50 texts per day Pew Internet & American Life Report, “Teens and Mobile Phones.” April 20, 2010. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Teens-and-Mobile-Phones.aspx
    • In a typical month
    • 25% of gay men
    • 15% of heterosexual men
    • Say they send a text message at least one a day*
    *http://harrisinteractive.com/news/allnewsbydate.asp?NewsID=1300
  • Pew Internet & American Life Report, “Teens and Mobile Phones.” April 20, 2010. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Teens-and-Mobile-Phones.aspx
  • Washington Post, Front Page Tuesday, August 24, 2010 E-Grounding
  • Pew Internet & American Life Report, “Teens and Mobile Phones.” April 20, 2010. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Teens-and-Mobile-Phones.aspx
  • Pew Internet & American Life Report, “Teens and Mobile Phones.” April 20, 2010. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Teens-and-Mobile-Phones.aspx Photo-taking & –sharing most popular feature after texting
  •  
  •  
  • 200 of Alabama A& M Students in this Mosaic. We are all Facing AIDS Together. 
  • Teens and Sexting Sexting – the creating, sharing and forwarding of sexually suggestive nude or nearly nude images or videos by minor teens via cell phone text messages Pew Internet and American Life Project, 2009. Available at: http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2009/Teens-and-Sexting.aspx Accessed 1/13/2010
  • “… 4% of American teens have sent sexually suggestive images or videos of themselves via cell phone, and 15% have received such images from someone they know, with no gender differences in those percentages.” Sexting Youth and Safety on the Internet: Report of the Online Safety and Technology Group, 2010. Available at: http://www.ntia.doc.gov/reports/2010/OSTWG_Final_Report_070610.pdf . Accessed 9/20/210
  • Some Key Recommendations
    • Keep up with the youth-risk and social-media research, and create a web-based clearinghouse.
    • Coordinate Federal Government educational efforts.
    • Provide targeted online-safety messaging and treatment.
    • Avoid scare tactics and promote the social-norms approach to risk prevention.
    • Promote digital citizenship in pre-K-12 education as a national priority.
    • Respect young people’s expertise and get them involved in risk-prevention education.
  • Texting and Driving 46% of teens text while driving
  • Texting and Driving
    • “ If we listen to technology, and learn to be proficient in its ways, then we’ll be able to harness this most powerful force in the world. If not, we’ll be stuck at the bottom of the class.”
    Gaming New York Times Magazine, September 16, 2010. Available at: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/19/magazine/19FOB-WWLN-Kelly-t.html 9/20/10
    • 14% of 6 th -10 th graders involved in cyber-bullying
    • 20% physical bullying
    • 50% verbal bullying
    Cyber-bullying Washington Post Tuesday, September 21, 2010
  • Black CAP
  • Project Stay Services to Assist Youth
  •  
  • PASSHEN! Peers Advocating Safety and Sexual Health Education Now!
  •  
  •  
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  • it is about planning… New Media Technology Communication Subject Matter Expert
  • “ It is to large degree in our own hands – most of all, in their own hands – to shape the future of the Internet.” - Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives , by John Palfrey and Urs Gasser
  • Stay Connected!
    • www.AIDS.gov
    • Blog.AIDS.gov
    • Twitter.com/aidsgov
    • Facebook.com/aidsgov
    • Myspace.com/aidsgov
    • Flickr.com/aidsgov
    • YouTube.com/aidsgov
    • [email_address]