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Youth and New Media: Presidents Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS
 

Youth and New Media: Presidents Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS

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  • Along the bottom – add -- keep it small 44 th Presidential Advisory Council Meeting: Youth and HIV: 9/9/11: Miguel Gomez, AIDS.gov MSS – since I have such limited time – I want folks to see this quote up front and center -- Thanks
  • Yesterday was National HIV Testing Day and much of what I ’m going to show you today relates to our efforts to connect people with HIV prevention and treatment services
  • HIV service community involvement – evolutionaly development into new media
  • Youth and new and emerging technologies
  • Mobile devices are personal and it doesn’t get more personal than health and with health it doesn’t get more personal than sexual health.
  • Youth and new and emerging technologies
  • Youth and new and emerging technologies
  • Youth and new and emerging technologies – new data
  • Youth and new and emerging technologies
  • MSS -- add here the Follow the NHAS - put in a slide here of the post card that you have made -- thanks

Youth and New Media: Presidents Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS Youth and New Media: Presidents Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS Presentation Transcript

    • Social network sites have changed our lives because they made this rapid shift in public life visible. Instead of trying to stop them or regulate use, we should learn from what teens are experiencing. They are learning to navigate networked publics; it is in our interest to help them.
    • - modified from danah boyd
    44 th Presidential Advisory Council Meeting: Youth and HIV MIGUEL GOMEZ, AIDS.gov
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  • Students who report spending “a lot” or “some” time using social media. Find informaton about friends 56% Share opinions 55% Find out what is happening in the world 50% Find out what is happening in school 47% Share personal information with friends 46% As social media use has grown in the United States so has students ’ appreciation for the First Amendment* Knight Foundation 2011 Report:  Future of the First Amendment
  • Demographics of teen internet users % of teens who use the internet The Pew Research Center’ s Internet & American Life Project 2009 Parent-Teen Cell Phone Survey conducted from June 26 to September 24, 2009 n=800 teens ages 12-17 (including 245 cell phone interviews) Total teens 93 Boys 91 Girls 94 Race/ethnicity White, Non-hispanic 94 Black, Non-Hispanic 87 Hispanic 95 Age 12-13 88 14-17 95 Household income Less than $30,000.yr 88 $30,000-$49,000 89 $50,000-$74,999 96 $75,000+ 97
  • 17% of teen look online for health topics that are hard to talk about, like drug use, sexual health, or depression 31% of teens look online for health, dieting, or physical fitness info - When young people don’t feel like they’re getting what they need from an adult they typically turn to their devices.
  • Teen gadget ownership % of all teens ages 12-17 who own each of the following devices (as of September 2009) The Pew Research Center ’s Internet & American Life Project 2009 Parent-Teen Cell Phone Survey conducted from June 26 to September 24, 2009 n=800 teens ages 12-17 (including 245 cell phone interviews)
  • Percent of teens who own a cell phone by age The Pew Research Center ’s Internet & American Life Project 2009 Parent-Teen Cell Phone Survey conducted from June 26 to September 24, 2009 n=800 teens ages 12-17 (including 245 cell phone interviews)
  • Percent of teen device owners who use that device to go online (ages 12-17) The Pew Research Center’ s Internet & American Life Project 2009 Parent-Teen Cell Phone Survey conducted from June 26 to September 24, 2009 n=800 teens ages 12-17 (including 245 cell phone interviews)
  • Typical number of texts per day The mean and medium send by teens The Pew Research Center’ s Internet & American Life Project 2009 Parent-Teen Cell Phone Survey conducted from June 26 to September 24, 2009 n=800 teens ages 12-17 (including 245 cell phone interviews)
  • We have reached an important juncture, where the lack of trust in established institutions and figures of authority has motivated people to trust their peers as the best sources of information. ” 2009 Trust Barometer “ … Informed publics value guidance from credentialed experts over a ‘person like me,’ which lost ground as a credible voice of information for a company.” 2010 Trust Barometer “
  • They can ’t help it, they are born that way. Digital Native: A person born into the digital age (after 1980) who has access to networked digital technologies and strong computer skills and knowledge.
  • “ It is to a large degree in our own hands – most of all, in their own hands – to shape the future of the Internet.” - Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives , by John Palfrey and Urs Gasser
  • blog.AIDS.gov twitter.com/AIDSgov facebook.com/AIDSgov myspace.com/AIDSgov flickr.com/AIDSgov youtube.com/AIDSgov foursquare.com/AIDSgov http://m.AIDS.gov http://locator.AIDS.gov Stay Connected
  • READ THE STRATEGY @ FOLLOW THE CONVERSATION WITH THE HASHTAG READ, COMMENT, SUBSCRIBE SCAN AND LEARN MORE #NHAS blog.AIDS.gov