The "your name here" Podcast: what works and why.
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Erik Ireland, Digital Content Manager, San Francisco AIDS Foundation (SFAF), discussed lessons of using podcasts to further SFAF’s mission.

Erik Ireland, Digital Content Manager, San Francisco AIDS Foundation (SFAF), discussed lessons of using podcasts to further SFAF’s mission.

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  • Other issues include: Accurate recall, Lack of agreement between partners about sexual encounter dates, times, exposure, etc.
  • Bridge Populations: example, bisexual men have long been hypothesized as serving as a bridge population between gay men and heterosexual women
  • Mathematical and Theoretical Models of Concurrency and the Spread of HIV/STIs There is a great deal of literature illustrating the mathematical and theoretical reasons that sexual partner concurrency creates a unique set of circumstances to speed the transmission of STIs and HIV within a population. Martina Morris and Mirjam Kretzschmar demonstrated the importance of partner dynamics in determining the rate and scope of HIV transmission within a population in articles that have become the foundation of concurrency research (Morris, 1997; Kretzschmar, 1996; Morris, 2000; Morris, 1995) . The authors compare multiple scenarios of sexual partnership, including sequential monogamy and multiple partner concurrency and conclude that concurrent partnerships exponentially increase the number of infected individuals and the growth rate of the epidemic during its initial phase.
  • SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA South Africa: 40% men in rural area (Colvin, 1998) 16% of adults, Khayelitsha township outside Cape Town (Mah 2008) Botwana: 23% of adults (Carter, 2007) Zambia: 1998: 13% rural men, 8% urban men 2003: 8% rural men, 6% urban men prevalence reducing (Sandoy 2008) Malawi: 63% of adults, Likoma Island (Helleringer 2009) Wide range in measured prevalences are likely to be explained by not only differing social/cultural norms between countries, but also from differing socioeconomic circumstances or background characteristics in study populations, or different definitions for concurrency used by the researchers. UNITED STATES General: 11% men, 12% women (Adimora 2002b, 2007) Blacks: 51% men, 31% women (Adimora 2004) High Risk: 67% male partner of women in high risk areas, SF (Chen 2009) 49% women in high risk areas, Houston (Richards 2008) High risk populations are people connnected with areas of high HIV prevalence/transmission as identified in the National HIV Behavior Surveillance Programme SLOVENIA (Klavs, 2009) ADOLESCENTS 13% of 16-26yo, Cape metropolitan Area (Mah, 2008b) 38% of young men, 2% of young women in Kwa-Zulu Natal (Harrison 2008) 20% of Latino adolescents, US (Doherty 2007) MSM(W) Male partners: 40%, San Francisco (Bernstein 2008) Female partners: Most research on concurrency among MSM focusses on bisexual concurrent relationships among men who have sexual relationships with members of both sexes. Research on MSM has recently emerged in three Southern African countries: Malawi, Namibia, and Botswana (Baral et al. 2009) . MSM in all three countries report high levels of bisexual concurrency, meaning that men had concurrent relationships with both men and women (25.5% in Malawi, 10.3% in Namibia and 12.3% in Botswana). Moreover, the majority (or near-majority in the case of Botswana) of MSM reported having both male and female sexual partners in the last 6 months. In all three countries, MSM reported more male than female sexual partners transactional sex, and anal intercourse for gifts or money (Baral et al. 2009) . Similarly, in Senegal, the vast majority of MSM (82%) reported heterosexual contacts, and 55.7% reported having a regular female partner (Ndiaye HD et al. 2009). In Tamil Nadu, a southern state in India, Solomon et al. (2009) found that 85% of MSM reported having also had sex with a women, 60% defined themselves as bisexual and a third (34%) were married. Married MSM were more likely to be infected with HIV or other STIs than those who were unmarried, highlighting the increased risk of HIV transmission to married women in India. In Slovenia, while very few men reported having had sex with men (0.6%), the majority of these men were married or cohabiting with a woman. MSM also have the highest HIV prevalence of any group in Slovenia (although it remains below 5%), indicating a possibility, however remote, for a generalized epidemic. (Klavs et al. 2009) .
  • GENDER There is a strong association between gender and concurrent partnerships. In all contexts studied, men are much more likely to engage in concurrent partnerships than women In Zambia for example, men are 6-17 times more likely to report multiple concurrent partners than women (Sandoy et al, 2008) Young men were more than 7 times as likely as young women to participate in concurrent relationships in the Cape Metropolitan Area of South Africa (Mah 2008b) . In addition, motivations for concurrency differ vastly among men and women : Men often point to normative practices in the community (such as polygamy, peripartum abstinence) to argue that multiple partnerships are normal and expected. They also suggest that different partnerships fulfill different needs such as companionship or sex Women often take on additional partners to fulfill financial or survival needs or desires. Some women report having a non-primary partner to acquire status in the community. Some also report that different partners fulfill different personal or sexual needs.
  • GENDER There is a strong association between gender and concurrent partnerships. In all contexts studied, men are much more likely to engage in concurrent partnerships than women In Zambia for example, men are 6-17 times more likely to report multiple concurrent partners than women (Sandoy et al, 2008) Young men were more than 7 times as likely as young women to participate in concurrent relationships in the Cape Metropolitan Area of South Africa (Mah 2008b) . In addition, motivations for concurrency differ vastly among men and women : Men often point to normative practices in the community (such as polygamy, peripartum abstinence) to argue that multiple partnerships are normal and expected. They also suggest that different partnerships fulfill different needs such as companionship or sex Women often take on additional partners to fulfill financial or survival needs or desires. Some women report having a non-primary partner to acquire status in the community. Some also report that different partners fulfill different personal or sexual needs.

The "your name here" Podcast: what works and why. The "your name here" Podcast: what works and why. Presentation Transcript

  • The “your-name-here” Podcast: what works and why. Erik Ireland Digital Conent Manager San Francisco AIDS Foundation 2009 National HIV Prevention Conference August 23-26, 2008 Atlanta, Georgia
  • Has your anyone ever told you… 8/25/2009 The “your-name-here” Podcast: what works and why “ We really need to start using new media/web 2.0/social networking/etc?” Did you ask why?
  • What is a podcast? And what isn’t?
    • Audio or video (or both) presentation
    • Regular schedule/format
    • RSS Feed/Blog
    • iTunes syndication
    • Social media integration
    Key Elements 8/25/2009 The “your-name-here” Podcast: what works and why
  • This American Life or Charlie Rose ?
    • AIDS/LifeCycle Podcast
    • vs.
    • SFAF.org Podcast
    Creating unique content for unique audiences 8/25/2009 The “your-name-here” Podcast: what works and why
    • Content – what is the story?
    • Format – how is it being told?
    • Voice – who is telling the story to whom?
    • Look / Feel – what is the tone/feeling of the story?
  • Tune In & Turn On
    • Facebook/MySpace
    • Twitter
    • Email lists
    Reaching audiences with word-of-finger sharing 8/25/2009 The “your-name-here” Podcast: what works and why
  • “ Print-egration” - the art of cross-promotion
    • Where does your audience go?
    • What do they read?
    • What do they watch & listen to?
    • How can you be there too?
      • Get into your organization’s printed materials/newsletters
      • Interview people who have new constituencies that overlap yours
      • Make yourself available for interviews or have others in your organization mention your podcast in their talks
    8/25/2009 The “your-name-here” Podcast: what works and why Cross-promoting with publications, events & media
  • Mission Control
    • The San Francisco AIDS Foundation provides leadership to prevent new HIV infections. Linking community experience with science, the Foundation develops ground-breaking prevention programs and bold policy initiatives to promote health and create sustainable progress against HIV. Established in 1982, the Foundation refuses to accept that HIV transmission is inevitable.
    8/25/2009 The “your-name-here” Podcast: what works and why Your organization’s mission and your podcast
  • Hey! What if…?
    • Your podcast could be a flexible problem solver for your organization.
    • Your podcast could fill communications gaps with lasting, valuable content.
    • Using blogs and/or Twitter, your podcast could create a conversation with your audience.
    8/25/2009 The “your-name-here” Podcast: what works and why Still think you don’t need a podcast?
  • Keep It Simple
    • Use an audio/video formula and stick to it.
    • Introduction
    • Content
    • Close with ‘call to action’ if appropriate
    • Smaller files/shorter podcasts are usually better.
    • Don’t be afraid to be yourself but let the content be the star and always have a focused topic/message.
    • Where else can you use your podcast?
    • Web site homepage
    • Article sidebars
    • Donation appeal
    • Print newsletters/brochures
    • How else can your podcast promote or advance your programs/services?
    8/25/2009 The “your-name-here” Podcast: what works and why What I learned from 4 years of podcast production
  • Want to know more?
    • 12:00 to 1:30 immediately following this panel
    8/25/2009 The “your-name-here” Podcast: what works and why Come to the lab!