Writing Conference Proposals
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Writing Conference Proposals

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    Writing Conference Proposals Writing Conference Proposals Presentation Transcript

      • Conference Proposal Writing and Presentation Skills
    • Adapted for Webinar, April 23, 2010, from the original version (1902) created by eric dwyer http:// www.ericsdwyer.info/ tesol2010prez. ppt (4.5 MB download)
    • Valerie S. Jakar David Yellin Academic College of Education, Jerusalem, Conference Proposal Writing and Submission Skills
    • The Process
      • Read the directions:
        • http ://www.tesol.org
        • Click on “Convention”
        • Then click on “Call for Participation 2011.”
        • Follow the “Call for Participation” form.
      • Designate the appropriate Interest Section (IS) and/or content area.
      • Submit your proposal by the deadline.
    • The Process, continued. Proposals are distributed to the adjudicators who submit their assessments to there is leaders. The Conference Chair and Organizing Committee allocate sessions to topic areas taking into account interest, number of proposals submitted, number of members of the IS, and ….. quality.
    • Rubric for TESOL
      • Scored 0-5 for each of the following:
        • Does the proposal title clearly describe the session?
        • Is the proposed topic timely and/or appropriate?
        • Is the session based on best/recommended practice within the EF/SL field?
        • Is the proposal abstract clearly written?
        • Will this session positively contribute to the convention and the EF/SL field?
      • Total potential score: 0-30 see final frames for Rubrics.
    • The Final Steps
      • After discussing borderline proposals and other critical factors regarding scheduling,
      • the Chair notifies presenters regarding acceptances and rejections.
      • Presenters - they were accepted! - finalize preparations for their presentations.
      • Presenters deliver their presentations at the Annual Convention.
    • Reviewing
      • Three peer reviewers will review all proposal submissions* and will have the opportunity to provide comments to the submitting author, but the reviewers’ identities will remain confidential.
      • All proposal reviewers will use evaluation criteria and a scoring rubric - see below. 
      • Total possible score is based on a scale of 30 points.
      • *’blind’ review (without seeing the proposers’ name(s).
    • So you (still) want to submit a proposal, eh? Where do you start? Why do you want to submit a proposal? Isn’t it hard to get one accepted? How do you get started? What’s the first thing to do? Check the procedures and requirements then start to think, and plan, and think, and discuss, and think - and write!
    • What kinds of topics are encouraged?
      • Those focusing on the conference theme
        • See themes: Worlds of TESOL, Building communities…
        • This coming year =
        • Examining the “E” in TESOL
      • Related to the future of the TESOL profession & professional development
      • From all settings, but note the audience for whom you will be writing your proposal
      • Presentations that
        • use interactive formats
        • engage the audience
        • focus on classroom practice
      What kinds of topics are encouraged?
      • Those focusing on the conference theme
        • See themes: Re-Imagining TESOL,
        • Worlds of TESOL, Building communities of creativity, practice, and inquiry.
        • This coming year = >
        • Examining the “E” in TESOL
      • Those related to the future of the TESOL profession & professional development
      • Appropriate – and stimulating - topics for a specific audience with whom you are familiar.
      • Presentations that
        • use interactive formats
        • engage the audience
        • focus on classroom practice
        • are given by more than one presenter.
    • What the Review Team says…..
      • Good proposals
        • identify the anticipated outcomes
        • relate theory to practice
        • address issues of current, local and global relevance
    • What the Review Team says…..
      • Good proposals
        • are anchored in a historical context
        • are not narrowly focused
        • draw on research, theory and practice from one or more disciplines
        • are well written and free of typos/grammar mistakes
        • have significance for an intended audience
        • exhibit high standards or research or practice
    • Type of Proposal Choose the correct type of proposal (typical time) Type of Proposal Choose the correct type of proposal (typical time) Presentation Length Colloquium 1 hour 45 minutes Discussion Group 45 minutes Hot Topic 20 minutes Poster Session 1 hour 15 minutes Practice-oriented Presentation 45 minutes Research-oriented Presentation 45 minutes Teaching Tip 20 minutes Video and Digital Media Theater 45 minutes Workshop 1 hour 45 minutes Presentation Length Colloquium 1 hour 45 minutes Discussion Group 45 minutes Hot Topic 20 minutes Poster Session 1 hour 15 minutes Practice-oriented Presentation 45 minutes Research-oriented Presentation 45 minutes Teaching Tip 20 minutes Video and Digital Media Theater 45 minutes Workshop 1 hour 45 minutes
    • Follow the Proposal Guidelines!
      • The three components of the submitted proposal are:
        • Abstract
        • Title
        • Summary
        • We’ll focus on the Summary first.
    • Checklist for Summaries A summary should
      • meet the technical requirements (word count, verb tense, no personal names.)
      • demonstrate its importance to the field, based on theory and/or research.
      • clearly define who the intended audience is
        • In other words, it is sent to the correct Interest Section (IS)
      • describe what the presenters intend to do
      • Describe how the audience will benefit
    • Summaries
      • Summary ( 300 words max)
        • This document is crucial because it’s the sole document that the review teams see.
      • Summaries should
        • have a clearly stated rationale
        • contain evidence of current practice and/or research
          • Note: Be sure to note whether the presentation is research related or not .
        • include supporting details and examples
        • be carefully edited and proofread
        • demonstrate that presenter has chosen the correct type of presentation.
      Type of Proposal Choose the correct type of proposal (typical time) Type of Proposal Choose the correct type of proposal (typical time) Presentation Length Colloquium 1 hour 45 minutes Discussion Group 45 minutes Hot Topic 20 minutes Poster Session 1 hour 15 minutes Practice-oriented Presentation 45 minutes Research-oriented Presentation 45 minutes Teaching Tip 20 minutes Video and Digital Media Theater 45 minutes Workshop 1 hour 45 minutes Presentation Length Colloquium 1 hour 45 minutes Discussion Group 45 minutes Hot Topic 20 minutes Poster Session 1 hour 15 minutes Practice-oriented Presentation 45 minutes Research-oriented Presentation 45 minutes Teaching Tip 20 minutes Video and Digital Media Theater 45 minutes Workshop 1 hour 45 minutes
    • Improving Your Description
      • Get feedback from others who have had their proposals accepted.
      • Volunteer to read proposals for your Interest Section (IS)
      • Get involved in a Interest Section (IS)
        • Network and learn what topics the interest section would like to see on the convention program
    • Factors Affecting Selection
      • Well-written proposal summaries have a better chance of being accepted than poorly written ones
      • Proposals by duos, groups, and teams of colleagues may take priority over those of showcasing only one person.
    • Titles
      • Good titles attract people to your session
        • We’ll compare and contrast some titles
      • Bear in mind the following :
      • Title (10 words max!)
        • make sure it matches your abstract
        • It should accurately reflect the content of your presentation
        • - try to make it eye catching & interesting
        • BUT avoid gimmicky titles
        • Remember! Each part of hyphenated or slashed words counts as one word
      • What would be a good title for the sample abstract?
    • Titles
      • Rate the following titles:
        • Good?
        • Needs improvement?
      • Rationale?
    • Sample Titles
      • Teaching grammar
      • Silenced voices speak out
      • Grandpa and grammar
      • Daring to lead your students to grammar
      • Grammar: The right way to teach it
      • Activating the passive voice
      • 15 sure-fire warm-ups
      • Can grammar classes promote communication and interaction?
      • Surviving and thriving in new cultures
      • Tactile grammar for all ages
      Checklist Make sure it matches your abstract. It should accurately reflect the content of your presentation. make it eye catching and interesting. Avoid gimmicky titles. Each part of hyphenated or slashed words counts as one word
    • Abstracts
      • Write in 3rd person present or future tense
        • “ The presenters will describe…….”
      • Ensure that the email address you use when you submit your proposal will be valid from June 1, 2010 to March 17, 2011
      • Be sure you have added [email_address] to your safe list or unblock it from your firewall. For information on how to add or unblock an email address, please contact your internet service provider’s technical support department.
    • Abstract
      • Good example or bad example?
      Online teaching issues include unreliable student participation and high dropout. The presenters will review these and other issues for online instructors, discussing tips and online tools available for producing effective courses that keep interest high and participation steady.
    • Abstract
      • One or two general sentence(s) relating your topic to importance in the field, theory and/or research?
      Online teaching issues include unreliable student participation and high dropout. The presenters will review these and other issues for online instructors, discussing tips and online tools available for producing effective courses that keep interest high and participation steady.
    • Abstract
      • One or two general sentence(s) relating your topic to importance in the field, theory and/or research?
      • YES
      Online teaching issues include unreliable student participation and high dropout. The presenters will review these and other issues for online instructors, discussing tips and online tools available for producing effective courses that keep interest high and participation steady.
      • One/two sentence(s) describing what you’re going to do?
      Abstract Online teaching issues include unreliable student participation and high dropout. The presenters will review these and other issues for online instructors, discussing tips and online tools available for producing effective courses that keep interest high and participation steady.
    • Abstract
      • One/two sentence(s) describing what you’re going to do?
      • YES
      Online teaching issues include unreliable student participation and high dropout. The presenters will review these and other issues for online instructors, discussing tips and online tools available for producing effective courses that keep interest high and participation steady.
      • Last item stating what participants will get out of the session?
      Abstract Online teaching issues include unreliable student participation and high dropout. The presenters will review these and other issues for online instructors, discussing tips and online tools available for producing effective courses that keep interest high and participation steady.
    • Abstract
      • Last item stating what participants will get out of the session?
      • YES
      Online teaching issues include unreliable student participation and high dropout. The presenters will review these and other issues to online instructors, discussing tips and online tools available for producing effective courses that keep interest high and participation steady.
    • Abstract
      • Length?
      Online teaching issues include unreliable student participation and high dropout. The presenters will review these and other issues to online instructors, discussing tips and online tools available for producing effective courses that keep interest high and participation steady.
    • Abstract
      • Length? 39 words!
      Online teaching issues include unreliable student participation and high dropout. The presenters will review these and other issues to online instructors, discussing tips and online tools available for producing effective courses that keep interest high and participation steady.
    • Abstract
      • Acronyms? Citations?
      Online teaching issues include unreliable student participation and high dropout. The presenters will review these and other issues to online instructors, discussing tips and online tools available for producing effective courses that keep interest high and participation steady.
    • Abstract
      • Acronyms? Citations?
      • None here!
      Online teaching issues include unreliable student participation and high dropout. The presenters will review these and other issues to online instructors, discussing tips and online tools available for producing effective courses that keep interest high and participation steady.
    • Abstract
      • Good example or bad example?
      Online teaching issues include unreliable student participation and high dropout. The presenters will review these and other issues to online instructors, discussing tips and online tools available for producing effective courses that keep interest high and participation steady.
    • Abstract
      • Good example!
      Online teaching issues include unreliable student participation and high dropout. The presenters will review these and other issues to online instructors, discussing tips and online tools available for producing effective courses that keep interest high and participation steady.
    • Same Content
      • Good example or bad example?
      We are going to review lots of problems (Algren, Carter, Coombe, Dwyer, Eggington, Jakar, Mahboob, Panferov, Tinker-Sachs, and Witt, 2009, p. 19) with online teaching and other areas of concern to instructors who teach them, and then you will get tips and online tools available for producing things that keep student interest high and participation steady in your class.
    • Same Abstract
      • One or two general sentence(s) relating your topic to importance in the field, theory and/or research?
      We are going to review lots of problems (Algren, Carter, Coombe, Dwyer, Eggington, Jakar, Mahboob, Panferov, Tinker-Sachs, and Witt, 2009, p. 19) with online teaching and other areas of concern to instructors who teach them, and then you will get tips and online tools available for producing things that keep student interest high and participation steady in your class.
    • Same Abstract
      • One or two general sentence(s) relating your topic to importance in the field, theory and/or research?
        • SORTA, BUT WHICH PROBLEMS AND CONCERNS?
        • UNRELIABLE STUDENT PARTICIPATION?
        • HIGH DROP-OUT RATES?
      We are going to review lots of problems (Algren, Carter, Coombe, Dwyer, Eggington, Jakar, Mahboob, Panferov, Tinker-Sachs, and Witt, 2009, p. 19) with online teaching and other areas of concern to instructors who teach them, and then you will get tips and online tools available for producing things that keep student interest high and participation steady in your class.
    • Same Abstract
      • One/two sentence(s) describing what you’re going to do?
      We are going to review lots of problems (Algren, Carter, Coombe, Dwyer, Eggington, Jakar, Mahboob, Panferov, Tinker-Sachs, and Witt, 2009, p. 19) with online teaching and other areas of concern to instructors who teach them, and then you will get tips and online tools available for producing things that keep student interest high and participation steady in your class.
    • Same Abstract
      • One/two sentence(s) describing what you’re going to do?
      • SORTA: top-down review; no discussion; no interaction;
      • no exchange of ideas?
      We are going to review lots of problems (Algren, Carter, Coombe, Dwyer, Eggington, Jakar, Mahboob, Panferov, Tinker-Sachs, and Witt, 2009, p. 19) with online teaching and other areas of concern to instructors who teach them, and then you will get tips and online tools available for producing things that keep student interest high and participation steady in your class.
    • Same Abstract
      • Last item stating what participants will get out of the session?
      We are going to review lots of problems (Algren, Carter, Coombe, Dwyer, Eggington, Jakar, Mahboob, Panferov, Tinker-Sachs, and Witt, 2009, p. 19) with online teaching and other areas of concern to instructors who teach them, and then you will get tips and online tools available for producing things that keep student interest high and participation steady in your class.
    • Same Abstract
      • Last item stating what participants will get out of the session?
      • NOT BAD
      We are going to review lots of problems (Algren, Carter, Coombe, Dwyer, Eggington, Jakar, Mahboob, Panferov, Tinker-Sachs, and Witt, 2009, p. 19) with online teaching and other areas of concern to instructors who teach them, and then you will get tips and online tools available for producing things that keep student interest high and participation steady in your class.
    • Same Abstract
      • Length?
      We are going to review lots of problems (Algren, Carter, Coombe, Dwyer, Eggington, Jakar, Mahboob, Panferov, Tinker-Sachs, and Witt, 2009, p. 19) with online teaching and other areas of concern to instructors who teach them, and then you will get tips and online tools available for producing things that keep student interest high and participation steady in your class.
    • Same Abstract
      • Length? 59 words
      We are going to review lots of problems (Algren, Carter, Coombe, Dwyer, Eggington, Jakar, Mahboob, Panferov, Tinker-Sachs, and Witt, 2009, p. 19) with online teaching and other areas of concern to instructors who teach them, and then you will get tips and online tools available for producing things that keep student interest high and participation steady in your class.
    • Same Abstract
      • Length? 59 words
      • WAY
      We are going to review lots of problems (Algren, Carter, Coombe, Dwyer, Eggington, Jakar, Mahboob, Panferov, Tinker-Sachs, and Witt, 2009, p. 19) with online teaching and other areas of concern to instructors who teach them, and then you will get tips and online tools available for producing things that keep student interest high and participation steady in your class.
    • Same Abstract
      • Length? 59 words
      • WAY, WAY
      We are going to review lots of problems (Algren, Carter, Coombe, Dwyer, Eggington, Jakar, Mahboob, Panferov, Tinker-Sachs, and Witt, 2009, p. 19) with online teaching and other areas of concern to instructors who teach them, and then you will get tips and online tools available for producing things that keep student interest high and participation steady in your class.
    • Same Abstract
      • Length? 59 words. OOPS!
      • WAY, WAY, WAY TOO LONG!
      • How can we crop it?
      We are going to review lots of problems (Algren, Carter, Coombe, Dwyer, Eggington, Jakar, Mahboob, Panferov, Tinker-Sachs, and Witt, 2009, p. 19) with online teaching and other areas of concern to instructors who teach them, and then you will get tips and online tools available for producing things that keep student interest high and participation steady in your class.
    • Same Abstract
      • Citations? Acronyms?
      We are going to review lots of problems (Algren, Yeh, Carter, Coombe, Dwyer, Eggington, Jakar, Mahboob, Panferov, Tinker-Sachs, and Witt, 2009, p. 19) with online teaching and other areas of concern to instructors who teach them, and then you will get tips and online tools available for producing things that keep student interest high and participation steady in your class.
    • Same Abstract
      • Citations? OOPS!
      We are going to review lots of problems ( Algren, Yeh, Carter, Coombe, Dwyer, Eggington, Jakar, Mahboob, Panferov, Tinker-Sachs, and Witt, 2009, p. 19 ) with online teaching and other areas of concern to instructors who teach them, and then you will get tips and online tools available for producing things that keep student interest high and participation steady in your class.
    • Same Abstract
      • Citations? Oh Yeh!!
        • Besides, why on Earth would we cite them?
      We are going to review lots of problems ( Algren, Yeh, Carter, Coombe, Dwyer, Eggington, Jakar, Mahboob, Panferov, Tinker-Sachs, and Witt, 2009, p. 19 ) with online teaching and other areas of concern to instructors who teach them, and then you will get tips and online tools available for producing things that keep student interest high and participation steady in your class.
    • Now look at this sample abstract. Good abstract or bad abstract? Why do you say so? Reasons to support your answer? Volunteers? According to testing literature, multiple-choice questions (MCQs) are the most difficult to develop. Although MCQs are tremendously popular, teachers lack experience in writing valid and reliable items. This workshop provides guidelines and experience in writing, critiquing and analyzing multiple-choice items.
    • Compare it with A.
      • A.
      • Good MCQs are the most difficult formats to develop (Coombe et al, 2011) and everyone needs to learn about making good ones. Although they are still the most popular sort of item, all teachers lack training. You will have hands-on experience in writing, critiquing and analyzing MCQs and getting handouts to take home.
      • B.
      • According to testing literature, multiple-choice questions (MCQs) are the most difficult to develop. Although MCQs are tremendously popular, teachers lack experience in writing valid and reliable items. This workshop provides guidelines and experience in writing, critiquing and analyzing multiple-choice items.
    • According to testing literature, multiple-choice questions (MCQs) are the most difficult to develop. Although MCQs are tremendously popular, teachers lack experience in writing valid and reliable items. This workshop provides guidelines and experience in writing, critiquing and analyzing multiple-choice items.
    • Factors Affecting Selection
      • An important factor for the proposals team is balance.
        • Too many proposals on the same topic cannot all be accepted
      • Proposals targeting certain demographics have a good chance of being selected.
        • NB: There is a lack of good presentation content at the primary and secondary school level
    • Factors Disqualifying a Proposal
      • It promotes commercial interests.
      • It doesn’t conform to the proposal guidelines.
      • It contains clear reference to names of presenters.
      • It is not received before the deadline. The same proposal is submitted to more than one Interest Section (IS) or more than once.
      • The same proposal is submitted every year under different titles.
      • The proposal was faxed or mailed.
      • Being a no-show at a prior conference.
        • All proposals: Tuesday, June 1
        • Supporting video materials: Monday, August 2
        • 5:00 pm – Washington, DC time
    • Follow the Proposal Guidelines!
      • Most accepted proposals have one important component in common: they conform to the guidelines
      • Many rejected proposals have one important component in common: they don’t conform to the guidelines.
    • Criterion Excellent 5 Good 4 Satisfactory 3 Fair 2 Poor 1 4. Focus and organization of content (based on proposal type) The proposal is well-focused. It previews the topic, presents the materials in an interesting way, and shows how it will be included. The proposal is focused and explains how the presenter will introduce and present the material in a comprehensible way. The organization may be understandable to the audience, but the proposal could be more focused and better organized. The topic’s focus is too narrow or too general. The proposal shows some organization, but it may not provide sufficient guidance for the audience. The topic is not focused or there is little or no organization to the proposal. 5. Clarity of proposal and participant outcomes The proposal abstract is well written and provides an explicit statement of participant outcomes and how they will be achieved. The proposal abstract is clearly written and provides a general statement of participant outcomes and how these will be achieved. The proposal abstract is adequately written and includes a statement of participant outcomes, but it needs more detail. The abstract gives some ideas about outcomes but needs to specify how they will be reached during the presentation. The proposal abstract needs work on sentence structure. It also fails to give outcomes. 6. Theory, practice, and/or research contribution to the convention and/or to the Field or IS The abstract refers to the theory, practice, and/or research on which the presentation is based and clearly shows how it is connected to the presentation in a relevant and useful way. The abstract refers to the theory, practice, and/or research on which the presentation is based in an understandable way and relates it to the presentation. The abstract refers to theory, practice, and/or research on which the presentation is based and relates it to the presentation to some extent. The abstract mentions that some theory, practice, and/or research was used, but the abstract is not specific or does not relate it to the presentation. The abstract does not mention theory, practice, or research.
    • Criterion Excellent 5 Good 4 Satisfactory 3 Fair 2 Poor 1 1. Proposal title The title gains the reader’s interest; describes the session. The title clearly describes the session. The title generally describes what the session will be about The title has some indication of the session’s content. The title gives little information about the session’s content. 2. Purpose and session type The proposal matches the session type. The objective is clear (stated or implied); there are specifics that make the reader want to learn more. The proposal is appropriate for the session type. The objective is clear (stated or implied), and it is clear how the presenter will attain it. The proposal is generally appropriate for the session type. The objective is stated or implied, but how it will be achieved is not explained. The proposal may be appropriate for the session type. The objective is too general and how it will be achieves is not explained. The proposal is inappropriate for the session type, or the objective is not stated, implied, or clear. 3. Currency, importance, and appropriateness of topic to the field and interest section (IS) The topic is current, immediately relevant, or important to the field and the IS. I would definitely attend or recommend this session. The topic is current and appropriate to the field and/or the IS. I would probably attend this session. The topic may not be current but focuses on issues appropriate to the field and the IS. I may attend this session. The topic is somewhat related to issues in the field and the IS. I would probably not attend this session. The topic is not current or not appropriate to the field or IS. I would not attend this session.
    • So YOUR PROPOSAL WAS ACCEPTED! Congratulations! Now the work really begins!
      • Let’s talk about giving presentations!
      • See you in the Fall!
    • Conference Proposal Writing and Submission Skills