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Sample cronbach analysis using kara

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  • 1. Sample Cronbach Analysis using Kara.sav Aiden Yeh Wenzao Ursuline University
  • 2. Follow the highlighted texts
  • 3. Living Standard Category (Construct)
  • 4. Click ‘Statistics’, choose ‘item, scale, scale if deleted, and correlations • Click continue, • then click ‘ok’ to produce output
  • 5. • Pretty low Cronbach alpha of . 571 for this sample size of 110 (N=110)
  • 6. Look at the "Cronbach's Alpha if Item Deleted" • Corrected item-total correlation for Japan111 is very, very low at .081, which means you may remove this item • Nonetheless, your reliability factor for this scale is still very poor
  • 7. • A low value of alpha could be due to a low number of questions, poor interrelatedness between items or heterogeneous constructs. • For example if a low alpha is due to poor correlation between items then some should be revised or discarded. • items with low correlations (approaching zero) are deleted.
  • 8. • A reliability of .5 means that about half of the variance of the observed score is attributable to truth and half is attributable to error. • Low Cronbach's alpha also means that a group of people did not respond to that set of items consistently
  • 9. • In a case where the [internal consistency] reliability is somewhat low, you may still want to sum the scores (count/frequency)
  • 10. • In a case where the [internal consistency] reliability is somewhat low, you may still want to sum the scores (count/frequency)