Ebonics 2013
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Ebonics 2013 Ebonics 2013 Presentation Transcript

  • EbonicsCross-Cultural CommunicationsWenzao Ursuline College ofLanguageshttp://www.rethinkingschools.org/img/publication/covers/ebonics_250.jpg
  • Ebonics Emerges• African-American Vernacular English(AAVE) — sometimes known as BlackEnglish or Ebonics — is used by manyAfrican Americans, particularly those fromworking-class or inner-city areas.• Black English clearly differs from othervarieties of English in its vocabulary,grammar and pronunciation, but simplyattaching it to one population groupoversimplifies a complex situation.http://www.pbs.org/speak/words/sezwho/socialsetting/
  • Ebonics: The True Language ofBlack Folks• formally defined in 1975 when Williamspublished an edited volume, Ebonics: The TrueLanguage of Black Folks. In it, he classifiedEbonics as the• …linguistic and paralinguistic features which ona concentric continuum represent thecommunicative competence of the West African,Caribbean, and United States slave descendantof African origin. (Williams, 1975)http://www.pbs.org/speak/seatosea/americanvarieties/AAVE/ebonics/
  • Discrimination• But even after slavery was abolished in the U.S.,a recurrent combination of racial segregation andinferior educational opportunities prevented manyAfrican Americans from adopting speech patternsassociated with Americans of European ancestry.• As a result, generations of white citizensmaligned or mocked speakers of AAVE, castingdoubt on their intelligence and making theirdistinctive speaking patterns the object of racistridicule.
  • McLean, Va.: What about "Ebonics" -- do you think itsdetrimental to a large part of our society?• Robert MacNeil: Ebonics is another word for whatlinguists call the African American VernacularEnglish, a dialect of English. The controversy overEbonics arose when the Oakland, Calif. schoolsystem claimed that it was a different languageand therefore qualified for federal funds to financethe teaching of ESL, English as a SecondLanguage. The furor that arose greatly confusedthe issue, which remains important in Americanschools, and an obstacle to children from the innercities who have more trouble learning to read anda higher dropout rate than other Americanchildren.http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A4207-2005Jan12.html
  • Robert MacNeil:• In our TV series and book we explore an experiment inLos Angeles schools to teach 5th graders the differencebetween their home speech and mainstream AmericanEnglish. Steve Harvey, a popular radio host in LA and anAfrican American, says that to get on in this country "youneed to be bilingual." Unfortunately many teachers, blackand white, so look down on "street talk" that it prejudicesthem against the children, whom they sometimes treatas uneducable. The LA experiment is an effort to treatthe black dialect more sympathetically and without racistputdowns to bring the children along into standardEnglish.http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A4207-2005Jan12.html
  • Effects on Education• Many educational policies and servicesare determined based on a child’s nativelanguage. Students who speak languagesother than English may be eligible forspecial programs to help advance theirEnglish fluency.
  • "Ebonics"http://www.blifaloo.com/humor/ebonicssmprog.jpg
  • "Ebonics"• "African American Vernacular English"• or "Vernacular Black English."
  • Controversy• A wave of controversy followed the Oakland,Calif., school board decision on Dec. 18 to useEbonics, a dialect primarily used by AfricanAmericans across the country, as a method ofteaching standard English. The debate continuedat the University.http://www.pub.umich.edu/daily/1997/jan/01-17-97/news/ff.html
  • Linguistic Features• Ebonics is recognized as a social dialectby the American Speech, Language andHearing Association. Its earmarks includethe unconjugated use of verb "to be" - "Hebe hollering at us"
  • Linguistic Features• and dropping consonants at the end ofwords. Ebonics is also marked by doublenegatives, as in, "Didnt nobody seenothing."
  • Where does it stem from?• "I believe Ebonics stems from slavery,when my ancestors secretly learnedEnglish because they were not allowed toread or write. Such oppression impairedthem from standard English," Moore said."But today, we see the great-great-grandchildren of those enslaved, who notonly eloquently speak standard English,but are prominent citizens of our country.http://www.pub.umich.edu/daily/1997/jan/01-17-97/news/ff.html
  • language and discrimination• "One such person was Dr. Martin Luther KingJr."• "When I think of Dr. King, I envision a man withnot only an open mind, but an open heart - onewho wanted the best for the world at whole," shesaid. "I believe Dr. King would agree to tryinganything in hopes of reaching equality."• Lippi-Green is writing a book about language anddiscrimination that may come with it, "Englishwith an Accent: Language, Ideology, andDiscrimination in the United States."
  • Ebonics is detrimental to thedevelopment of students• "As an African American, I am quitedisturbed over the recent Ebonics issue. Ifeel that incorporating Ebonics into theclassroom environment will furtherdeteriorate an already battered Englishlanguage," Austin said. "More importantly,using Ebonics in schools promotes andperpetuates the widening gap betweenCaucasians, African Americans and otherminority groups."http://www.pub.umich.edu/daily/1997/jan/01-17-97/news/ff.html
  • Nuances of terminology• The phrase "Ebonics" was developed in1973 and is known to have roots in WestAfrica.• The word is a combination of "ebony" and"phonics," and refers to the dialect spokenprimarily by some African Americans.
  • Disgrace• "Our slave ancestors had no choice but tospeak a broken, tattered form of English,as they were not given the education tospeak properly," Austin said. "If we as apeople continue to speak as if we lackeducation we are both disgracing thememory of our ancestors struggles tomake the world better for us, and we aredisgracing ourselves."
  • AAVE• Lippi-Green said she prefers to call itAfrican American Vernacular English.• "AAVE is a functioning, productional formof English. The misfortune is that peoplerefuse to listen," she said. "People need tobe more open-minded."
  • Reaction• University NAACP President LorenMcGhee said Ebonics is a step in thewrong direction.• "Insinuating that black students do nothave the intellectual capacity to learnStandard English is not only politicallyincorrect, but racist in itself," she said.
  • Reaction• Jackson is not the only black person whohas voiced his opinion. Poet MayaAngelou and talk-show host OprahWinfrey both disagree with the idea ofEbonics. However, it does havesupporters, including Pulitzer Prize-winning author and Princeton UniversityProf. Toni Morrison.
  • • "African Americans as a group have beensystematically excluded in this society forgeneration. It has been a constantstruggle for all of us to succeed in thiscountry, to improve our lives incomparison to the lives of our ancestors,"Austin said. "I feel as if promoting Ebonics- a gross and degrading deviation ofstandard English - will only push ourprogress as a people back a few hundredyears."
  • • Lippi-Green said Ebonics causes such a hotdebate because it raises an important question,which needs to be addressed.• "Why are people threatened of an idea thatAAVE speakers refuse to be in themainstream?" she said.• She said white people know they are notsupposed to discriminate, but cannot understandwhy a community still wants to remain different.http://www.pub.umich.edu/daily/1997/jan/01-17-97/news/ff.html
  • • Fairfax, Va.: I heard what you saidyesterday on NPR re: Black English andagree completely. I wish wed stopmaligning it and study it seriously as adialect the way we do other regional orethnic dialects. I think its a subtle form ofracism. We did the same thing with jazz,thinking it primitive, and now know it is oneof the most sophisticated music forms outthere.
  • • Robert MacNeil: Right on!I would like to thank you all, yall, youns,yinz for your interesting questions and Iwill leave you with what is fast becomingthe universal American form of address,so thanks you guys.
  • A Prayer???• English:Our Father, who art in heavenHallowed be thy nameThy Kingdom comeThy will be doneOn earth as it is in heavenGive us this day our daily breadAnd forgive us our trespassesAs we forgive those who trespass against usAnd lead us not into temptationBut deliver us from evilFor thine is the Kingdom, the power and the glory,forever and ever.Amenhttp://members.aol.com/midevlman/ebonics.htm
  • Ebonics:•Yo, Big Daddy upstairsYou be chillinSo be yo hoodYou be sayin it, I be doin itIn this here hood and yosGimme some eatsAnd cut me some slack, BloodSos I be doin it to dem dat diss medont be pushing me into no jiveand keep dem Crips awayCause you always be da ManAaa-men
  • A Prayer???• English:Our Father, who art inheavenHallowed be thy nameThy Kingdom comeThy will be doneOn earth as it is inheavenGive us this day ourdaily breadAnd forgive us ourtrespassesAs we forgive those whotrespass against usAnd lead us not intotemptationBut deliver us from evilFor thine is theKingdom, the power andthe glory, forever andever.Amenhttp://members.aol.com/midevlman/ebonics.htm•Yo, Big Daddy upstairsYou be chillinSo be yo hoodYou be sayin it, I be doin itIn this here hood and yosGimme some eatsAnd cut me some slack,BloodSos I be doin it to dem datdiss medont be pushing me into nojiveand keep dem Crips awayCause you always be da ManAaa-men
  • http://www.domenicfamily.net/kevin/ebonics.html
  • Ebonics Translatorhttp://www.billism.com/eng_to_ebon_trans.html
  • Ebonics Lesson & Samples(Warning: some obscene language)http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iw5cN6neql8
  • Famous Well-educated African-Americans
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_KKLkmIrDk
  • A Prayer???• English:Our Father, who art inheavenHallowed be thy nameThy Kingdom comeThy will be doneOn earth as it is inheavenGive us this day ourdaily breadAnd forgive us ourtrespassesAs we forgive those whotrespass against usAnd lead us not intotemptationBut deliver us from evilFor thine is theKingdom, the power andthe glory, forever andever.Amenhttp://members.aol.com/midevlman/ebonics.htm•Yo, Big Daddy upstairsYou be chillinSo be yo hoodYou be sayin it, I be doin itIn this here hood and yosGimme some eatsAnd cut me some slack,BloodSos I be doin it to dem datdiss medont be pushing me into nojiveand keep dem Crips awayCause you always be da ManAaa-men