A Green Toolkit for Existing Neighborhoods

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  • AIA Providers can use their own PowerPoint template as long as it doesn’t have your company logos. To personalize this slide, please insert your company name in the purple area. You may change the color used in the text. You might also want to add your provider number and the course/session number so the attendees have all of the information about your course right up front. All other wording on this slide is mandatory and cannot be changed.
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  • Existing neighborhoods aren’t blank sheetsWe want to keep what makes them greatMidtown example – this one neighborhood has three distinct districts
  • In dense neighborhoods, parks take the place of back yardsEveryone needs a park within walking distanceHow do we do that?
  • In Galveston we took two approaches.
  • We proposed to transform the streets to create green fingers
  • And we proposed to create a plaza using already existing public property
  • Neighborhoods are not sustainable if they are not walkable. But in many of our bestneigborhoods we treat pedestrians as second class citizens.
  • Making a neighborhood friendly to pedestrians means making sidewalks wide enough. 10 feet is just barely enough for three people to walk alongside each other, but they’reexposed to sun and traffic. 15 feetis the minimum for a good urbansidewalks. 30 feetiswhatwewant in activitycenters.
  • It means making intersections safer.Here is Galveston. We proposed to reconfigure the intersections to make crossings shorter and discourage cars from speeding.
  • It also means dealing with barriers. Here, in Downtown/Eado, art and lighting would make crossing under the freeway less intimidating.
  • Parking takes up much of our city. Every surface parking lot takes up valuable land, increases walking distances, and makes streets unfriendly to pedestrians.
  • If we put the parking in garages, every space costs more than $10,000.
  • The best way to do that is to share parking among uses
  • And to share parking among multiple buildings and multiple owners.
  • A good street is surrounded by good buildings.
  • The buildings that are friendliest to the neighborhood are those that meet the sidewalk.
  • That’s governed by development regulations – but in many cases those regulations make good buildings illegal. We can change that and put rules in place that will create good buildings.
  • But none of those agencies, and none of those professionals, understand a neighborhood as well as the people who live there and work there.
  • We need to involve them in real ways.On washingotn avenue, we had them rate buildings
  • And we worked around tables, with the design team alongside the public, to prioritize projects.
  • The LEED for Neighborhood Development (LEED-ND) rating system is the result of a partnership between the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), and the Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU). First conceived in 2002, the rating system integrates the principles of smart growth, New Urbanism, and green building into the first national standard for green neighborhood development.
  • To personalize this slide, please insert your company name/logo and contact information in the purple area. You may change the color used in the text. Also, please remove the “sample last slide” lingo in the upper right hand corner of the page.
  • A Green Toolkit for Existing Neighborhoods

    1. 1. Christof Spieler, PE, LEED AP Mandi Chapa Director of Planning christof.spieler@morrisarc hitects.com Planner mandi.chapa@morrisarchit cts.com TRACK 2 GREEN ON THE OUTSIDE: A GREEN TOOLKIT FOR EXISTING NEIGHBORHOODS GULF COAST GREEN 2013
    2. 2. Morris Architects is a Registered Provider with The American Institute of Architects Continuing Education Systems (AIA/CES). Credit(s) earned on completion of this program will be reported to AIA/CES for AIA members. Certificates of Completion for both AIA members and non- AIA members are available upon request. This program is registered with AIA/CES for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product. Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation.
    3. 3. Course Description In October 2010, the AIA/CES system was updated with the new CES Discovery system, in that time we have transferred more than one million records. This new update has made it necessary to remind us of the AIA/CES policies and procedures, to introduce the “new” provider ethics, and to reintroduce the AIA/CES audits/quality assurance program. This presentation covers those areas giving providers the opportunity to feedback and input.
    4. 4. Learning Objectives At the end of this program, participants will be able to: 1. Explain why existing neighborhoods are more sustainable than typical greenfield development. 2. Identify the uses of a public street and prioritize them 3. Understand how public regulations and private markets make redevelopment more difficult 4. Identify the uses of a public street and priorities them 5. Know how to organize neighborhoods to lead their transformation.
    5. 5. If we want to build sustainable BUILDINGS, we need to build sustainable CITIES.
    6. 6. LBL.gov
    7. 7. LEED Platinum Auto-Oriented Building
    8. 8. 1. Understand Character.
    9. 9. DESIGN DISTRICT ARTS DISTRICT STUDENT DISTRICT
    10. 10. 2. Welcome Change.
    11. 11. 1 2
    12. 12. 3. Use the Market.
    13. 13. MARKET CONDITIONS L A N D VA L U E S
    14. 14. AgreeDisagree Agree/Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree/ Somewhat Disagree Disagree/Strongly Disagree Average (out of 6) 4.8 4.2 4.0 Q11. & Q12. Please indicate your level of agreement with each of the following statements (Range: 1-Strongly Disagree; 6: Strongly Agree) Traffic Engineers Inc. / City of Sugar Land
    15. 15. AgreeDisagree Agree/Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree/ Somewhat Disagree Disagree/Strongly Disagree Average (out of 6) 4.2 4.2 4.1 4.1 Q11. & Q12. Please indicate your level of agreement with each of the following statements (Range: 1-Strongly Disagree; 6: Strongly Agree) Traffic Engineers Inc. / City of Sugar Land
    16. 16. MIDTOWN LIVABLE CENTER Feasibility Findings Closing the Gap !"#$%& !"' $%& "$&& "' $&& "#$&& "( $&& ") $&& 5-Story Rental Residential 5-Story For-Sale Residential 5-Story Rental Residential, Minimal Parking Hi-Rise Rental Residential Office + Retail + Surplus Parking Residual Land Value – Mixed-Use Prototype Projects (All Projects With Ground Floor Commercial) Land Value Feasibility Threshold
    17. 17. Lenders Parking regulations Buyers Open space regulations Setback regulations Traffic impact regulations Builders Designer s Realtors
    18. 18. MIDTOWN LIVABLE CENTER
    19. 19. 4. Create Parks.
    20. 20. 5. Reimagine Streets.
    21. 21. 40% street and highway right of way 60% platted property
    22. 22. Through Traffic Local access Bikes Pedestrians Utilitie s Tree Canopy Open Space Parking Gathering Space Transit
    23. 23. # Rebuild St Emanuel from Commerce to Leeland Rebuild St. Emanuel from curb to curb, widening sidewalks to 10’ along both sides of the roadway incorporating angled parking to accommodate a greater number of parking spaces, and upgrading utilities. P9
    24. 24. 6. Value Pedestrians.
    25. 25. Houston: Midtown
    26. 26. ECONFIGURE STREETS FOR SAFETY PROPOSEDEXISTING
    27. 27. IMPROVE PED CROSSINGS
    28. 28. 7. Find Freedom in Transit.
    29. 29.  Frequent  Fast  Reliable  Easy to understand  High quality stations  Connects to major employment centers  Serves many kinds
    30. 30. No waiting for train Total trip time: 8 minutes
    31. 31. Just missed train (every 6 minutes) Total trip time: 14 minutes
    32. 32. Just missed train (every 15 minutes) Total trip time: 23 minutes
    33. 33. Walk the whole way Total trip time: 15 minutes
    34. 34. 8. Extend Access with Bikes.
    35. 35. .5 1 1.5 2
    36. 36. Midtown Houston Walk
    37. 37. Walk+Bike
    38. 38. Walk + Transit
    39. 39. Walk + Bike + Transit
    40. 40. Houston: Bayou Greenways
    41. 41. Houston: Near North Side
    42. 42. Houston Bikeshare
    43. 43. 9. Mix Uses.
    44. 44. Office Hotel Retail Restaurant Residential Civic
    45. 45. Home Lunch Boutique Grocery Stationery Store Work
    46. 46. Home Lunch Boutique Grocery Stationary Store Work
    47. 47. 10. Cultivate Institutions.
    48. 48. Main Street, Houston
    49. 49. 11. Integrate Parking.
    50. 50. PARKING FOR HOTEL, RETAIL INSTITUTE HOTEL OR RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL PARKING FOR RESIDENTIAL, RETA PARKING FOR INSTITUTE, RETAIL
    51. 51. MIDTOWN LIVABLE CENTER The proposed parking policies are designed to accommodate the projected parking demand. ParkingSpacesDemanded(atfullbuild-out) PARKING DEMAND
    52. 52. 12. Build Friendly Buildings.
    53. 53. BUILDING FRONTAGEWith the exception of historic buildings, most construction along the major thoroughfares and collectors has significant building setbacks. These setbacks can be further divided into those in which landscaping lies between the sidewalk and the building frontage and those in which surface parking lies between the building frontage and the sidewalk
    54. 54. PUBLIC RATING CHARACTERISTICS RATING PUBLIC RATING CHARACTERISTICS RATING
    55. 55. 13. Maintain what you build.
    56. 56. 14. Build Multidisciplinary Teams.
    57. 57. Architect Civil Engineer Traffic engineer Urban Planner Economi st Landscap e Architect Transportat ion Engineer
    58. 58. 15. Build Bridges Between Agencies.
    59. 59. Zoning Commissione r Ped-Bike Coordinat or Transi t Plann er Architec t Civil Engineer Public Services Administra tor Traffic engineer Public Works Engineer City Planner Urban Planner Economi st Landscap e Architect Transportat ion Engineer Parks Direct or
    60. 60. American Public Transportation Association Sustainability and Urban Design Standards Working Group http://www.aptastandards.com
    61. 61. 16. Involve the Public.
    62. 62. Develope r Resident Nonprofit Director Activist Zoning Commissione r Ped-Bike Coordinat or Transi t Plann er Architec t Civil Engineer Public Services Administra tor Traffic engineer Public Works Engineer City Planner Urban Planner Economi st Landscap e Architect Transportat ion Engineer Parks Direct or
    63. 63. Wash Ave Livable Centers Study
    64. 64. 17. Grow Champions.
    65. 65. DEVELOPMENT CAPACITY
    66. 66. Housto n
    67. 67. This concludes The American Institute of Architects Continuing Education Systems Course Christof Spieler THANK YOU FOR ATTENDING GREEN ON THE OUTSIDE: A GREEN TOOLKIT FOR EXISTING NEIGHBORHOODS Mandi Chapa christof.spieler@morrisarc hitects.com mandi.chapa@morrisarchite cts.com
    68. 68. Christof Spieler Mandi Chapa christof.spieler@morrisarc hitects.com mandi.chapa@morrisarchite cts.com Questions?

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