IntroductionAs the global economy continues to improve, the talent shortage will become morepronounced. Organizations that...
Global Research Highlights:    The majority of organizations today are not offering formal training or    apprenticeship p...
Prevalence of Formal Trainingand Apprenticeship ProgramsGLOBAL:The majority of organizations worldwide don’t offer formal ...
Global                     45%                          53%                    2%   Americas                              ...
Asia Pacific:       Formal training most widespread as region’s employers strive to meet demand       for professional tal...
in Ireland, employers report a considerably different attitude to providing this kind ofdevelopment support, with just 3% ...
Lack internal HR expertise to develop the program                                      16%                                ...
Skilled manual trades jobs (e.g. welders)                                                                                 ...
28%          Entry-level                                       29%                                                        ...
Almost eight in 10 (79%) organizations in the Americas that offer training for the unskilled job       category target ent...
Training for specific roles is most likely to be directed at the skilled trades, where the region       has seen a shortag...
Where companies seek out a partner organization to help deliver formal training, this is mostcommonly a private-sector tra...
Those employers who do partner with external organizations are most likely to work with aprivate-sector training provider ...
Global                                45%                                                            54%                  ...
Leveraging Talent Through Training: A ManpowerGroup Research Report
Leveraging Talent Through Training: A ManpowerGroup Research Report
Leveraging Talent Through Training: A ManpowerGroup Research Report
Leveraging Talent Through Training: A ManpowerGroup Research Report
Leveraging Talent Through Training: A ManpowerGroup Research Report
Leveraging Talent Through Training: A ManpowerGroup Research Report
Leveraging Talent Through Training: A ManpowerGroup Research Report
Leveraging Talent Through Training: A ManpowerGroup Research Report
Leveraging Talent Through Training: A ManpowerGroup Research Report
Leveraging Talent Through Training: A ManpowerGroup Research Report
Leveraging Talent Through Training: A ManpowerGroup Research Report
Leveraging Talent Through Training: A ManpowerGroup Research Report
Leveraging Talent Through Training: A ManpowerGroup Research Report
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Leveraging Talent Through Training: A ManpowerGroup Research Report

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To investigate the extent to which organizations use formal training and apprenticeship programs to develop their talent, ManpowerGroup conducted research among nearly 24,000 employers in 41 countries and territories. The research explores three distinct categories of employee: professional roles, skilled manual trades jobs and unskilled positions, and reveals the specific job roles where this kind of employee development is most likely to be targeted.
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Leveraging Talent Through Training: A ManpowerGroup Research Report

  1. 1. IntroductionAs the global economy continues to improve, the talent shortage will become morepronounced. Organizations that dramatically reduced their workforce during therecession will be competing for talent in a continued challenging environmentwhere the talent supply often does not meet demand. To avoid a globalemployability crisis, employers must adopt long-term workforce strategies alignedwith their business strategy to replace “just in time” hiring as their main focus, as“on-demand” talent will simply no longer be available.The solution is to think more long term about talent and how to ensure it remainsin adequate supply (see ManpowerGroup’s “Manufacturing” Talent for the HumanAge) by implementing a workforce strategy that effectively forecasts the needs ofthe business, the talent required to achieve their goals, and where they can findit. Employers must also be more innovative and flexible in terms of developing thetalent they need. This approach must include investments in training for specific keyjob roles.To investigate the extent to which organizations use formal training andapprenticeship programs to develop their talent, ManpowerGroup conductedresearch among nearly 24,000 employers in 41 countries and territories. Theresearch explores three distinct categories of employee: professional roles, skilledmanual trades jobs and unskilled positions, and reveals the specific job roleswhere this kind of employee development is most likely to be targeted. It also givesinsight on how organizations are structuring and delivering these programs, whilehighlighting the training methods which employers find most effective. Findingsalso detail local labor market issues which drive the need for customized talentdevelopment programs. Finally, the research asks those organizations that don’tcurrently offer tailored training to employees to explain why this is the case. One in three employers worldwide cannot find the business-critical talent they need and the majority of employers cite candidate-specific reasons for being unable to fill positions. Companies must take steps to secure their talent pipeline for the long-term and bridge this talent gap. Read how in “Manufacturing” Talent for the Human Age.
  2. 2. Global Research Highlights: The majority of organizations today are not offering formal training or apprenticeship programs to develop employees for specific job roles, begging the question “Where will workers with the right skills come from?” Among the major barriers to offering training programs: organizations believe they are too small, they lack the HR expertise to create and deliver these programs, or they believe training is too costly. For organizations that do offer training for specific job roles, candidates’ lack of relevant “hard skills” coupled with company requirements for specialized training are the two most pressing factors driving employers to create their own formal training programs today. Formal training is most widespread among Asia Pacific organizations, as employers here strive to meet the region’s growing demand for professional talent. In contrast, employers in Europe have the “buy-versus- build” mentality when it comes to talent, offering fewer developmental opportunities than their global counterparts. Training efforts worldwide most often focus on professional talent, with companies saying developing sales skills is a key priority as they look to drive revenue growth. Engineering and skilled trades round out the top three roles employers are targeting with their development initiatives. The majority of the world’s organizations are rolling up their sleeves and doing it themselves when it comes to training for specific job roles, while others are most frequently partnering with private-sector training providers. U.S. companies most often take the DIY approach. According to employers, an on-the-job approach to training is the most prevalent and effective method of developing talent for specific roles, followed by in-house classroom training and mentoring. Employers cite online/virtual courses as being least effective. Effectiveness gap analysis shows organizations should be making more use of formal courses created with external partners. This is an opportunity for employers to boost the effectiveness of their development programs by utilizing these methods more often. M a n p o w e r G r o u p R e s e a r c h - L e v e r a g i n g Ta l e n t T h r o u g h T r a i n i n g | 3
  3. 3. Prevalence of Formal Trainingand Apprenticeship ProgramsGLOBAL:The majority of organizations worldwide don’t offer formal training; Employees inEurope least likely to be trained.Worldwide, about four in 10 organizations taking part in the research offer a formal trainingor apprenticeship program for specific job roles—the majority do not. On a regional basis,employees in Europe are least likely to be trained by their employers while those in AsiaPacific encounter training opportunities most often. Formal training opportunities aimed atplugging specific skills gaps are most likely to be offered in Taiwan (74%) and India (72%),and use of this kind of program is well above average in Brazil (65%), Turkey (63%) andSlovakia (63%). Meanwhile, formal training is considerably less common in some of theEuropean countries, with just 3% of Irish employers and 16% of Swedish firms saying theyoffer formal training to employees.Employers Offering Formal Training/Apprenticeship Programs Employers Offerings Formal Training/Apprenticeship ProgramsQ: Does your organization have a formal training program or apprenticeship program for specific job roles? Global 45% 53% 2% Americas Yes 46% 52% 2% No Asia Pacific 51% 45% 4% Don’t Know Europe* 39% 60% 1% Why Organizations Don’t Offer Formal Training ProgramsEmployers not currently offering formal programs say the main reason for this is that they 48%can ultimately findNthe ncandidates with nthe skillsd they need in the labor market (48%). Size ot eeded as can fi d candi ates 57%of the organization is also an important k i l l s w ewithe 37% saying a key reason for not offering w i t h t h e s factor, n e d 46% 45%formal staff development programs is that their organization is too small. It should be noted, 37%however,athat t i o n t o o s m a l l f o r seeskmany f small rorganizations that implement creative 3 7 % Org niza ManpowerGroup t h i s i n d o p r o g a m and 23%cost-effective ways to train staff and advises that companies should not allow size to be a 47%barrier when it comes to talent development. Confidence in the organizations’ HR resources 11% issue for many firms: 9% feel they 2 4 % the meansavailable for talent development is also an T o o c o s t l y lack 7%to deliver a formal program and 7% say they lack the internal HR expertise they feel they 7%would need to implement it. 9% 20% Lack of resources to deliver/run the program 8%Surprisingly, only around one in 10 (11%) organizations indicates that 5% it would be “too Global Americascostly” to train individuals with the skills they need. Correlating 7 % finding to those who this Asia Pacific 16%saying theyr n a l Hultimatelyi s e t othe v e l o p tthey need m the marketplace, we uncover the L a c k i n t e can R e x p e r t find d e talent h e p r o g r a in Europe 5%general belief among employers that they can still “buy” the % 2 talent they need, when theyneed it.*Includes data for Israel and South Africa M a n p o w e r G r o u p R e s e a r c h - L e v e r a g i n g Ta l e n t T h r o u g h T r a i n i n g | 4
  4. 4. Global 45% 53% 2% Americas Yes 46% 52% 2% NoAsia Pacific 51% 45% 4% Don’t Know Europe* 39% 60% 1%Why Organizations Don’t Offer Formal Training/Apprenticeship ProgramsQ: What are the primary reasonsOffer Formal Training Programs of program?Why Organizations Don’t your organization does not have this sort 48% Not needed as can find candidates 57% with the skills we need 46% 45% 37% Organization too small for this kind of program 37% 23% 47% 11% 24% Too costly 7% 7% 9% 20% Lack of resources to deliver/run the program 8% 5% Global Americas 7% Asia PacificLack internal HR expertise to develop the program 16% Europe 5% 2%Americas:HR expertise and funding to create and deliver programs a barrier to developingthe region’s talent. Skills Categories Targeted in Formal ProgramsAcross the Americas as a whole, 46% of employers offer formal training to specificcategories of staff, while 52% say they don’t offer this kind of staff development option. 64% 63%Employeesa are b s ( e . g . s a l e s benefitafrom this kind of opportunity in Brazil (65%),0MexicoP r o f e s s i o n l j o most likely to a s s o c i t e s ) 7 %(54%) and Argentina (52%), but the practice is least prevalent in Peru (36%)0 and Panama 6 %(38%). The percentage of organizations providing specific training rises slightly to 41% in 57%S k i l l UnitednStates.d e sthe e d m a u a l t r a 68% jobs (e.g. welders) 54% 53%Nearly six in 10 employers in the Americas not offering formal programs at this point intime say that a key reason for this is that they are, in fact, able to find candidatesawith 28% Glob l 43% Americasrelevant d j o b sin( e . g . laborr o o m a t t eEmployers here also feel % U n s k i l l e skills the m a i l market. n d a n t ) 2 3 more strongly than itheir global As a Pacific 22%counterparts that they cannot afford to develop their people. However, a closer o p e at the Eur lookdata reveals perhaps a more critical underlying issue that may have a long-term impact onthe region’s ability to compete globally—organizations here believe they have neither the HR Training Levels for Professional Jobsexpertise nor the resources to create and deliver programs required to develop the talentthey need. 47% All levels 42% 51% 45% 15% Senior-level 19% 6% 24% M a n p o w e r G r o u p R e s e a rG lh b-a lL e v e r a g i n g Ta l e n t T h r o u g h T r a i n i n g c o | 5 24% Americas Mid-level 26% Asia Pacific 17% Europe
  5. 5. Asia Pacific: Formal training most widespread as region’s employers strive to meet demand for professional talent. Formal training and apprenticeship programs are more prevalent in Asia Pacific than the other two regions ManpowerGroup polls, with 51% of organizations indicating that they make these programs available to staff in specific job roles, particularly those in the professional skills category. This finding intuitively makes sense, as many of these emerging market countries look to boost skills capabilities to capitalize on the increasingly global economy. Employers are most likely to offer role-specific training in Taiwan (74%) and India (72%). Opportunities are considerably less common in some other Asian labor markets; the incidence of formal programs in Hong Kong is just 32%, while in Singapore the proportion stands at 36%. In China, less than four in 10 employers offer formal training for specific job roles. Among the 45% of Asia Pacific employers who currently don’t offer formal training, just under half say they don’t need to do so because appropriately skilled candidates can be sourced. Just less than a quarter of the respondents say their organizations are too small to offer formal training, 8% feel they lack the necessary resources to deliver this training and 7% believe it would be too costly. Europe: Employer-based training and apprenticeships lag global counterparts as organizations believe they can continue to “buy” the talent they need. Fewer than four in 10 (39%) organizations in Europe offer formal training or apprenticeship programs to develop talent for specific job roles, with a considerable 60% indicating that training of this kind is not available to any employees. This was the lowest occurrence of employer-sponsored training among all the regions. When examining this result alongside responses from employers who do not believe individuals with the right skills are “too costly,” we uncover the belief that the skills can be bought in the marketplace at any time. And this mindset is, in part, driving the low occurrence of employerEmployers must training in the region. This is a real concern as many European countriesinvest in training are set to enter an unprecedented period of demographic shift, with oldertheir successors workers leaving the workforce and taking their skills and knowledge within order to be them. Employers must invest in training their successors in order to becompetitive in competitive in the future—and today that is not happening.the future—andtoday that is not Turkish and Slovakian employers are most likely to provide formalhappening. development opportunities for specific categories of staff, with 63% doing so in each of the two countries. Prevalence of formal training is also above average in the Czech Republic (56%) and France (54%). However, M a n p o w e r G r o u p R e s e a r c h - L e v e r a g i n g Ta l e n t T h r o u g h T r a i n i n g | 6
  6. 6. in Ireland, employers report a considerably different attitude to providing this kind ofdevelopment support, with just 3% offering formal programs. This finding is most certainlya direct result of the country’s persisting economic challenges as employers continuecost-cutting efforts. Training prevalence is also well below average in Sweden (16%), theNetherlands (23%), Poland (26%) and Spain (27%).Almost half (47%) the research participants not currently offering formal training say this isbecause their organization is too small. The other most common reason given is that theyare able to find candidates with the relevant skills (45%). Only a small proportion—7% ofEuropean employers—say they don’t offer formal training because it is too costly.Skills Categories and Levels Included in FormalTraining ProgramsGlobal:Training efforts worldwide most often focus on professional talent—developingsales skills a key priority.At a global level, organizations are most likely to use formal training programs to addresstalent shortages among the professional skills category. Driving the majority of theseprograms is the need to develop their sales people—a key component to driving revenue.Almost two in three take this approach, compared to 57% who offer formal training to skilledmanual trades workers and 28% doing so for unskilled staff.The research findings reveal employers target a wide variety of specific job roles with theirtraining programs. However, three categories stand out as a consistently high priority acrossall the regions; sales representatives, engineers and skilled manual trades roles are listedamong the top five priorities in all three regions and are the top three target job roles globallyfor training and apprenticeship programs. Each job role is cited as a primary training targetby more than one in 10 employers worldwide. Other job categories employers prioritize fordevelopment include middle management (9%), administrative and office support roles (8%),technicians (7%) and customer service representatives (7%). M a n p o w e r G r o u p R e s e a r c h - L e v e r a g i n g Ta l e n t T h r o u g h T r a i n i n g | 7
  7. 7. Lack internal HR expertise to develop the program 16% Europe 5% 2% Skills Categories Targeted in Formal Programs Skills Categories Targeted in Formal Programs Q: Which of the following job areas does your program include? 64% 63% Professional jobs (e.g. sales associates) 70% 60% 57% 68% Skilled manual trades jobs (e.g. welders) 54% 53% Global 28% 43% Americas Unskilled jobs (e.g. mailroom attendant) 23% Asia Pacific 22% Europe Training Levels for Professional Jobs In firms where training is offered to staff in the professional category, availability of programs is fairly evenly spread, with 71%Top Job Roles 47% offering this kind of development 2 % mid-level, 69% doing so at 4 at All levelsEmployers are 51% entry-level and 62% providing opportunities for senior-level staff. 45%Developing: Global Formal1training programs for skilled manual trades workers are 5% Senior-level 19%1. Sales Representatives more 6% likely to be targeted at mid-level (71%) and entry-level (69%) 24%2. Engineers staff than senior level employees (49%). aThe focus and need to Glob l 24%3. Skilled Manual Trades impart skills to entry-level staff should be cno surprise, given the 26% Ameri as Mid-level Asia Pacific4. Middle Managers fact that 1 7 %skilled trades have seenunew workforce entrants lose the 30% E rope interest in this career path over the over the past several decades5. Administrative/PAs/ 22% Office Support - l e v e l Entry and, as a result, vocational school curricula has not kept pace 20% 29% with business needs. Employers themselves are forced to bridge 15% those gaps. Formal programs targeting the unskilled job category are most commonly made available at the entry-level (82%), but a majority Trades Jobs Training Levels for Skilled Manual of organizations offering training in this category also do so at mid-level (60%). Training for more tenured staff for this category is an option in 46% of organizations. 41% 35% All levels 47% 40% 8% Senior-level 11% 4% 9% Global 30% 34% Americas Mid-level Asia Pacific 21% 35% Europe 28% Entry-level 29% M a n p o w e r G2 9 % p R e s e a r c h - L e v e r a g i n g Ta l e n t T h r o u g h T r a i n i n g rou | 8 25%
  8. 8. Skilled manual trades jobs (e.g. welders) 54% 53% 57% 68% Skilled manual trades jobs (e.g. welders) 28% 54%lobal G 43% 53% mericas AUnskilled jobs (e.g. mailroom attendant) 23% Asia Pacific 22% Europe Global 28% 43% Americas Unskilled jobs (e.g. mailroom attendant)Training Levels for Professional Jobs 23% Asia PacificTraining Levels for Professional Jobs 22% EuropeQ: And which levels does your program include? Training Levels for Professional Jobs 47% All levels 42% 51% 45% 47% All levels 15% 42% 19% 51% Senior-level 6% 45% 24% 15% Global Senior-level 1 9 %4 % 2 Americas 6% 26% Mid-level Asia Pacific 17% 24% Europe 30% Global 24% Americas Mid-level 22% 26% Asia Pacific 12 0 % 7% Entry-level Europe 2 9 %0 % 3 15% 22% Entry-level 20% 29% 15%Training Levels for Skilled Manual Trades JobsTraining Levels for Skilled Manual Trades Jobs Training Levels for Skilled Manual Trades JobsQ: And which levels does your program include? 41% 35% All levels 47% 40% 41% 8% 35% All levels 11% 47%Senior-level 4% 40% 9% 8% 11% Global Senior-level 30% 4% 34% Americas Mid-level Asia Pacific 9% 21% 35% Europe Global 30% 34% Americas Mid-level 28% 21% 29% Asia Pacific Entry-level 35% Europe 29% 25% 28% Entry-level 29% 29% 25%Training Levels for Unskilled Jobs Training Levels for Unskilled Jobs 41% All levels 30% 49% 47% 41% All levels 5% 30% 4% 49% Senior-level 7% Global 47% 5% Americas 5% 4% Asia Pacific Senior-level 1 9 % r o u p R e s e a r c h - L e v e r a g i n g Ta l e n t T h r o u g h T r a i n i n g ManpowerG | 9 7% 23% Europe Mid-level Global 5% 13% Americas 21% Asia Pacific 19%
  9. 9. 28% Entry-level 29% 29% 25% Training Levels for Unskilled Jobs Training Levels for Unskilled Jobs Q: And which levels does your program include? 41% All levels 30% 49% 47% 5% Senior-level 4% 7% Global 5% Americas Asia Pacific 19% 23% Europe Mid-level 13% 21% 41% Entry-level 49% 36% 34% Americas: Employers are most focused on skilled trades development. Employers in the Americas are more likely to use formal training for the skilled manual trades and unskilled categories than their counterparts in either Europe or Asia Pacific. These organizations are most likely to use formal training initiatives to develop staff for production operator job roles (11%): a considerably higher proportion than in other global regions surveyed. Programs for production operators, most certainly occurring in some form of apprenticeship, are particularly common in Argentina (22%) and Costa Rica (20%). Workers in three further jobTop Job Roles categories—administrative and office support, engineering andEmployers are skilled manual trades—are provided formal training options by oneDeveloping: Americas in 10 organizations.1. Production Operators Among those who offer formal training, nearly seven in 10 run2. Engineers programs for skilled manual trades employees and just under3. Skilled Manual Trades half offer programs for unskilled workers. Programs for the skilled4. Administrative/PAs/ manual trades are most often directed at mid-level workers (69%) Office Suport and entry-level staff (64%) than more senior employees (46%).5. Sales Representatives In addition, 63% of employers with active programs target the professional skills category. The majority of these programs for professionals focus on mid-level talent (68%), but more than three in five run entry-level programs (62%) and offer development for more senior staff (61%). M a n p o w e r G r o u p R e s e a r c h - L e v e r a g i n g Ta l e n t T h r o u g h T r a i n i n g | 10
  10. 10. Almost eight in 10 (79%) organizations in the Americas that offer training for the unskilled job category target entry-level staff. More than half offer this kind of program to mid-level staff, but only about one in three run programs for more tenured staff in this category. Asia Pacific: Building professional talent the priority for Asia Pacific organizations. The prevalence of training for the professional skills category is highest in Asia Pacific, where seven in 10 employers offering formal training programs target this category. Developing successful sales representatives is the top training priority here, with 16% targeting this specific job role in staff training initiatives. The effort to develop this role is most apparent in India and China, where one in four employers run formal sales team training, and in Japan, where the proportion is 20%. Asia Pacific employers also focus on engineers (14%) and middle managers (13%) for in-house development. In addition, 54% provide training programs for the skilled manual trades category, but only 23% do so for the unskilled roles. Asia Pacific employers tend to target professional training initiativesTop Job Roles more at the entry-level category than is the case in other regions,Employers are with one in eight providing these opportunities for new recruits.Developing: Asia Pacific Just over two-thirds target mid-level employees and nearly six in 10 run training designed for senior-level staff. Entry-level skilled1. Sales Representatives manual trades staff are also more likely to have access to training2. Engineers (76%) than those at mid-level (68%) or senior-level (51%).3. Middle Managers4. Skilled Manual Trades Meanwhile, more than eight in 10 employers providing training in the unskilled category focus their efforts on entry-level staff (85%).5. Customer Service Representatives More than half also target mid-level employees (62%) and more tenured workers (56%). Europe: Training for professionals may be more common, but employers cite skilled trades roles as top priority. Surprisingly, data reveals European employers are less likely to offer formal training opportunities in all three skills categories than their counterparts in other regions. As mentioned previously, the belief that talent can be obtained when needed is driving this less proactive training stance within the region. Six in 10 (60%) organizations offer training to professional staff, 53% offer skilled manual trades training programs and 22% provide initiatives which address the needs of employees in the unskilled category. M a n p o w e r G r o u p R e s e a r c h - L e v e r a g i n g Ta l e n t T h r o u g h T r a i n i n g | 11
  11. 11. Training for specific roles is most likely to be directed at the skilled trades, where the region has seen a shortage of this type of talent for many years (see ManpowerGroup Talent Shortage Survey, 2012)—14% of employers indicate that this is a priority. Skilled manual trades training programs are most likely to focus on mid-level employees (75%), compared to 65% targeting entry-level staff. Senior-level training programs are available in 49% of organizations. The development of skilled manual trades staff is most common in Ireland (34%), Switzerland (31%) and Poland (25%). However, European employers also prioritize the developmentTop Job Roles of administrative and office support staff (11%) and salesEmployers are representatives (10%). Among employers whose programsDeveloping: Europe include professional job categories, three in four conduct training specifically geared to mid-level employees. Almost seven in 101. Skilled Manual Trades target senior-level staff, and six in 10 make training opportunities2. Administrative/PAs/ available at entry-level. Office Suport3. Sales Representatives On the other hand, training opportunities for the unskilled category most commonly target entry-level staff (81%). However, almost4. Laborers seven in 10 employers (68%) who conduct talent development5. Engineers initiatives run programs for mid-level staff, and 52% do so for more tenured people. How Organizations Are Delivering Formal Training Programs Global: The majority of the world’s organizations are rolling up their sleeves and doing it themselves when it comes to training for specific job roles. More than half of organizations offering formal training—for any skills level—run their own development programs in house, but over four in 10 look to an outside organization to act as partner in the training delivery. The fact that the majority of organizations take training matters into their own hands suggests that proprietary systems and processes related to specific job roles necessitates this “do-it-yourself” approach. However, recent ManpowerGroup research also discovered that it’s not only the “hard” or technical skills that employers are looking to develop—new workforce entrants also often lack the “soft” skills they need. Working with a local partner on the delivery of training initiatives is most common in a number of European countries, most notably the Czech Republic (68%), Hungary (67%), Belgium (67%) and Austria (66%). Outside of Europe, the incidence of working with a partner is highest in Taiwan (63%). M a n p o w e r G r o u p R e s e a r c h - L e v e r a g i n g Ta l e n t T h r o u g h T r a i n i n g | 12
  12. 12. Where companies seek out a partner organization to help deliver formal training, this is mostcommonly a private-sector training provider (53%), although a considerable number turn tolocal educational institutions (35%), government (26%) and professional/trade associationbodies (26%) to deliver their programs.Training Program DeliveryTraining program delivered in conjunction with a local partner of solely by your organization? Q: Is this Program Delivery Global 45% 54% 1% Americas 35% 65% With A Partner We Do It OurselvesAsia Pacific 46% 53% 1% Don’t Know Europe 52% 47% 1% Americas:Training Methods Employers Are UsingOnly one-third of organizations partner for upskilling; U.S. companies most often 79%take the DIY approach. Global Americas 71%Almost two in three (65%) employers in the Americas deliver their own formal i programs 69% As a Pacific 66% 66% Europe 65%internally, without the need for external partners, the highest percentage of any region 59%surveyed. This suggests that companies in the region may be feeling the pain of the talent 57% 54%mismatch more than their counterparts in other regions and are taking more proactivemeasures to develop the specific skills they need. Meanwhile, 35% of organizations offering 46% 44%this training say the programs are delivered in conjunction with a partner. Brazilian employers 41% 41% 40% 40% 38%are most likely to look outside the company for support on training delivery (49%), and the 35% 34% 30% 30% 30%approach is also more common in Guatemala (45%) than other countries in the region. 27% 26% 25%Meanwhile, in the U.S., only 23% deliver training in conjunction with a partner organization. 21% 19% 18% 15%Across the region, 52% of those who work with a partner use a private-sector trainingprovider. Working with a local educational institution of some kind is reported by 35% and30% partner with government. On the other hand, partnerships are least prevalent withprofessional trade bodies or associations (24%), suggesting that skills development effortsamong this group lag behind those of other stakeholders. H C P M Fo sec O Fo du ee an la nl en - e rm to rm ca ss in r d to al r p al tio s- e/ co roAsia Pacific: ri on V co ro co na om ng ac ir /O tu ur vid ur l in hi (iOver half of organizations conduct training independently; those that do partner ng al se e se st n- n th le ho (p ) (l itu e- ar oc tiprefer private-sector providers. us ri r ni jo va al on e) ng b teAsia Pacific employers are slightly more likely to run their own formal programs in house )Most Effective work withof partner (46%). Across(53%) than to Methods a Training – by Region the region, working with an external partneris most common in Taiwan (63%), Australia (57%) and Singapore (51%), but the practice isconsiderably less widespread in India (20%) and China (28%). 82% 80% Global 76% Americas Asia Pacific M a n p o w e r G r o u p R e s e a r c h - L e v e r a g i n g Ta l e n t T h r o u g h T r a i n i n g | 13 Europe 68% 62% 61% 61% 0% 9% %
  13. 13. Those employers who do partner with external organizations are most likely to work with aprivate-sector training provider (53%) in upskilling their talent. More than a third (37%) delivertraining in conjunction with a local educational institution, 31% work with government and29% have links with professional or trade association bodies.Europe:Training partnerships more common in Europe; government cooperative effortsleast popular.Delivery of formal programs in conjunction with a partner is more common in Europe thanin any other region—more than half (52%) work with an external partner to deliver training,while 47% run programs in house. The use of external providers is particularly common inthe Czech Republic (69%), Belgium (67%) and Hungary (67%). The incidence of partneringis also above average among Austrian (66%), Italian (65%) and Slovakian(64%) organizations.Where employers work with an external partner, it’s most likely to be with a private-sectortraining provider (54%). One in three (34%) works with a local educational institutionand 25% with a professional or trade body. The proportion working with government todeliver this kind of program is smaller (18%) in Europe than in any of the other regions,suggesting that governments here could be doing more to help develop the skills of thenational workforce.Most Common Methods of Employer Training andTheir EffectivenessGlobal:On-the-job approach to training is viewed as most effective, while online/virtuallearning least productive. Effectiveness gap shows organizations should bemaking more use of formal courses created with external partners.The data reveals that organizations today are utilizing a broad range of methods to deliverformal training programs in an effort to develop specific skills capabilities in their workforce.The most frequently used approach worldwide is hands-on/on-the-job training, which is partof 69% of existing programs. In-house classroom sessions are part of the program for 59%and peer coaching is used in 44% of formal training programs. Four in 10 employers usementoring in their programs. Formal courses provided by private-sector training providersare offered in 34% of organizations, while courses run through local educational institutionsare incorporated into the program by 21%. Just one-quarter use online/virtual learningmethods to develop skills for specific job roles. M a n p o w e r G r o u p R e s e a r c h - L e v e r a g i n g Ta l e n t T h r o u g h T r a i n i n g | 14
  14. 14. Global 45% 54% 1% Americas 35% 65% With A Partner We Do It OurselvesAsia Pacific 46% 53% 1% Don’t Know Europe 52% 47% 1% Training Methods Employers Are UsingTraining Methods Employers Are Using Q: What methods of training does your program include? 79% Global Americas 71% 69% Asia Pacific 66% 66% 65% Europe 59% 57% 54% 46% 44% 41% 41% 40% 40% 38% 35% 34% 30% 30% 30% 27% 26% 25% 21% 19% 18% 15% H C P M Fo sec O Fo du ee an la nl en - e rm to rm ss in r d to al r p al o s- e/ co ro ca ri on V co ro co na om ng ac ti ir /O tu ur vid ur in hi (i ng al se e se st n- n l th le ho (p ) (l itu e- ar oc ti us ri r ni jo va al on e) ng b te )Most Effective Methods of Training – by Region As a general rule, the more frequently a particular training method is used, the more likely organizations are to view it as effective. This correlation should be no surprise. On-the- 82% 80% job training is believed to have been a particularly effective approach by 76% b a lthose G l o of 76% Americas who include it in their program, while 59% say in-house classroom sessions ihave cproved As a Pa ific effective where these have been part of the training process. Perhaps mostusurprising, E rope 68% 62% employers are least likely to choose online methods and formal courses delivered in local 61% 61% 60% 59% 58% 57% education institutions as being among the most effective methods of delivering skills for 56% 55% 54% 53% 52% 52% specific job roles. This finding suggests that company processes, which have become so 50% 49% 48% 48% 48% 47% specialized, are making broader-based training methods less useful to employers. It also 43% 41% confirms the current belief of many employers that education has not kept pace with the 39% 37% needs of business. 32% M a n p o w e r G r o u p R e s e a r c h - L e v e r a g i n g Ta l e n t T h r o u g h T r a i n i n g | 15 H C M Fo sec P Fo du O ee an la nl en - e rm to rm ca ss in r d to al r al ti s- e/ co ro ri on V co co om ng ac ir

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