Stakeholder involvement: The magic of timing
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Stakeholder involvement: The magic of timing

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Getting the right people involved at the right time on your projects comes down to defining what you need, who can support it, and when you need them. Sounds easy but it’s not when you consider ...

Getting the right people involved at the right time on your projects comes down to defining what you need, who can support it, and when you need them. Sounds easy but it’s not when you consider project stakeholder schedules and competing projects. Get some tips for how to get what you need when you need it.

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Stakeholder involvement: The magic of timing Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Stakeholder Involvement The Magic of Timing Your presenter is: Alison Sigmon, M.Ed., LPC, PMP1
  • 2. What’s on tap for our time together today… Getting the right people involved at the right time and doing the right work for your projects comes down to defining what you need, who can support it, and when you need them. Sounds easy but it’s not when you consider project stakeholder schedules, competing projects, and uncertain attitudes. Before you can do any of this, it’s important to understand who the highest priority stakeholders at key points in the project, their expectations and attitudes about the project, and role they need to play. Today we’re going to look at Stakeholder Mapping as a tool to help you determine these things. Agenda  Revolving door…reality of today’s project stakeholder  Collaboration: Power of purpose & recognition  Stakeholder Mapping: Let the tool work for you  Wrap it up! 2
  • 3. Revolving door: Reality of today’s project stakeholder Ebb & Flow of Stakeholders 3
  • 4. Having a stake in it A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) breaks down a stakeholder as a person or organization that: • Is actively involved in the project • Has interests that may be positively or negatively affected by the performance or completion of the project • May exert influence over the project, the deliverables, or the team members Basically, a stakeholder is anyone (or any other project) involved in or somehow affected by the project. 4
  • 5. Skipping across the circles… Stakeholder structure is a lot like concentric circles The more directly involved in the day-to-day activities of a project, the closer to the center of the concentric circles the stakeholder will be. Position on the circles changes over the life of the project based on the type of work needed. Marketing Graphic artist Copywriter User experience Sponsor System architect Content Analyst Core team Programmer Quality Assurance Product designer Customer 5
  • 6. Keeping it tight keeps you flexible To maximize efficiency and response to global demands of business, stakeholders may come and go at regular intervals on a project. For this to be as seamless as possible, processes must be streamlined and tight. And where does this start? With the project manager and the tools used 6
  • 7. Working together- it’s our nature Collaboration: Power of Purpose & Recognition 7
  • 8. Cooperation is in our nature Given some of the unscrupulous, self- centered activities in business over the years, might be hard to believe that it’s actually human nature to work together. Study noted in a recent edition of Scientific Americanmagazine found that of all species humans can be considered “super- cooperators.” It’s this cooperation that has perpetuated the human race. For example: While we compete to “climb the corporate ladder,” we still work together to make sure the company succeeds against competitors. While we work to provide for our families, we are still very philanthropic. When a crisis occurs, we think nothing of dropping our priorities and even sacrificing our personal well-being to help others. 8
  • 9. Credibility and reputation rule Research shows our cooperative tendencies stem primarily from two things: • Receiving credible information about a problem or issue • Being generous in an effort and desire to preserve reputation 9
  • 10. Watch and be watched So what does this mean to projects? Projects mean change, and people typically resist change. When there’s authoritative information about the need for the change, stakeholders are more likely to embrace it. Also, when stakeholders know they are being observed through a variety of types of assessment, they may be more likely to be cooperative and supportive. 10
  • 11. Cue the tool to engage and influence Using tools such as Stakeholder Mapping throughout the project gives project teams an opportunity to assess and validate the scope and assumptions of the project to date. It also gives project teams a chance to assess stakeholder expectations, assumptions, and attitudes about the project. It’s that analysis that project managers can use to open (or reopen in some cases) dialogue with stakeholders about the project objectives and deliverables. It lets stakeholders know you’ve given consideration for what they are thinking and care enough to explore their thoughts with them which creates an opportunity for cooperation over authoritarian direction. 11
  • 12. Right place, right time, right work Stakeholder Mapping: Strategy gets the job done 12
  • 13. Getting collective action is tricky Just as a politician pays close attention to the opinions of constituents, so must you as a project manager. Project politics is about getting collective action from a group of people who may have quite different interests. Being willing to use conflict creatively is important to influencing others. But don’t do it empty-handed. Take the time to understand the formal and informal structure and positions of key groups and individuals. 13
  • 14. Navigating the politics of projects A big part of navigating project politics is to get a handle on who the stakeholders are, what the stakeholders think the project is, aligning the project needs with stakeholder expectations, and getting clear on project roles. What’s tough about this is that it’s fluid. Stakeholders change. Expectations change. Opinions about objectives for your project vary among stakeholders. An effective way to respond to this complexity is to use the Stakeholder Mapping Tool. 14
  • 15. What is Stakeholder Mapping? • Formalizes how you think about stakeholders at a particular point in time. It also prioritizes stakeholders. • Identifies the web of groups and individuals whose expectations and attitudes will determine whether or not the deliverables get completed and accepted. • It also serves as an “early warning system” by identifying thosestakeholderswho have special communication needs.
  • 16. Stakeholder mapping process • Series of categories supported by a facilitation process that helps analyze project stakeholder expectations and attitudes about the project • Answers help identify stakeholder priority at that point in the project • Can be used repeatedly throughout the project in keeping with the ebb and flow of stakeholders • Supports strategy development for engagement • Helps the team see their blind spots in planning
  • 17. How does it work? Stakeholder Mapping: Assessment and engagement magic 17
  • 18. Stakeholder GROUP identification For each objective ask the questions below. Each time a stakeholder is repeated as an answer, place an asterisk next to the name. This will establish stakeholder group priority.  Who will receive the product or service delivered by meeting this objective?  Who will use it?  Who will approve it?  Who provides input to the deliverables?  Who is accountable for the deliverables?  Who could kill this project or significantly slow it down?  Who should be committed early in order to sell the project to others?  Are there any projects underway that should be considered as a stakeholders?
  • 19. Stakeholder expectation assessment For each group consider the following: What do we believe each group wants from the project? How might this group specifically measure success? How will they know their expectations are being met by the project?
  • 20. Determine stakeholder contact and next steps Ask the following to determine if stakeholder expectations align with the project scope as currently defined: • Does alignment exist between this group’s expectations and the current scope? • Are the expectations of this group in or out of scope? • What are the implications for action? For expectations not aligned with scope, determine the following: • Should scope be modified to include those expectations? • Should expectations be modified? • Should the expectation be “parked” for consideration at a later time?
  • 21. Stakeholder attitude assessment Make assumptions about each stakeholder’s attitude, but be sure to investigate your assumptions.
  • 22. Stakeholder role assessment For each stakeholder group consider what role the project needs them to commit to do. Sponsor? Core team member? One time contributor? Evaluator? Subject matter expert? Champion Liaison? No role? Team lead? Others? Vendor?
  • 23. Determine stakeholder contact and next steps This is where you pull it all together. Leverage your analysis to determine the following: • Who is the best person to recruit? • What involvement strategy will we use? • What’s the best way to involve him/her? Who on our team will contact them? • What tools or models are available to gain stakeholder support and involvement?” • What information are we missing about this stakeholder?
  • 24. When can Stakeholder Mapping be used? Stakeholder Mapping can be used throughout the project and for a variety of project activities. • Develop a project charter • Create a project plan • Develop a communications plan • Establish support when implementing a change • Consider who should be involved in the project • Address expectations and consider possible areas of conflict • Identify project assumptions, constraints, and risks 24
  • 25. Wrap up… Getting the right people involved at the right time and doing the right work for your projects comes down to defining what you need, who can support it, and when you need them. Sounds easy but it’s not when you consider project stakeholder schedules, competing projects, and uncertain attitudes. Before you can do any of this, it’s important to understand who the highest priority stakeholders at key points in the project, their expectations and attitudes about the project, and role they need to play. Stakeholder Mapping is a tool to help you determine these things. What we considered:  Revolving door…reality of today’s project stakeholder  Collaboration: Power of purpose & recognition  Stakeholder Mapping: Let the tool work for you Questions??? 25
  • 26. Thank you! www.systemation.com Alison Sigmon, M.Ed, LPC, PMP asigmon@systemation.com Twitter @alisonsigmon www.slideshare.net/ahsigmon www.mindscraping.com26