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    Navin gre Navin gre Document Transcript

    • About the GRE® General TestWhat Is It?The GRE® General Test is your gateway to graduate programs and an essential early step alongyour career path.Graduate programs and business schools use GRE® scores to evaluate your readiness for graduate-level work. The GRE General Test measures verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning, criticalthinking and analytical writing skills that are not related to any specific field of study. • Analytical Writing — Measures critical thinking and analytical writing skills, specifically the test takers ability to articulate complex ideas clearly and effectively • Verbal Reasoning — Measures reading comprehension skills and verbal and analogical reasoning skills, focusing on the test takers ability to analyze and evaluate written material • Quantitative Reasoning — Measures problem-solving ability, focusing on basic concepts of arithmetic, algebra, geometry and data analysis Important News for Test Takers: The GRE General Test is Changing. Who Takes It  Find Out What You Need to Know — and Why Its Good News forand Why? You. Each year, more than The GRE® revised General Test is Coming in August 2011! 600,000 prospective • New test-taker friendly design graduate school • New types of questions applicants from • SPECIAL 50% savings, limited-time offer approximately 230 countries take the Registration for the GRE revised General Test opens March 15, GRE General Test. 2011. Applicants come from If you need your scores before November 2011, take the varying educational current backgrounds and GRE General Test. To learn all about the revised test, go to the countries, and the GRE revised General Test section. GRE General Testprovides the only common measure for comparing their qualifications.GRE scores are used by admissions or fellowship panels to supplement undergraduate records,recommendation letters and other qualifications for graduate study.Where Do People Take It?The GRE General Test is offered year-round at computer-based test centers in the United States,Canada and many other countries. It is offered at paper-based test centers in areas of the worldwhere computer-based testing is not available. See which format is available in your area.Who Accepts It?The GRE General Test is accepted at more than 3,200 graduate and business schools as well asdepartments and divisions within these schoo
    • Test Content and StructureThe GRE® General Test is offered at computer-based test centers in the United States, Canada andmany other countries. It is offered at paper-based test centers in areas of the world where computer-based testing is not available. See which format is available in your area.Computer­based GRE General Test Content and StructureThe computer-based GRE General Test is composed of Analytical Writing, Verbal Reasoning andQuantitative Reasoning sections. The Analytical Writing section is always first. In addition, oneunidentified unscored section may be included and can appear in any position in the test after theAnalytical Writing section. Questions in the unscored section are being tested for possible use infuture tests, and answers will not count toward your scores. An identified research section that is notscored may also be included, and if so, it is always at the end of the test.The Verbal and Quantitative sections, including the unidentified unscored section, may appear inany order. Treat each section presented during your test as if it counts.Total testing time is three hours, not including the research section. The directions at the beginningof each section specify the total number of questions in the section and the time allowed for thesection.Typical Computer­based GRE General Test Typical computer-based GRE General Test Section Number of Questions Time 1 "Issue" Task1 45 minutesAnalytical Writing 1 "Argument" Task1 30 minutesVerbal Reasoning 30 30 minutesQuantitative Reasoning 28 45 minutesUnscored2 Varies VariesResearch3 Varies Varies1 For the "Issue" task, two essay topics are presented and you choose one. The "Argument" taskdoes not present a choice of topics; instead, a single topic is presented.2 Anunidentified unscored section may be included and may appear in any order after theAnalytical Writing section. It is not counted as part of your score.3 An identified research section that is not scored may be included, and it is always at the end of the Important News for Test Takers: The GRE General Test is test. Changing. Find Out What You Need to Know — and Why Its Good News for You. Paper­based  The GRE® revised General Test is Coming in August 2011! GRE General  • New test-taker friendly design Test Content  • New types of questions • SPECIAL 50% savings, limited-time offer and Structure Registration for the GRE revised General Test opens March 15, The paper-based GRE 2011. If you need your scores before November 2011, take the current GRE General Test. To learn all about the revised test, go to the GRE revised General Test section.
    • General Test is composed of Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning and Analytical Writingsections. In addition, one unidentified unscored section may be included, and this section canappear in any position in the test after the Analytical Writing section. Questions in the unscoredsection are being tested for possible use in future tests and answers will not count toward yourscores.Total testing time is up to 3¾ hours. The directions at the beginning of each section specify the totalnumber of questions in the section and the time allowed for that section.The Analytical Writing section is always first. For the "Issue" task, two topics will be assigned andyou will choose one. The "Argument" task does not present a choice of topics; instead, a singletopic will be presented.The Verbal and Quantitative sections may appear in any order, including an unidentified Verbal orQuantitative unscored section. Treat each section presented during your test as if it counts.Typical Paper­based GRE General Test Typical Paper-based GRE General Test Section Number of Questions Time 1 "Issue" Task1 45 minutesAnalytical Writing 1 "Argument" Task1 30 minutesVerbal (2 sections) 38 per section 60 minutesQuantitative (2 sections) 30 per section 60 minutesUnscored2 Varies 30 minutes1 For the "Issue" task, two essay topics will be presented and you will choose one. The "Argument"task does not present a choice of topics; instead, a single topic will be assigned.2 Anunidentified unscored section may be included and may appear in any order after theAnalytical Writing section. It is not counted as part of your score.Modified Versions of Verbal and Quantitative QuestionsThe test you take may include questions that are modified versions of published questions or ofquestions you have already seen on an earlier section of the test. Some modifications aresubstantial; others are less apparent.Even if a question appears to be similar to a question you have already seen, it may in fact bedifferent and have a different answer. Pay careful attention to the wording of each question.Analytical WritingThe Analytical Writing section of the GRE® General Test measures your ability to: • articulate complex ideas clearly and effectively • examine claims and accompanying evidence • support an argument with relevant reasons and examples • sustain a well-focused, coherent discussion • control the elements of standard written English (this factor plays a role only to the extent that poor writing skills impede readers understanding of the argument)
    • Important News for Test Takers: The GRE General Test is Changing. Test  Find Out What You Need to Know — and Why Its Good News forComponents You. The Analytical The GRE® revised General Test is Coming in August 2011! Writing section • New test-taker friendly design consists of two • New types of questions analytical writing • SPECIAL 50% savings, limited-time offer tasks: a 45-minute "Present Your Registration for the GRE revised General Test opens March 15, Perspective on an 2011. Issue" task and a 30- If you need your scores before November 2011, take the minute "Analyze an current Argument" task. GRE General Test. To learn all about the revised test, go to the GRE revised General Test section. • The "Issue" task states an opinion on an issue of general interest and asks you to address the issue from any perspective(s) you wish, as long as you provide relevant reasons and examples to explain and support your views. • The "Argument" task presents a different challenge — it requires you to critique an argument by discussing how well-reasoned you find it. You are asked to consider the logical soundness of the argument rather than to agree or disagree with the position it presents. • The "Issue" and "Argument" tasks are complementary in that the "issue" requires you to construct a personal argument about an issue, and the "argument" requires you to critique someone elses argument by assessing its claims.Verbal ReasoningThe Verbal Reasoning section of the GRE® General Test measures reading comprehension andverbal and analogical reasoning skills in a multiple-choice format.The Verbal Reasoning section measures your ability to: • analyze and evaluate written material and synthesize information obtained from it • analyze relationships among component parts of sentences • recognize relationships between words and concepts Important News for Test Takers: The GRE General Test is Changing. Test  Find Out What You Need to Know — and Why Its Good News forComponents You. There are four types The GRE® revised General Test is Coming in August 2011! of questions in the • New test-taker friendly design Verbal Reasoning • New types of questions section of the GRE • SPECIAL 50% savings, limited-time offer General Test: Registration for the GRE revised General Test opens March 15, • Analogies — 2011. Analogy If you need your scores before November 2011, take the questions test current your ability to GRE General Test. To learn all about the revised test, go to the recognize the GRE revised General Test section.
    • relationship between the words in a word pair and to recognize when two word pairs display parallel relationships. To answer an analogy question, you must formulate the relationship between the words in the given word pair and then select the answer containing those words most closely related to one another. Some examples are relationships of kind, size, spatial contiguity or degree. • Antonyms — Antonym questions measure the strength of your vocabulary and ability to reason from a given concept to its opposite. Antonyms may require only general knowledge of a word, or they may require that you make fine distinctions among answer choices. Answer choices may be single words or phrases. • Sentence Completions — Sentence completion questions measure your ability to use a variety of cues provided by syntax and grammar to recognize the overall meaning of a sentence and analyze the relationships among the component parts of the sentence. You select which of five words or sets of words can best complete a sentence to give it a logically satisfying meaning and allow it to be read as a stylistically integrated whole. • Reading Comprehension — Reading comprehension questions measure your ability to read with understanding, insight and discrimination. These questions explore your ability to analyze a written passage from several perspectives, including your ability to recognize explicitly stated elements as well as underlying statements or arguments and their implicationsQuantitative ReasoningThe Quantitative Reasoning section of the GRE® General Test measures your ability to: • understand basic concepts of arithmetic, algebra, geometry and data analysis • reason quantitatively • solve problems in a quantitative setting Important News for Test Takers: The GRE General Test is Changing. Test  Find Out What You Need to Know — and Why Its Good News forComponents You. There are three types The GRE® revised General Test is Coming in August 2011! of questions in the • New test-taker friendly design Quantitative • New types of questions Reasoning section of • SPECIAL 50% savings, limited-time offer the GRE General Test: Registration for the GRE revised General Test opens March 15, 2011. • Quantitative If you need your scores before November 2011, take the Comparison current — These GRE General Test. To learn all about the revised test, go to the questions test GRE revised General Test section. your ability to reason quickly and accurately about the relative sizes of two quantities or to perceive that not enough information is provided to make such a comparison. • Problem Solving — The format of these multiple-choice questions varies. The solution may require simple computations, manipulations or multistep problem-solving. • Data Interpretation — Some problem-solving questions involve data analysis. Many occur in sets of two to five questions that share common data in the form of tables or graphs that allow you to read or estimate data values.
    • GRE® Test Fairness and ValidityETS and the GRE® Program make ensuring the fairness and validity of GRE tests throughout thetest development, administration and scoring processes a high priority. To ensure that these goalsare reached, ETS has developed a meticulous system of internal checks and balances, and auditteams routinely verify that all tests and services meet rigorous professional standards such as thoseoutlined by the American Psychological Association, American Educational Research Associationand National Council on Measurement in Education. Important News for Test Takers: The GRE® General Test is Changing. Fairness Find Out What You Need to Know — and Why Its Good News forFairness concerns are You. an integral part of the The GRE® revised General Test is Coming in August 2011! development and scoring of all tests. • New test-taker friendly design The many activities • New types of questions that ensure fairness • SPECIAL 50% savings, limited-time offer include: Registration for the GRE revised General Test opens March 15, • involvement 2011. of minority If you need your scores before November 2011, take the educators and current representative GRE General Test. To learn all about the revised test, go to the committees in GRE revised General Test section. every phase of the development and scoring processes • multiple fairness evaluations by trained reviewers • routine analyses of test questions to establish that questions do not unfairly contribute to group differences • rigorous training for all persons involved in the development or scoring of test questions to ensure that all examinees have an equal opportunity to demonstrate their skills and abilities • appropriate accommodations (e.g., ZoomText®, extra time) for examinees who may need themValidityValidity research and analyses establish that the test measures what it is supposed to measure. TheGRE Program has documented evidence of the following types of validity in GRE tests: • construct validity (the test measures the skills/abilities that should be measured) • content validity (the test measures appropriate content) • predictive validity (the test predicts success) • consequential validity (the test demonstrates that adverse consequences are minimal) • external validity (the test has the expected relationship with other measures of the same construct)Although ETS works to accumulate validity evidence at each stage of the delivery and scoringprocess, the initial impetus for validity research comes from feedback from members of thegraduate school community, who provide information about the skills and abilities that theyconsider essential for success in graduate school.
    • Verbal MeasureThe Verbal measure of the GRE® General Test measures verbal reasoning skills. These skills havebeen identified by graduate deans and faculty as critical for success in graduate school. Thecapabilities that are assessed include: • the ability to understand text (such as the ability to understand the meanings of sentences, to summarize a text, or to distinguish major points from irrelevant points in a passage) • the ability to interpret discourse (such as the ability to draw conclusions, to infer missing information or to identify assumptions).Quantitative MeasureThe Quantitative measure of the GRE General Test measures quantitative reasoning skills. Theskills assessed are consistent with capabilities outlined in the Mathematical Association ofAmericas Quantitative Reasoning for College Graduates: A Complement to the Standards and arebased on feedback from faculty surveys. The capabilities that are assessed in the GRE Quantitativemeasure include: • reading and understanding quantitative information • interpreting and analyzing quantitative information, including drawing inferences from data • using mathematical methods to solve quantitative problemsFrequently Asked Questions About the GRE® General TestTest ContentWhat skills does the GRE General Test measure? The Verbal Reasoning section measures your ability to: • analyze and evaluate written material and synthesize information obtained from it • analyze relationships among component parts of sentences • recognize relationships between words and concepts The Quantitative Reasoning section measures your ability to: • understand basic concepts of arithmetic, algebra, geometry and data analysis • reason quantitatively • solve problems in a quantitative setting The Analytical Writing section measures your ability to: • articulate complex ideas clearly and effectively • examine claims and accompanying evidence • support ideas with relevant reasons and examples • sustain a well-focused, coherent discussion • control the elements of standard written English (this factor plays a role only to the
    • extent that poor writing skills impede readers understanding of the argument) Important News for Test Takers: The GRE General Test is What is the Analytical Changing. Writing section like? Find Out What You Need to Know — and Why Its Good News for You. The Analytical The GRE® revised General Test is Coming in August 2011! Writing section consists of two • New test-taker friendly design analytical • New types of questions writing tasks: a • SPECIAL 50% savings, limited-time offer 45-minute Registration for the GRE revised General Test opens March 15, "Present Your 2011. Perspective on If you need your scores before November 2011, take the an Issue" task current and a 30-minute GRE General Test. To learn all about the revised test, go to the "Analyze an GRE revised General Test section. Argument" task. The "Issue" task states an opinion on an issue of general interest and asks you to address the issue from any perspective(s) you wish, as long as you provide relevant reasons and examples to explain and support your views. The "Argument" task presents a different challenge — it requires you to critique an argument by discussing how well–reasoned you find it. You are asked to consider the logical soundness of the argument rather than to agree or disagree with the position it presents. The "Issue" and "Argument" are complementary in that the "Issue" requires you to construct a personal argument about an issue, and the "Argument" requires you to critique someone elses argument by assessing its claims.Are there examples of what the essay questions look like? Yes. You can view the "Issue" topics and the "Argument" topics for the Analytical Writing section on this website. In addition, scored sample essays with commentary from GRE® readers are available for the "Issue" task and the "Argument" task.How does the Analytical Writing section differ from the Verbal section of the GRE General Test? Because the Analytical Writing section is a performance test, you must organize and articulate your own ideas as you discuss a complex issue as well as explain the logical soundness of an argument you have just read. The Verbal section of the GRE General Test measures reading comprehension, and verbal and analogical reasoning skills in a multiple-choice format. Whereas the Verbal section measures your ability to understand complex ideas expressed in written passages and in the relationships between words, the Analytical Writing section measures your ability to articulate and support ideas, and to analyze arguments.How does the Analytical Writing section differ from the TOEFL® (TWE®) Test? The TOEFL and GRE Analytical Writing measures are very different. The TOEFL TWE Test is not designed to measure higher levels of thinking and analytical writing, but centers instead on command of English vocabulary, grammar, spelling and syntax. Therefore, scores on the
    • two tests are not at all comparable. Because the TOEFL test emphasizes fundamental writing skills, the TOEFL score can supplement an Analytical Writing score by helping faculty determine whether a low score on the GRE Analytical Writing measure is due to lack of familiarity with English or lack of ability to produce and analyze logical arguments.Test AdministrationWhat is the price of the GRE General Test? The GRE General Test fees range from $160 to $205. See the fees section for detailed pricing and fee reduction information.How is the GRE General Test administered? The GRE General Test is given year-round as a computer-based test in the United States, Canada and many other countries. Paper-based GRE General Test administrations are offered in areas of the world where computer-based testing is not available.Computer­based GRE General TestHow does the computer-based GRE General Test work? The Verbal and Quantitative Reasoning sections of the GRE General Test are adaptive tests. They are tailored to your performance level and provide precise information about your abilities using fewer test questions than traditional paper-based tests. At the start of the test, you are presented with test questions of moderate difficulty. As you answer each question, the computer scores it and uses that information, as well as your responses to preceding questions and information about the test design, to determine the next question. As long as you answer correctly, you will typically be given questions of increasing difficulty. When you respond incorrectly, you will typically be given less difficult questions. Because the computer scores each question before selecting the next one, you must answer each question when it is presented. For this reason, once you answer a question and move on to another, you cannot go back and change your answer. The computer has already incorporated both your answer and the requirements of the test design into its selection of your next question. On the Analytical Writing section, the two writing tasks are displayed on the computer, and you must type your essay responses. For the "Issue" task you will be able to choose one of two essay topics selected by the computer from the pool of topics. The "Argument" task does not offer a choice of topics; the computer will present you with a single topic selected from the topic pool. The testing software uses an elementary word processor developed by ETS so that individuals
    • familiar or unfamiliar with a specific commercial word-processing software do not have an advantage or disadvantage. The software contains the following functionalities: inserting text, deleting text, cut and paste, undoing the previous action and scrolling.How can test takers be compared if the test is tailored to the individual? Each computer-based test meets established specifications, including the types of questions asked and the subject matter presented. The statistical characteristics of the questions answered correctly and incorrectly, including difficulty level, are taken into account in the calculation of scores. Therefore, it is appropriate to compare scores of different test takers even though they received different questions.Are scores earned on the computer-based General Test comparable to scores earned on the paper-based test? Yes. ETS has conducted research studies indicating that these scores are comparable.Do I need to be computer literate? No. You can take the test even if you have little or no previous computer experience. The test requires only basic computer skills, and these are covered in the hands-on tutorial you must complete before beginning the official timed test. The tutorial lets you try out the functions of the computer (e.g., mouse, scrollbar) that you will need to use during the test. The tutorial is also included in the GRE Powerprep software.What word processing software is used for the Analytical Writing section of the computer-basedtest? What tools does it have? The GRE® Program uses an elementary word processor developed by ETS so that individuals familiar or unfamiliar with a specific commercial word processing software do not have an advantage or disadvantage. The ETS software contains the following functions: • inserting text • deleting text • cutting and pasting • undoing the previous action Tools such as spell-checkers and grammar-checkers are not available in the ETS software, in large part to maintain fairness with regard to those examinees who handwrite their essays at paper-based administrations. You can practice writing essays using the word processor coTest Structure and Overview­­gmatHome > The GMAT > Test Structure and Overview • Print • Save • Email • Share • Digg • Yahoo Buzz
    • • Technorati • Delicious • StumbleUpon • Reddit • Facebook •The Graduate Management Admission Test® (GMAT®) consists of four separately timed sections. Format and Timing The GMAT exam consists of three main parts, the Analytical Writing Assessment, the Quantitativesection, and the Verbal section.You have three and a half hours in which to take the GMAT exam, but plan for a total time ofapproximately four hours.Analytical Writing AssessmentThe GMAT exam begins with the Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA). The AWA consists of twoseparate writing tasks—Analysis of an Issue and Analysis of an Argument. You are allowed 30minutes to complete each one.Quantitative SectionFollowing an optional break, you then begin with the Quantitative Section of the GMAT exam. Thissection contains 37 multiple-choice questions of two question types—Data Sufficiency and ProblemSolving. You are allowed a maximum of 75 minutes to complete the entire section.Verbal SectionAfter completion of the Quantitative Section (following an optional break), you begin the VerbalSection of the GMAT exam. This section contains 41 multiple choice questions of three questiontypes—Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and Sentence Correction. You are allowed amaximum of 75 minutes to complete the entire section.Computer­Adaptive FormatEach of the first two sections consists of an analytical writing task; the remaining two sections(Quantitative and Verbal) consist of multiple-choice questions delivered in a computer-adaptiveformat. Questions in these sections are dynamically selected as you take the test; the multiple-choice questions will adjust to your ability level, and your test will be unique.How does it work?For each multiple-choice section of the GMAT exam, there is a large pool of potential questionsranging from a low to high level of difficulty. Each section of the test starts with a question ofmoderate difficulty. If you answer the first question correctly, the computer will usually give you aharder question. If you answer the first question incorrectly, your next question will be easier. Thisprocess will continue until you complete the section, at which point the computer will have anaccurate assessment of your ability level in that subject area.In a computer-adaptive test, only one question at a time is presented. Because the computer scoreseach question before selecting the next one, you may not skip, return to, or change your responsesto previous questions.What If I make a mistake or guess?
    • If you answer a question incorrectly by mistake or correctly by randomly guessing, your answers tosubsequent questions will lead you back to questions that are at the appropriate level of difficultyfor you.Random guessing can significantly lower your scores. So, if you do not know the answer to aquestion, you should try to eliminate as many answer choices as possible and then select the answeryou think is best. For more testing strategies, see Test-Taking Strategies.What if I do not finish?Pacing is critical, as there is a severe penalty for not completing. Both the time and number ofquestions that remain in the section are displayed on the screen during the exam. There are 37Quantitative questions and 41 Verbal questions. If a question is too time-consuming or if you don’tknow the answer, make an educated guess by first eliminating the answers you know to be wrong.How is my score determined?Your score is determined by: • the number of questions you answer, • whether you answer the questions correctly or incorrectly, and • the level of difficulty and other statistical characteristics of each question.The questions in an adaptive test are weighted according to their difficulty and other statisticalproperties, not according to their position in the test.Are all questions counted?Every test contains trial multiple-choice questions being pretested for use in a real exam. Thesequestions are not identified and appear in different locations within the test. You should, therefore,do your best on all questions. Answers to trial questions are not counted in the scoring of your test.What Computer Skills do you Need?You need only minimal computer skills to complete the GMAT exam. Familiarize yourself with themechanics of taking a computer-adaptive test by using the GMAT Tutorials that is included with thefree GMATPrep® Software. The tutorials cover such topics as: • using a mouse • entering responses • moving on to the next question • using the word processor • accessing the Help functionBefore the day of your test, review the testing tools covered in the tutorials. Although you will beable to use a Help function during the test, the time spent doing so will count against the timeallotted for completing a test section.Analytical Writing Assessment SectionHome > The GMAT > Test Structure & Overview > Analytical Writing Assessment Section • Print • Save • Email • Share • Digg • Yahoo Buzz
    • • Technorati • Delicious • StumbleUpon • Reddit • Facebook •The Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) of the GMAT® is designed as a direct measure of your ability to think critically and to communicate your ideas. *******************************************************************************************NEW! US Citizens: Practice Your GMAT® Essay-Writing Skills and Make $30*******************************************************************************************The AWA consists of two 30-minute writing tasks—Analysis of an Issue and Analysis of anArgument.The issues and arguments presented on the test concern topics of general interest related to businessor a variety of other subjects. A specific knowledge of the essay topic is not necessary; only yourcapacity to write analytically is assessed.Analysis of an IssueFor the Analysis of an Issue section, you will need to analyze the issue presented and explain yourpoint of view on the subject. There is no correct answer. Instead, you should consider variousperspectives. Use relevant reasons or examples drawn from your experience, observations, orreading to develop your own position on the issue.What Is MeasuredThe Analysis of an Issue tests your ability to explore the complexities of an issue or opinion and, ifappropriate, to take a position that is informed by your understanding.Sample QuestionFor an example of this type of question and directions for answering, go to the Sample Analysis ofan Issue Question.Analysis of an ArgumentFor the Analysis of an Argument section, you will need to analyze the reasoning behind a givenargument and write a critique of that argument. You are not being asked to present your own viewson the subject.Consider the following when developing your essay: • What questionable assumptions underlie the thinking behind the argument? • What alternative explanations or counterexamples might weaken the conclusion? • What sort of evidence could help strengthen or refute the argument?What Is MeasuredThe Analysis of an Argument section tests your ability to formulate an appropriate and constructivecritique of a specific conclusion based on a specific line of thinking.Sample Question
    • For an example of this type of question and directions for answering, go to the Sample Analysis ofan Argument Question.Current Analytical Writing Assessment TopicsYou may download the complete list of current Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) Analysis ofan Argument Topics and Analysis of an Issue Topics used during the administration of the GMATexam.For information on the ownership of essays and scores please see Canceling Your Scores.AWA Rescoring ServiceIndependent readers will rescore your essays for a fee of US$45. The multiple-choice Quantitativeand Verbal sections of the test cannot be rescored.Requests for rescoring must be made within six (6) months of your test date. A request receivedafter six (6) months will not be honored.Rescoring ResultsRescoring may result in increases or decreases in your original AWA score. The rescoring results arefinal whether there is an increase or decrease. Revised results will be sent to you and to the graduatemanagement programs you designated as score recipients approximately 20 days after your requestis received. Once your rescoring request has been processed the fee will not be refunded.How to Request RescoringYou may request this service by sending a request to GMAT Customer Service.Contact Customer ServiceIf you have questions about the AWA or the AWA Rescoring Service, please contact GMATCustomer Service in your regioQuantitative SectionHome > The GMAT > Test Structure & Overview > Quantitative Section • Print • Save • Email • Share • Digg • Yahoo Buzz • Technorati • Delicious • StumbleUpon • Reddit • Facebook •Two types of multiple­choice questions are used in the Quantitative section of the GMAT® exam—Problem Solving and Data Sufficiency.The Quantitative section of the GMATmeasures the ability to reason quantitatively, solve
    • quantitative problems, and interpret graphic data.Problem-Solving and Data-Sufficiency questions are intermingled throughout the section. Bothtypes of questions require knowledge of: • arithmetic, • elementary algebra, and • commonly known concepts of geometry.Problem­Solving QuestionsProblem-Solving questions are designed to test: • basic mathematical skills, • understanding of elementary mathematical concepts, and • the ability to reason quantitatively and solve quantitative problems.For an example of this type of question and directions for answering, go to Sample Problem-Solving Question.Data­Sufficiency QuestionsData-Sufficiency questions are designed to measure your ability to: • analyze a quantitative problem, • recognize which information is relevant, and • determine at what point there is sufficient information to solve a problem.Data-Sufficiency questions are accompanied by some initial information and two statements,labeled (1) and (2). You must decide whether the statements given offer enough data to enable youto answer the question. You must choose one of the following answers: • Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) is not sufficient. • Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) is not sufficient. • BOTH statements TOGETHER are sufficient, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient. • EACH statement ALONE is sufficient. • Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient.For an example of this type of question and directions for answering, go to Sample Data-Sufficiency Question.Verbal SectionHome > The GMAT > Test Structure & Overview > Verbal Section • Print • Save • Email • Share • Digg • Yahoo Buzz • Technorati • Delicious • StumbleUpon • Reddit
    • • Facebook •Three types of multiple­choice questions are used in the Verbal section of the GMAT® exam—Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and Sentence Correction.The Verbal section of the GMAT exam measures your ability to: • read and comprehend written material, • reason and evaluate arguments, and • correct written material to conform to standard written English.Reading Comprehension QuestionsReading Comprehension passages are up to 350 words long. Topics contain material from the socialsciences, physical or biological sciences, and business-related areas (marketing, economics, humanresource management, etc.).Because the Reading Comprehension section of the GMAT exam includes passages from severaldifferent content areas, you may be generally familiar with some of the material; however, nospecific knowledge of the material is required. All questions are to be answered on the basis ofwhat is stated or implied in the reading material.Reading Comprehension passages are accompanied by interpretive, applied, and inferentialquestions.What Is MeasuredReading Comprehension questions measure your ability to understand, analyze, and applyinformation and concepts presented in written form.This section evaluates the following abilities: • Understanding words and statements in reading passages: Questions of this type test your understanding of and ability to comprehend terms used in the passage and your understanding of the English language. • Understanding the logical relationships between significant points and concepts in the reading passages: Questions of this type ask you to determine the strong and weak points of an argument or to evaluate the importance of arguments and ideas in a passage. • Drawing inferences from facts and statements in the reading passages: Questions of this type ask you to consider factual statements or information and, on the basis of that information, reach a general conclusion. • Understanding and following the development of quantitative concepts as they are presented in verbal material: Questions of this type involve the interpretation of numerical data or the use of simple arithmetic to reach conclusions about material in a passage.Sample Question • For an example of this type of question and directions for answering, go to Sample Reading Comprehension Question.Critical Reasoning QuestionsCritical Reasoning questions are designed to test the reasoning skills involved in making arguments,evaluating arguments, and formulating or evaluating a plan of action. Questions are based on
    • materials from a variety of sources. No familiarity with the specific subject matter is needed.What Is MeasuredThis section measures your ability to reason effectively in three areas: • Argument construction: Questions of this type may ask you to recognize the basic structure of an argument, properly drawn conclusions, underlying assumptions, well- supported explanatory hypotheses, or parallels between structurally similar arguments. • Argument evaluation: Questions of this type may ask you to analyze a given argument, recognize factors that would strengthen or weaken an argument, reasoning errors committed in making an argument, or aspects of the methods by which an argument proceeds. • Formulating and evaluating a plan of action: Questions of this type may ask you to recognize the relative appropriateness, effectiveness, or efficiency of different plans of action; factors that would strengthen or weaken a proposed plan of action; or assumptions underlying a proposed plan of action.Sample QuestionFor an example of this type of question and directions for answering, click Sample CriticalReasoning Question.Sentence Correction QuestionsSentence Correction questions ask you which of the five choices best expresses an idea orrelationship. The questions will require you to be familiar with the stylistic conventions andgrammatical rules of standard written English. You must also demonstrate your ability to improveincorrect or ineffective expressions.What Is MeasuredThis section tests two broad aspects of language proficiency: • Correct expression: A correct sentence is grammatically and structurally sound. It conforms to all the rules of standard written English, e.g., noun-verb agreement, pronoun consistency, pronoun case, and verb tense sequence. A correct sentence will not have dangling, misplaced, or improperly formed modifiers, unidiomatic or inconsistent expressions, or faults in parallel construction. • Effective expression: An effective sentence expresses an idea or relationship clearly and concisely, as well as grammatically. This does not mean that the choice with the fewest and simplest words is necessarily the best answer. It means that there are no superfluous words or needlessly complicated expressions in the best choice. In addition, an effective sentence uses proper diction—the standard dictionary meanings of words and the appropriateness of words in context. In evaluating the diction of a sentence, you must be able to recognize whether the words are well chosen, accurate, and suitable for the context.Sample QuestionFor an example of this type of question and directions for answering, click Sample SentenceCorrection QuestGMAT Test Accommodations: Myths and Realities  • Print • Save • Share • Digg • Yahoo Buzz
    • • Technorati • Delicious • StumbleUpon • Reddit • Facebook • RSSWritten on 06/30/2010 , 09:48 AM by Kendra JohnsonFor some test takers with disabilities, tests administered under standard time conditions may notaccurately reflect their abilities. GMAC provides reasonable accommodations to GMAT test takerswho have documented disabilities within the meaning of the recently amended Americans withDisabilities Act (ADA), as well as other applicable laws. In doing so, we’ve found that some testtakers have misconceptions about how these accommocations work.Here are five of the most common misconceptions about GMAT test accommodations…along withthe facts to help set the record straight.Myth #1If I receive test accommodations, my GMAT® score will be flagged.Reality: Score reports never show whether a test was taken with or without accommodations. Theschools you are applying to will not be able to identify you as a test taker with a disability.Myth #2As long as I have a diagnosed disability by a medical/psychological professional, I am eligible toreceive accommodations on the GMAT.Reality: More than a diagnosis is necessary to qualify for accommodations on the GMAT®. Youmust adequately document—1. the existence of an impairment that substantially limits a major life activity2. the current impact of your impairment and how it affects your ability to take the computeradaptive GMAT exam under standard conditions, and3. the rationale for why the requested accommodations are appropriate in light of yourimpairment(s).Myth # 3Accommodated GMAT test takers have an unfair advantage over non-accommodated test takers.Reality: According to a recent study conducted by GMAC researchers, there is no meaningful orstatistically significant differences in the distribution of GMAT scores (Total, Verbal, Quantitative,or AWA) for accommodated versus non-accommodated test takers. (This study took demographicand background characteristics into account.)Myth #4GMAT test scores achieved under accommodated conditions undermine the validity of the GMAT.Reality: Accommodations are provided on an individualized, case-by-case basis. Accommodationsthat would affect the measurement of the skills that the GMAT measures, or alter the predictivevalidity of the resulting test scores compared with scores achieved under standard conditions, arenot provided.Myth #5GMAT test accommodations are designed to ensure that test takers with disabilities receive a betterGMAT score.Reality: The purpose of an accommodation is not to facilitate your best possible score, maximizeyour learning potential, or accommodate a deliberate test-taking style. Rather, the purpose of anaccommodation is to provide a level playing field to individuals with substantial limitationscompared to their peers.For more information about GMAT test accommodations for candidates with disabilities, visit
    • mba.com Table 5 : Cut-off GATE scores adopted for admissions in the year 2009-10 Course Specialisation ST SC PD OBC GN AE-485 AE-584 Aerospace Engg. AE Aerospace Engg. XE-257 AE-206 ME-286 XE-495 ME-568 XE-536 AG-512 Farm Machinery and AG1 AG-204 AG-455 - AG-545 Power ME-526 Soil and Water AG-389 AG-415 AG2 Conservation AG-333 AG-343 - Engineering CE-413 AG-399 AG-452 AG-485 AG3 Dairy & Food Engg. AG-263 - XE-397 ME-537 AG4 Applied Botany XL-324 XL-327 - XL-466 XL-494 Agricultural and Food Water Resources AG-366 AG-406 Engg, AG5 Development and - AG-267 - Management CE-417 - AG-369 CH-434 AG6 Aquacultural - - - Engineering XE-393 CE-401 AG-206 AG-306 AG-343 Agricultural Systems AG7 - - and Management XL-237 XL-449 AG8 Post Harvest Engg. - AG-356 - AG-415 AG-452 Arch. and Regional AR-307 AR City Planning - AR-193 - AR-428 Planning Biotechnology and CH-281 XL-515 Biotechnology BT Biochemical XL-421 XL-327 XL-581 Engineering XL-442
    • Hydraulic & Water CE-421 CE1 CE-268 CE-308 - CE-437 Resources Engg. Transportation CE-510 CE2 CE-272 CE-345 CE-320 CE-558 Engineering Environmental CH-274 CE-425Civil Engg. CE3 Engineering and - - CE-445 Management CE-332 Geo-Technical CE-485 CE4 CE-365 CE-453 - CE-534 Engineering Structural CE-630 CE5 CE-300 CE-507 CE-264 CE-638 Engineering Chemical CH-383Chemical Engg. CH CH-220 CH285 CH-400 CH-437 Engineering XE-453 AE-490 Earth System MA-440 MA-448Centre for Sciences CL Science & CE-260 MA-246 - Technology PH-412 PH-442 XE-470 PH-423 EE-619 CH-274 ME-556 CryogenicCryogenic Engg. CR - - Engineering PH-323 PH-465 XE-515Computer Science and Computer Science & CS-640 CS CS-381 CS-477 CS-481 CS-707Engg. Engineering Machine Drives & EE-673 EE1 EE-446 EE-457 EE-608 EE-706 Power Electronics EE-641 EE-700 Control System EE2 EE-424 EE-435 - EC-700 EngineeringElectrical Engg. IN-700 Power System EE-641 EE3 EE-516 EE-505 - EE-673 Engineering EC-392 EE-440 IN-654 EE-684 EE4 Instrumentation EE-504 EE-467 IN-471 IN-684
    • Fibre optics & Light EC-613 EC1 EC-349 EC-420 - EC-661 wave Engineering Micro Electronics EC-673 EC2 EC-353 EC-503 EC-534 EC-744 and VLSI Design RF and Microwave EC-617Electronics and EC3 EC-345 EC-459 EC-424 EC-669 EngineeringElectrical Comm. Engg. Telecommunication EC-649 EC4 EC-380 EC-439 EC-555 EC-724 Systems Engg. Visual Information & EC-645 EC5 Embedded Systems EC-360 EC-424 - EC-696 Engg. EE-619 CS-653Centre for Educational Media and Sound ET EE-321 EE-419 -Technology Engineering IN-623 EC-645 Earth and GG-306 GG1 Environmental - GG-235 - GG-371 SciencesGeology andGeophysics PH-429 MA-513 Computational GG2 PH-211 PH-300 CS-423 Seismology MA-440 ME-545 AG-356 AG-465 CE-401 CS-682 CH-379 EC-641 EE-652 AG-222 IN-476 Human ResourcesHumanities and Social HS Development and - MT-206 CS-519 MA-509Sciences Management CY-247 ME-556 PI-485 PH-485 TF-504 XL-516Ranbir & Chitra CE-445 Infrastructure AR-477 ID Design & - AR-271 -of Infrastructure Design Management CE-445& Management
    • PI-457 AG-575 ME-545 CS-661 CE-369 Industrial EC-641Industrial Engg. and IM Engineering and - PI-373 EE-457Management Management EE-662 TF-392 ME-564 PI-575 Information CS-632Information Technology IT CS-372 CS-473 CS-448 CS-678 Technology MA-386 MA-491 EC-665 Computer Sc. andMathematics CSDP - EE-416 Data Processing PH-389 MA-521 Manufacturing ME-549 ME-575 ME1 Science and PI-277 PI-325 - Engineering PI-614 Thermal Science ME-556Mechanical Engg. ME2 - ME-450 ME-290 ME-609 and Engineering ME-347 ME-564 Mechanical ME3 ME-404 ME-460 ME-632 Systems Design. ME-446 MN-287 CH-390Mining Engg. MN Mining Engg. - MN-250 - MN-267 CH-373 CY-462 CY-313 PH-448 Materials Science &Materials Science MS - CY-299 - Engg. XE-325 XE-463 XL-518 MT-265 MT-354 XE-355 Metallurgical andMet. and Mat. Engg. MT - MT-231 MT-273 CH-423 Materials Engg. PI-513 ME-560Ocean Engg. and Naval OE Ocean Engg. & CE-240 CE-288 - AE-449 AE-531Architecture
    • CE-514 CE-626 Naval Architecture XE-529 XE-425 ME-549 EC-360 PH-462 EC-653Physics and PH2 Technology - PH-382Meteorology PH-409 PH-478 PI-377 CS-649 CH-369 EC-649Reliability Engineering RE Reliability Engg. - CH-267 - IN-392 EE-635 IN-669 ME-552 CH-373 CY-434 XE-369 PI-495Rubber Technology RT Rubber Technology - XE-213 CY-244 ME-537 TF-470 IN-428 CS-657 Medical ImagingScience & Technolog SM EC-305 IN-309 - EE-619 EC-641 and Image Analysis EE-641 AG-353 AG-415Resources WM Water Management - AG-243 - CE-385 CE-409 ME-545