CC Overview For Educators Sep 2009

768 views
736 views

Published on

Brief overview of CC and how it relates to OER production, practices, and education policy developments.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
768
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Finally, there is a “machine-readable” part to the licenses. Machine readability is a crucial aspect for any attribute about objects on the web. This is what makes it possible for Google, Yahoo, or myriad other search and social software products to identify CC-licensed content. Ideally, the licenses should be associated with the so-licensed content with a one-to-one relationship and codified within the html where the content is published. The mark-up standard that makes this all possible is also crucial for any other attributes that we might care to identify for web-based objects, and I will circle back to that since it is a key aspect of ccLearn’s work.
  • Finally, there is a “machine-readable” part to the licenses. Machine readability is a crucial aspect for any attribute about objects on the web. This is what makes it possible for Google, Yahoo, or myriad other search and social software products to identify CC-licensed content. Ideally, the licenses should be associated with the so-licensed content with a one-to-one relationship and codified within the html where the content is published. The mark-up standard that makes this all possible is also crucial for any other attributes that we might care to identify for web-based objects, and I will circle back to that since it is a key aspect of ccLearn’s work.
  • Finally, there is a “machine-readable” part to the licenses. Machine readability is a crucial aspect for any attribute about objects on the web. This is what makes it possible for Google, Yahoo, or myriad other search and social software products to identify CC-licensed content. Ideally, the licenses should be associated with the so-licensed content with a one-to-one relationship and codified within the html where the content is published. The mark-up standard that makes this all possible is also crucial for any other attributes that we might care to identify for web-based objects, and I will circle back to that since it is a key aspect of ccLearn’s work.
  • Finally, there is a “machine-readable” part to the licenses. Machine readability is a crucial aspect for any attribute about objects on the web. This is what makes it possible for Google, Yahoo, or myriad other search and social software products to identify CC-licensed content. Ideally, the licenses should be associated with the so-licensed content with a one-to-one relationship and codified within the html where the content is published. The mark-up standard that makes this all possible is also crucial for any other attributes that we might care to identify for web-based objects, and I will circle back to that since it is a key aspect of ccLearn’s work.
  • Finally, there is a “machine-readable” part to the licenses. Machine readability is a crucial aspect for any attribute about objects on the web. This is what makes it possible for Google, Yahoo, or myriad other search and social software products to identify CC-licensed content. Ideally, the licenses should be associated with the so-licensed content with a one-to-one relationship and codified within the html where the content is published. The mark-up standard that makes this all possible is also crucial for any other attributes that we might care to identify for web-based objects, and I will circle back to that since it is a key aspect of ccLearn’s work.
  • All CC licenses come in three parts. First, shown here, is the “human-readable” deed. This deed basically captures the essence of what the license says, using icons and plain language to make it as clear as possible. There are a number of interesting components to this deed, but you can see that it shows what we are allowed to do, and also shows what rights are still reserved. In this case, the only right reserved is the attribution requirement.
  • There is also a “lawyer-readable” deed, which is the actual legal text that undergirds the validity of the licenses. Several court cases involving CC, as well as an important case involving open licenses generally, have all reinforced the fact that these licenses are legally enforceable. There continues to be active debate and improvement on some of the trickier aspects of getting the licenses to work together on a global scale, but those concerns are mostly academic and do not affect the essence of the licenses themselves.
  • Finally, there is a “machine-readable” part to the licenses. Machine readability is a crucial aspect for any attribute about objects on the web. This is what makes it possible for Google, Yahoo, or myriad other search and social software products to identify CC-licensed content. Ideally, the licenses should be associated with the so-licensed content with a one-to-one relationship and codified within the html where the content is published. The mark-up standard that makes this all possible is also crucial for any other attributes that we might care to identify for web-based objects, and I will circle back to that since it is a key aspect of ccLearn’s work.
  • You can also embed licenses in XML in a few non-html products, such as Adobe pdfs, Microsoft 2007 objects, and Open Office products. And of course you can always just cut and paste the appropriate text and icons onto your document or resource. If you do the latter, you get all of the legal benefits, but a machine cannot read the legal status, so this is less desirable unless you are not publishing the works on the web.
  • You can also embed licenses in XML in a few non-html products, such as Adobe pdfs, Microsoft 2007 objects, and Open Office products. And of course you can always just cut and paste the appropriate text and icons onto your document or resource. If you do the latter, you get all of the legal benefits, but a machine cannot read the legal status, so this is less desirable unless you are not publishing the works on the web.
  • “ Quality” is not an objective construct. We have to view and consider quality through lenses that clearly specify intended outcomes, intended audiences, and realities on the ground. We are all interested in using materials with a “research proven” track record. But the barriers to acquiring the necessary data are many and draconian. We need to rethink the modes of control and protection that hamper research for the public good, and we believe that there are ways of doing this without compromising privacy and also without penalizing innovators who demonstrate negative results. Risk-taking should become part of the educational process. Too often, we think of teachers as essentially oral delivery mechanisms for “approved” content, or even worse, classroom managers who just need to ensure that the students who are actually there to learn don’t disrupt the students who are not. There is no question that there are unqualified teachers who need extensive support, but we need to be mindful of the fact that most teachers take some care to consider what they are actually doing each day in the classroom. We need to do a better job of professionalizing this fundamental aspect of being a teacher. We would never expect airline pilots to fly jet planes when they have only been trained on turboprops. Training teachers, whether new or veteran, is crucial. We have ample evidence at this point that much content creation, evaluation, use, and ongoing improvement will happen through casual and professional communities of practice, which may even include students, parents, etc. We have to be mindful of the community dynamics and the support that they may need. I believe that “authentic assessment” is one of the biggest, if not the biggest, challenge we must solve for the future of education. Educational outcomes must evolve beyond seat time, generic and standardized assessments, and other poor surrogates for assessing meaningful learning.
  • Of course this slide deck is CC licensed.
  • CC Overview For Educators Sep 2009

    1. 1. Ahrash N Bissell
    2. 2. We’re a nonprofit based in San Francisco with around 30 employees around the world. We do not offer legal advice per se. We offer free legal and technical tools that allow creators to publish and share their works on more flexible terms than standard copyright.
    3. 3. Digital technologies have revolutionized how creative works are made, distributed, and used. Original text by Creative Commons Australia
    4. 4. Everyday we use Movies Pictures Music Text b Are you ready??? by ssh http://www.flickr.com/photos/ssh/12638218/
    5. 5. <ul><li>It covers everything you want to use – textbooks, photos, music, videos, lesson plans. </li></ul><ul><li>It covers everything you want to do – copying, emailing, modifying, sharing with colleagues. </li></ul><ul><li>Even if it’s on the internet (or TV or radio) </li></ul>Original text by Creative Commons Australia C
    6. 6. CRICOS No. 00213J <ul><li>Emailing that book chapter to a friend or colleague? </li></ul><ul><li>Posting a picture/video/article onto your learning space? </li></ul><ul><li>Using a cartoon or drawing in a handout? </li></ul><ul><li>Uploading resources you found to your own web space? </li></ul><ul><li>Copying a lesson plan and posting it to a educational resource repository? </li></ul>b 1Happysnappers( is catching up slowly ) flickr.com/photos/21560098@N06/3636921327/
    7. 7. These activities are usually illegal unless you get permission*. * with some exceptions b tvol tvol http://www.flickr.com/photos/sixteenmilesofstring/2596569134/
    8. 8. <ul><li>But most people who tell you about copyright focus on restrictions </li></ul>Original text by Creative Commons Australia
    9. 9. Creative Commons licenses make copyright about opportunities .
    10. 10. Creative Commons provides tools for creators to grant permission ahead of time Original slide by Creative Commons Australia
    11. 11. These permissions include the right to copy / distribute , perform , display , build upon , and remix .
    12. 12. <ul><li>These tools are also for managing your own copyright </li></ul>Original slide by Creative Commons Australia b Tooled Flatty by flattop3 www .flickr.com/photos/flattop341/1085739925/ 41
    13. 13. So that you can collaborate and share material with anyone . ryanr flickr.com/photos/ryanr/142455033
    14. 14. So how does it work ?
    15. 15. Four License Conditions Six Licenses
    16. 19. Mark your website http://creativecommons.org
    17. 20. http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Marking Mark your works
    18. 21. Some rights reserved
    19. 23. <ul><li>Other Legal/Technical/Social Challenges </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Quality control” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Student privacy and sharing evaluative data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Professionalizing localization and improvement of resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Professional development and training </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Building community </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Authentic assessment” </li></ul></ul>
    20. 24. Getting involved with Open Educational Resources (OER)
    21. 25. Open Educational Resources (OER) are materials, tools, and media used for teaching and learning that are free from copyright restrictions or publicly licensed for anyone to use, adapt, and redistribute.
    22. 27. discovered.creativecommons.org/search
    23. 28. opened.creativecommons.org
    24. 29. learn.creativecommons.org Send comments to: ahrash@creativecommons.org Ahrash Bissell
    25. 30. Attribute to with a link to learn.creativecommons.org Creative Commons, ccLearn, the double C in a circle and the open Book in a circle are registered trademarks of Creative Commons in the United States and other countries. Third party marks and brands are the property of their respective holders.

    ×