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Introduction to Gifted for UNCW Teaching Fellows
 

Introduction to Gifted for UNCW Teaching Fellows

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  • Louisa May Alcott
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
  • Albert Einstein
  • Winston Churchill
  • 1973 Version1984 Version includes
  • 1973 Version1984Version includes
  • It is distinguishably different, and on measures of performance, it is higher or superior

Introduction to Gifted for UNCW Teaching Fellows Introduction to Gifted for UNCW Teaching Fellows Presentation Transcript

  • In Introduction to the World of the Academically & Intellectually Gifted
    Watson School of Education
    Teaching Fellows
    Angela Housand, Ph.D.
    housanda@uncw.edu
  • This person was told by an editor that she could never write anything that had popular appeal.
  • P
    Louisa May Alcott
    was told by an editor that she would never write anything popular.
    Little Women
    is considered one of the the best American children’s books of the past 200 years.
  • This person had a stormy and emotionally traumatic childhood. She was considered an odd-ball by many of her playmates. Even her family provided her with very little encouragement and support. For many years she lived in fantasy as the mistress of her alcoholic father’s household.
  • Eleanor Roosevelt
  • You must do the thing you think you cannot do.
    -Eleanor Roosevelt
  • This person was four years old before he could speak and seven before he could read: He was considered dull by both his parents and his teachers.
  • Albert Einstein
    Above average intelligence
    (Cox, 1926; Reis, 1995; Walberg et. al., 1981; Walberg & Paik, 2005)
    Image: http://streams.gandhiserve.org/images/einstein.jpg
  • P
    This man was fired by a newspaper editor because he didn’t have enough good ideas.
  • P
    Walt Disney
    This man was fired by a newspaper editor because he didn’t have enough good ideas.
  • As a child this person was hyperactive, had a speech defect, was prone to constant colds, had poor peer relationships, and frequently failed in school. It took him three years to complete the first grade. His father soon decided the boy needed more discipline and suggested military school. Before being admitted, however, he failed the entrance examination three times. A teacher once called him the naughtiest small boy in England.
  • WinstonChurchill
    Superior capacity for communication
    Well-rounded
    Broad interests
    (Reis, 1995, 1998, 2005; Van-Tassel Baska 1989; Walberg et. al., 1981; Walberg & Paik, 2005) Image: http://worldroots.com/brigitte/gifs/churchill.jpg
  • Giftedness in Context
  • Why discuss giftedness in context?
    No Universal Definition of Giftedness
    NC Department of Public Instruction
    alignment of program delivery with student identification
    Student Success
  • 3 Ring Conception of Giftedness
  • Gagné’s DMGT Model
    Differentiated Model of Giftedness and Talent
    Distinguishes between “gifts” and “talents”
    Gifts:
    General aptitudes
    Untrained natural ability
    Talents:
    Specific skills
    Learned capabilities
  • Taylor’s Multiple Talent Totem Poles
  • Multiple Talent Totem Poles (1984)
    Academic
    Productive Thinking
    Communicating
    Forecasting
    Decision Making
    Planning (Designing)
    Implementing
    Human Relations
    Discerning Opportunities
  • Sternberg’s Triarchic Theory
    Analytical Giftedness
    Synthetic Giftedness
    Creativity
    Insightfulness
    Intuition
    Ability to cope with novelty
    Practical Giftedness
    Apply first two in pragmatic situations
    Wisdom – concerns about needs and welfare of others
  • Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences
    Linguistic
    Logical-Mathematical
    Spatial
    Musical
    Bodily-kinesthetic
    Interpersonal
    Intrapersonal
    Naturalist
  • Definition
    There is no universally accepted definition for gifted, talented, or giftedness
  • U.S. D.O.E Definition
    Children and youth with outstanding talent perform or show the potential for performing at remarkably high levels of accomplishment when compared with others of their age, experience, or environment. These children and youth exhibit high performance capability in intellectual, creative, and/or artistic areas, possess an unusual leadership capacity, or excel in specific academic fields. They require services of activities not ordinarily provided by the schools. Outstanding talents are present in children and youth from all cultural groups, across all economic strata, and in all areas of human endeavor (Department of Education, 1993).
  • Article 9B
    Academically or intellectually gifted students perform or show the potential to perform at substantially high levels of accomplishment when compared with others of their age, experience, or environment. Academically or intellectually gifted students exhibit high performance capability in intellectual areas, specific academic fields, or in both intellectual areas and specific academic fields. Academically or intellectually gifted students require differentiated educational services beyond those ordinarily provided by the regular educational program. Outstanding abilities are present in students from all cultural groups, across all economic strata, and in all areas of human endeavor.
    (1996, 2nd Ex. Sess., c. 18, s. 18.24(f).)
  • Article 9B
    School districts are required to follow the North Carolina state definition:
    Guide the identification process
    Consequently determine who is selected for services
  • www.ncpublicschools.org/academicservices/gifted/
    OR
    Google: NC DPI AIG Program Standards
  • Continuum of Services
    In Class Enrichment
    Enrichment Clusters
    SchoolwideEvents
    Grade Level Events
    Differentiation/ Compacting
    Pull-out Programs
    Enrichment Clusters
    Enrichment Triad
  • Characteristics: Seeing
    Unusual alertness
    Joy in learning
    Keen observation
    Sees “Big Picture”
    Makes connections
    Intense focus
    Curious
  • Characteristics: Speed
    Early and rapid learning
    Rapid language development
    Metacognitively efficient
  • Superior ≠
  • Superior =
  • Characteristics: Differences
    Superior language
    Verbal fluency
    Large vocabulary
    Superior analytical and reasoning ability
    High-capacity memory
    Goes beyond what is sought
    Abstract, complex, and insightful thinking
  • Characteristics
  • Characteristics
    Behaviors
  • T
    I
    C
    U
    C
    A
    P
    Gifted Behaviors NOT Gifted People!
  • 3 Ring Conception of Giftedness
  • School House Giftedness
    Creative Giftedness
  • Teacher Pleaser
    Evil Genius
  • Creatively Gifted
    Independent
    High energy
    Curious
    Sense of humor
    Open-minded
    Need for privacy and alone time
  • Creatively Gifted
    Aware of their own creativeness
    Originality in thought and action
    Attracted to complexity and novelty
    Artistic tendencies
    Willing to take risks
    Perceptive
  • And the not so good…
    Impulsive
    Egotistical
    Argumentative
    Rebellious
    Uncooperative
    Stubborn
    Childish
    Absentminded
    Neurotic
    Temperamental
    Capricious
    Careless
    Disorganized
    Demanding
    Indifferent to Conventions
  • Characteristics: Negative
    Uneven mental development
    Interpersonal difficulties
    Underachievement
  • Asynchronous Development
    Uneven intellectual, physical, and emotional development.
  • Asynchronous Development
    Cognitively understand advanced concepts (like mortality) but lack emotional maturity to cope with knowledge
    Perceived as older due to cognitive ability, but lack behavioral maturity
  • Underachievers: Personality
    Low self-esteem or Low self-efficacy
    Feelings of Pessimism
    Anxious, impulsive, or inattentive
    Aggressive, hostile
    Depressed
    Socially immature
  • Internal Mediators
    Fear of failure
    Fear of success
    Negative attitude toward school
    Antisocial, rebellious
    Self-critical or perfectionistic
  • Maladaptive Strategies
    Lack goal-directed behavior
    Poor coping skills
    Poor self-regulation
    Defense mechanisms
  • Not all bad…
    • Demonstrate honesty and integrity when rejecting inappropriate school work
    • Intense outside interests
    • Creative
  • What about these characteristics?
    Inability to master certain academic skills
    Lack of motivation
    Disruptive classroom behavior
    Failure to complete assignments
    Lack of organizational skills
    Poor listening and concentration skills
    Unrealistic self-expectations
  • Twice-Exceptional
    Gifted with Learning Disability
    May also demonstrate
    Learned helplessness
    Perfectionism
    Supersensitivity
    Low self-esteem
    Behaviors may hamper identification
  • Look For:
    Advanced vocabulary use
    Exceptional analytic abilities
    High levels of creativity
    Advanced problem-solving skills
    Divergent thinking
    Specific aptitude
    Good memory
    Spatial abilities
  • They Are All So Different…
    Children come to us in a variety of shapes, sizes, intellectual abilities, creative abilities, inter/intra personal skills, and a myriad more characteristics that makes each child we deal with unique and special. Carol Ann Tomlinson
  • Diversity in students can include:
    Ability
    Achievement
    Academic background
    Cultural differences
    second language acquisition, interaction style differences
    Differences in affect
    enthusiasm level and personality
  • Diversity in students can include:
    Differences learning styles
    Differences in interests
    Differences in preferences for products and processes
    Differences in effort
    Differences in self-regulation and study skills
  • Why Aren’t Some Students Challenged?
  • Classroom Practices Study
    Teachers reported that they never had any training in meeting the needs of gifted students.
    61% public school teachers
    54% private school teachers
    Archambault, F. X., Jr., Westberg, K. L., Brown, S. W., Hallmark, B. W., Emmons, C. L., & Zhang, W. (1993). Regular classroom practices with gifted students: Results of a national survey of classroom teachers (Research Monograph 93102). Storrs, CT: The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut.
  • Classroom Practices Observational Study
    Students experienced no instructional or curricular differentiation in 84% of the activities in which they participated:
    Reading Language Arts
    Mathematics Social Studies
    Science
    Westberg, K. L., Archambault, F. X., Jr., Dobyns, S. M., & Salvin, T. J. (1993). An observational study of instructional and curricular practices used with gifted and talented students in regular classroom (Research Monograph 93104). Storrs, CT: The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut.
  • Types of Differentiation in Which Target Gifted Students Were Involved
    No Differentiation
    Advanced Content
    Advanced Process
    Advanced Product
    Indep. Study w/ Assigned Topic
    Indep. Study w/ Self-selected Topic
    Other Differentiation
  • Achievement Gap
    The observed disparity on a number of educational measures between the highest performing students and the lowest performing students
  • Achievement Gap
    Performance gaps defined by groups
    Gender,
    Race or ethnicity
    Socioeconomic status
    The disparities are clearly documented and are of substantial magnitude
  • Estimated Variability Typical 1st Grade Classroom
    DSS of 110
    Developmental standard score
    Lowest 1st grader
    DSS of 199
    Average 4th grader
    Low 9th grader
  • Estimated Variability Typical 1st Grade Classroom
    DSS of 110 to 199
    4-5 grade level difference between top performing student and lowest performing student
  • Estimated Variability Typical 5th Grade Classroom
    DSS of 140 (average 1st grader)
    DSS of 309 (top 9th grader)
    8 grade level difference between top performing student and lowest performing student
  • Typical 9th Grade Classroom
    DSS of 150 (average 1st grader)
    DSS of 369
    The gap widens by 145% between 1st grade and 9th grade
  • The Rub…
  • The Question of Equity
    Equity, the quality of being fair, is not about offering the exact same thing to every student, it is providing individuals with suitable challenges and experiences that will enable them to be successful and grow beyond where they are now or where they have been before.
  • Family Circus
  • Approximately 40-50% of traditional classroom material could be eliminated for targeted students.
    Reis, S. M., Westberg, K.L., Kulikowich, J., Caillard, F., Hébert, T., Plucker, J., Purcell, J.H., Rogers, J.B., & Smist, J.M. (1993). Why not let high ability students start school in January? The curriculum compacting study (Research Monograph 93106). Storrs, CT: The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut.
  • When teachers eliminated as much as 50% of the curriculum, no differences were found between treatment and control groups in most content areas. In fact, students whose curriculum was compacted scored higher than control group students in some areas.
    Reis, S. M., Westberg, K.L., Kulikowich, J., Caillard, F., Hébert, T., Plucker, J., Purcell, J.H., Rogers, J.B., & Smist, J.M. (1993). Why not let high ability students start school in January? The curriculum compacting study (Research Monograph 93106). Storrs, CT: The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, University of Connecticut.
  • Student Behaviors Suggesting that Compacting(a form of acceleration)May Be Necessary
  • Finishes tasks quickly
    Completes homework in class
    Appears bored during instruction time
    Brings in outside reading material
    Creates puzzles, games, or diversions in class
  • Tests scores consistently excellent
    Asks questions that indicate advanced familiarity with material
    Sought after by others for assistance
    Daydreams
  • For Students, Compacting
    Eliminates boredom resulting from unnecessary drill and practice.
    Provides challenge leading to continuous growth.
  • Bright
    Knows the Answers
    Asks the Questions
    Gifted
  • Bright
    Is Attentive
    Is Intellectually Engaged
    Gifted
  • Bright
    Has Good Ideas
    Has Original Ideas
    Gifted
  • Bright
    Absorbs Information
    Manipulates Information
    Gifted
  • Bright
    Top Student
    Beyond Her Age Peers
    Gifted
  • Bright
    Repeats 6-8 Times for Mastery
    Repeats 1-2 Times for Mastery
    Gifted
  • Bright
    Understands Ideas
    Constructs Abstractions
    Gifted
  • Bright
    Grasps the Meaning
    Draws Inferences
    Gifted
  • Bright
    Is a Technician
    Is an Inventor
    Gifted
  • Questions?
  • Imagine your future classroom… How will you differentiate to meet the needs of your highest ability students while still meeting the needs of your lowest achieving students?
    How will you advocate for the special needs of gifted students within your future school?
    Does differentiation really meet the needs of gifted students in current instructional settings? What can you do to change current practice if necessary?
  • Thank You.