Agents of Learning

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Agents of Learning

  1. 1. Agents of Learning:Independent Project to Student Success<br />Angela M. Housand<br />University of North Carolina, Wilmington<br />housanda@uncw.edu<br />EduFest 2009<br />Boise, Idaho<br />
  2. 2. housanda@uncw.edu<br />
  3. 3. Topics for a 3-daySpecial Session<br />Day 1: Student Motivation<br /> Research<br />Day 2: Learning & Teaching<br /> Agents of Learning<br />Day 3: Personal Initiative<br /> Wrap-up and Closure<br />
  4. 4. Create a classroom environment to support student engagement and responsibility in the learning process<br />Specific resources and examples for your use and adaptation<br />Digital native support to increase students’ self-regulation and organization<br />Why a 3-day special topic?<br />
  5. 5. 21st Century Skills<br />…but why?<br />
  6. 6. http://www.21stcenturyskills.org/<br />
  7. 7. Learning and Innovation Skills<br />Creativity and Innovation<br />Critical Thinking and Problem Solving<br />Communication and Collaboration<br />21st Century Skills<br />Learning and Innovation<br />
  8. 8. 21st Century Skills<br />Learning that is student driven<br />…but why?<br />
  9. 9.
  10. 10. Students<br />Parents<br />Varied Experiences<br />Teachers<br />Administrators<br />
  11. 11. 21st Century Skills<br />Learning that is student driven<br />Help students understand that success and achievement require effort<br />…but why?<br />
  12. 12. A<br /> lthough there are many possible explanations for why one could fail, effort and ability are the most likely causes that students report.<br />– Good & Brophy<br />
  13. 13. S<br />Quality of Work<br />Quality of Work<br />Ability<br />Effort<br />R2 = .66<br />R2 = .63<br />R2 = .11<br />Quality of Work<br />Quality of Work<br />Effort<br />R2 = .52<br />Ability<br />Teacher Rating of Students<br />Student Self-Rating<br />(Siegle & McCoach)<br />
  14. 14.
  15. 15. Self-efficacy<br />An individual’s personal judgment of his or her own ability to succeed.<br />
  16. 16. Self-efficacy is based on:<br />Past performance<br />Vicarious experiences<br />Verbal persuasion<br />Physiological cues<br />
  17. 17. Self-efficacy influences:<br />What activities we select<br />How much effort we put forth<br />How persistent we are in the face of difficulties<br />The difficulty of the goals we set<br />
  18. 18. Competence…<br />Feelings of competence shape a person’s willingness to actively engage and persist in different behaviors.<br />(Bandura 1986, 1997)<br />
  19. 19. Influence<br />On a clean sheet of paper, list the past five years vertically (2007, 2006…).<br />Next to each year, list the most important event that occurred in your life during that year.<br />Estimate the percentage of control or influence you had over each event.<br />
  20. 20. Significant Influence<br />When you reflect on your experience, do you find that you had more control then you thought?<br />Student’s may feel that external forces control their life.<br />Modify the exercise:<br />Last five months<br />Last five weeks<br />
  21. 21. Blocks to Feeling in Control<br />Motivated self-deception<br />Denying a state exists to reduce anxiety<br />“What, a test tomorrow? I don’t think so.”<br />Inaccurate verbalization<br />Convinced they feel something the do not<br />“I hate school!”<br />
  22. 22. Blocks to Feeling in Control<br />Accessibility difficulties<br />More processing required to form an attitude, therefore more apt to lose track of what the attitude is<br />“I used to be good at math, but the teacher is giving me a bad grade so I obviously am not good at math.”<br />
  23. 23. Student Ownership<br />Require students to own their feelings<br />“I feel angry” vs. “You made me mad”<br />Verbs instead of adjectives to describe feelings<br />“I am successful because I am smart.” vs. “I am successful because I work hard.”<br />
  24. 24. Being in the Moment<br />Can you change the past?<br />What are you doing now that is working? How can you do more of the same?<br />When you had a problem like this one before, what good solutions did you work out? Or Have you ever helped someone with a problem like this before?<br />
  25. 25. Motivation<br /> Diminished perception of competence (self-efficacy), autonomy (meaningfulness), or control (environmental perception) leads to lower motivation and a decreased willingness to pursue goals and persist in their attainment, thus limiting overall educational growth.<br />
  26. 26. Motivation<br />To be motivated means to be moved to do something<br />
  27. 27. Internalizing Motivation<br />Amotivation<br />Intrinsic Motivation<br />(Deci & Ryan, 1995; Ryan & Deci, 2000)<br />
  28. 28. Internalizing Motivation:External Regulation<br />(Deci & Ryan, 1995; Ryan & Deci, 2000)<br />
  29. 29. Internalizing Motivation:Introjection<br />(Deci & Ryan, 1995; Ryan & Deci, 2000)<br />
  30. 30. Internalizing Motivation:Identification<br />(Deci & Ryan, 1995; Ryan & Deci, 2000)<br />
  31. 31. Internalizing Motivation:Integration<br />(Deci & Ryan, 1995; Ryan & Deci, 2000)<br />
  32. 32. Internalizing Motivation<br />Amotivation<br />Intrinsic Motivation<br />(Deci & Ryan, 1995; Ryan & Deci, 2000)<br />
  33. 33. PersonallyMeaningful<br />Tied to Student’s Identity<br />Personally Interesting<br />Integral to the Student’s Vision of the future<br />Viewed as Useful<br />(Eccles & Wigfield) <br />
  34. 34.
  35. 35.
  36. 36. Autonomy<br /> The more autonomous (self-determined) a person believes their behavior to be the greater the personal satisfaction and enjoyment from engaging in that behavior.<br />
  37. 37. Students who are self-regulated learners are “metacognitively, motivationally, and behaviorally active participants in their own learning process”.<br />(Zimmerman, 1989, p. 329)<br />
  38. 38. Active engagement in the learning process produces increases in academic performance.<br />(Ablard & Lipschultz, 1998; Ames, 1984; Corno, 1986, 1989; Dweck, 1986; Schunk & Rice; 1985, 1987, 1991; Zimmerman, 1989; Zimmerman & Martinez-Pons, 1990)<br />
  39. 39. How can we, as educators, help students take personal initiative in the process of learning?<br />
  40. 40. How can we help students to be responsible for their learning?<br />
  41. 41. How can we give students the power to achieve their potential?<br />
  42. 42. Questions?<br />
  43. 43. Thank You!<br />
  44. 44. Agents of Learning:Independent Project to Student SuccessDay 2<br />Angela M. Housand<br />University of North Carolina, Wilmington<br />housanda@uncw.edu<br />EduFest 2009<br />Boise, Idaho<br />
  45. 45. Personal Initiative<br />
  46. 46. Students who are self-regulated learners are “metacognitively, motivationally, and behaviorally active participants in their own learning process”.<br />(Zimmerman, 1989, p. 329)<br />
  47. 47. Active engagement in the learning process produces increases in academic performance.<br />(Ablard & Lipschultz, 1998; Ames, 1984; Corno, 1986, 1989; Dweck, 1986; Schunk & Rice; 1985, 1987, 1991; Zimmerman, 1989; Zimmerman & Martinez-Pons, 1990)<br />
  48. 48. How can we, as educators, help students take personal initiative in the process of learning?<br />
  49. 49. How can we shift the responsibility of learning to students?<br />
  50. 50. How can we help students achieve their potential?<br />
  51. 51. Self-Regulated Learners<br />Compared with low achieving students, high achievers more frequently: <br />Set specific learning goals<br />Use a variety of learning strategies<br />Self-monitor<br />Adapt their efforts systematically<br />www.gifted.uconn.edu/siegle/selfregulation/section4.html<br />
  52. 52. Self-Regulation<br />Learners with high levels of<br />self-regulation have<br />good control over the<br />attainment of their goals.<br />
  53. 53. IndividualFactors<br />Personal Effort<br />Intrinsic Motivation<br />Goal Orientation<br />Self-efficacy<br />Age<br />Gender<br />(Blair & Razza, 2007; McWhaw & Abrami, 2001; Miles & Stine-Morrow, 2004; Zimmerman & Martinez-Pons, 1986, 1988, 1990)<br />
  54. 54. Self-Regulated Learning<br />Self-regulation of behavior<br />Control of resources and environment<br />Self-regulation of motivation and affect<br />Control of motivational beliefs<br />Self-regulation of cognition<br />Control of various cognitive strategies for learning<br />Zimmerman (1989)<br />
  55. 55. Cyclical and Ongoing<br />
  56. 56. When will I start?<br />Where will I work?<br />How will I get started?<br />What will help me?<br />What might hinder me?<br />
  57. 57. Am I accomplishing what I planned to do?<br />Am I being distracted?<br />Is this taking more time than I thought?<br />Am I in a setting where I can accomplish the most?<br />How can I encourage myself to keep working?<br />
  58. 58. Did I accomplish what I planned to do?<br />Was I distracted and how did I get back to work?<br />Did I plan enough time or did it take longer than I thought?<br />In which situation did I accomplish the most work?<br />
  59. 59. Three Categories ofSelf-Regulation Strategies<br />Personal:<br /> How a student organizes and interprets information<br />Behavioral<br /> Actions that a student takes<br />Environmental<br /> Structuring of the physical environment and seeking<br />
  60. 60. Personal SR Strategies<br />Organizing and transforming information<br />Outlining<br />Summarizing<br />Rearranging materials<br />Highlighting<br />Flashcards<br />Draw pictures, diagrams, charts<br />Webs/mapping<br />
  61. 61. Personal SR Strategies<br />Goal setting and planning<br />Sequencing, timing, and completing<br />Time management<br />Pacing<br />
  62. 62. Personal SR Strategies<br />Keeping records<br />Note-taking<br />Recording marks<br />Portfolio<br />Drafts of assignments<br />
  63. 63. Personal SR Strategies<br />Self-monitoring<br />Lists of errors made<br />Reflection logs/Journals<br />Weekly self-evaluations<br />Self-assessment checklists and inventories<br />Recording marks<br />Time-on-task analysis<br />Podcast or video<br />Discussion with teacher<br />
  64. 64. Personal SR Strategies<br />Rehearsing and memorizing<br />Mnemonic devices<br />Teaching someone else the material<br />Making sample questions<br />Visualization<br />Repetition<br />Rhyming / Rapping<br />Create Categories<br />
  65. 65. Behavioral SR Strategies<br />Self-evaluating<br />What does the teacher want me to do?<br />What do I want out of it?<br />What did I learn today?<br />What did I do well?<br />What am I confused about?<br />What do I need to get help with?<br />What do I still need to do?<br />
  66. 66. Behavioral SR Strategies<br />Self-consequating<br />Treats to motivate (Self-reinforcement)<br />Delay of gratification<br />Arranging or imagining punishment<br />
  67. 67. Environmental SR Strategies<br />Environmental structuring<br />Selecting or arranging the physical setting<br />Isolating; Eliminating or minimizing distractions<br />Short and frequent study<br />
  68. 68. Environmental SR Strategies<br />Seeking information<br />Library resources<br />Internet resources<br />Rereading records, tests, textbooks<br />Seeking assistance<br />
  69. 69. PowerfulLearning Environments<br />
  70. 70. 21st Century Learning Environments<br />Creates learning practices, human support, and physical environments that will support the teaching and learning of 21st century skill outcomes.<br />Enables students to learn in relevant, real world 21st century contexts (e.g., through project-based or other applied work).<br />
  71. 71. Environmental Influences<br />Opportunities for help seeking<br />Provision of complex tasks<br />Explicit strategy instruction<br />Choice in and control over activities<br />Student participation in evaluation<br />(Boekaerts & Corno, 2005; DeCorte, Verschaffel, & DeVen, 2001; Folkesson & Swalander, 2007; Hadwin et. al., 2001; Perry, 1998; Perry, Hutchinson, & Thauberger, 2007; Perry, Norby, & VandeKamp, 2003; Perry, Phillips, & Dowler, 2004; Turner, 1995)<br />
  72. 72. Research Tells Us…<br />When the learning environment provides:<br /> Opportunities for help-seeking from resources, peers, and teacher<br />Students Engage in Self-Regulated Learning Behaviors<br />
  73. 73.
  74. 74. Classroom Strategies<br />Suns and Clouds<br />Provide materials<br />Post-its<br />Resources (computer, access to media)<br />Opportunities to regain focus:<br />Personal timer (10 minutes)<br />Get up, get a drink, stretch<br />
  75. 75.
  76. 76. Research Tells Us…<br />When the learning environment provides:<br />Complex tasks that extend over time, allow for variation in expression style, and integrate multiple processes, both cognitive and procedural<br />Students Engage in Self-Regulated Learning Behaviors<br />
  77. 77. Complex Tasks<br /><ul><li>Students responsible for classroom
  78. 78. Cleaning / Organizing
  79. 79. Classroom set-up
  80. 80. Jobs that extend over time
  81. 81. Jobs rotate less frequently
  82. 82. Choice of jobs
  83. 83. Decision-making within job</li></li></ul><li>*** Complex Tasks ***<br /><ul><li>Give students a purpose for the task
  84. 84. During the process
  85. 85. For completion
  86. 86. Require student reflection
  87. 87. Progress
  88. 88. Process</li></li></ul><li>Classroom Opportunities for Providing Complex Tasks?<br />
  89. 89. Classroom Opportunities for Providing Complex Tasks<br />Group Projects <br />Independent Projects<br />Open-ended Questioning<br />Investigation Centers<br />Learning Contracts<br />Activity Menus<br />
  90. 90. Communication and Collaboration<br />21st Century Skills<br />Learning and Innovation<br />Collaborate with Others:<br />Exercising flexibility and willingness to be helpful in making necessary compromises to accomplish a common goal<br />Assuming shared responsibility for collaborative work<br />
  91. 91.
  92. 92. Independent & Group Projects<br />Ask the question:<br />Will you be able to stay interested in this topic for an extended period of time?<br />
  93. 93. The first requisite<br />of success is the <br />ability to apply your <br />physical and mental <br />energies to one <br />problem without <br />growing weary.<br />-Thomas Edison<br />
  94. 94. Independent & Group Projects<br />Project Ideas on the Web:<br />Google: Siegle Curriculum Compacting<br />OR<br />http://www.gifted.uconn.edu/Siegle/CurriculumCompacting/section14.html<br />
  95. 95. Independent & Group Projects<br />Planning Templates by Googling: <br />Management Plan<br />Wizard Project Maker<br />
  96. 96.
  97. 97. Timeline:<br /><ul><li>Start Date
  98. 98. Completion Date
  99. 99. Progress Report Dates</li></ul>Project Description:<br />What do you hope to find out or learn?<br />
  100. 100. Intended Project(s):<br /><ul><li>In what ways will you share your work?
  101. 101. How, when, and where will you share and communicate the results of your project with other people?</li></ul>What Format Will Your Project Take? <br />What will your product be?<br />
  102. 102. Critical Thinking and Problem Solving <br />21st Century Skills<br />Learning and Innovation<br />Solve Problems:<br />Identify and ask significant questions that clarify various points of view and lead to better solutions<br />
  103. 103. Getting Started:<br />What skills, resources and materials will I need?<br />Who is the intended audience?<br />
  104. 104. Independent & Group Projects<br />A Process of Problem Solving…<br />
  105. 105. Critical Thinking and Problem Solving <br />21st Century Skills<br />Learning and Innovation<br />Solve Problems:<br />Solve different kinds of non-familiar problems in both conventional and innovative ways <br />
  106. 106. Problem Solving<br />Is able to identify the problem<br />Different or unique approaches to a challenge<br />Does not stop with one answer<br />Thinks for self -- not swayed by opinion or answers of others<br />Identifies extraneous or missing information<br />Relates other information and experience to the problem<br />
  107. 107. You Know its Working When…<br />Most students can start to work without any reminders beyond the initial directions.<br />Verbal guidance or environmental reminders of self-regulation strategies are not needed.<br />
  108. 108. You Know its Working When…<br />The activity choices offered demonstrate responsiveness to specific student interests and varied expression styles in product development.<br />The activity choices offered include open-ended options to extend the challenge of previous activities.<br />
  109. 109. You Know its Working When…<br />Most students demonstrate visible enthusiasm and task commitment for their chosen activity.<br />The physical arrangement, organization, and access to resources in the environment enhances activity outcomes.<br />
  110. 110. PowerfulLearning and Teaching<br />
  111. 111. Open Ended Questioning: A Resource<br />
  112. 112. SEM-R Bookmarks<br />
  113. 113. Research Tells Us…<br />When the learning environment provides:<br /> Choice and volitional control over processes, timing, challenge level, and outcome or product of learning tasks<br />Students Engage in Self-Regulated Learning Behaviors<br />
  114. 114. Volitional Control<br /><ul><li>Set clear expectations in advance
  115. 115. Provide reminders
  116. 116. Bring students attention to their behavior when they lose self-regulation</li></li></ul><li>Volitional Control<br /><ul><li>Classroom structures that provide access to materials
  117. 117. Systems for recurring activities
  118. 118. Restroom / Drink
  119. 119. Library
  120. 120. Opportunities for monitoring behavior</li></li></ul><li>
  121. 121.
  122. 122.
  123. 123. Research Tells Us…<br />When the learning environment provides:<br />Opportunities for students participate in the process of evaluating their own work. <br />Students Engage in Self-Regulated Learning Behaviors<br />
  124. 124. Creativity and Innovation <br />21st Century Skills<br />Learning and Innovation<br />Think Creatively:<br />Elaborate, refine, analyze and evaluate their own ideas in order to improve and maximize creative efforts<br />
  125. 125.
  126. 126. A Teacher How-to<br />Guide learners’ self-beliefs, goal setting, and expectations<br />Help students frame information in a positive manner<br />Provide specific cues<br />
  127. 127. A Teacher How-to<br />Promote reflective dialogue<br />Modeling (e.g. think aloud)<br />Student practice<br />Group discussions<br />
  128. 128. A Teacher How-to<br />Provide corrective feedback<br />Performance standards must be clear and perceived as attainable<br />Focus feedback on the process of learning rather than on the student<br />
  129. 129. A Teacher How-to<br />Help learners link new experiences to prior learning<br />Use experiential learning activities<br />Focus on application of knowledge in broader context<br />Integrate professional examples with classroom information<br />
  130. 130. Self-Regulation<br /> The goal is to teach students a self-regulatory process to reach goals and aspirations. This involves breaking down goal attainment processes into teachable component parts.<br />
  131. 131. Questions?<br />
  132. 132. What is your personal definition of success?<br />
  133. 133. The greater danger for most of us <br />lies not in setting our aim too high <br />and falling short; <br />but in setting our aim too low, <br />and achieving our mark.<br />-Michelangelo<br />
  134. 134. Thank You!<br />
  135. 135. Agents of Learning:Independent Project to Student SuccessDay 3<br />Angela M. Housand<br />University of North Carolina, Wilmington<br />housanda@uncw.edu<br />EduFest 2009<br />Boise, Idaho<br />
  136. 136. Agents of Learning<br />
  137. 137. Writing Prompt<br />I would like to improve…<br />Some people are unhappy with…<br />I want to learn more about…<br />An idea I would like to try…<br />Something I think would really make a difference is…<br />Something I would like to change is…<br />
  138. 138. Goal Setting: Why bother?<br />Challenges students to give their efforts a preplanned direction<br />Take responsibility for the key events that give form to their experience<br />Provides opportunity for reflection<br />
  139. 139. All great achievements require time…<br />-Maya Angelou<br />
  140. 140. Not a Crystal Ball<br />There are no guarantees that <br /> goals will be achieved<br />Increases chance of success<br />Becomes a lifelong process<br />
  141. 141. Goal Attainment is not luck, it is work and it takes time.<br />
  142. 142.
  143. 143.
  144. 144.
  145. 145.
  146. 146.
  147. 147. Effective Goal Setting<br />Positive Statements<br />“Improve understanding” vs. “Don’t make mistakes”<br />Be Precise<br />Measurable: Dates, times, amounts<br />Write Goals Down<br />Gives them more “force”<br />
  148. 148. Effective Goal Setting<br />Set Priorities<br />When working with multiple goals or objectives, give each a status<br />Helps direct attention and avoid feelings of being overwhelmed<br />Keep Objectives Small<br />Objectives are incremental steps within larger goal<br />If the tasks are too large, progress is masked<br />
  149. 149. Effective Goal Setting<br />Set Performance Goals<br />Set goals that you have as much control over as possible (especially in the beginning)<br />Outcome goals are based on reward of achieving something<br />“I want to beat my best time.”<br />Necessary Skills<br />Students must have necessary skills to achieve goal to be successful<br />
  150. 150. Unrealistic Goals<br />Goals set by other people<br />May be in conflict with student values, beliefs, or desires<br />Insufficient Information<br />Need realistic understanding of what is being attempted<br />Always Expecting Best<br />Focus on raising student’s average performance and increasing consistency<br />
  151. 151. Insufficient Goals<br />Fear of Failure<br />Fear prevents risk taking<br />Failure is a positive: shows where room for improvement exists<br />Taking it “too easy”<br />Will not achieve anything of worth<br />
  152. 152. Set goals that are slightly out of your immediate grasp, but not so far that there is not hope of achieving them.<br />
  153. 153. Set goals that are slightly out of your immediate grasp, but not so far that there is not hope of achieving them.<br />Think:<br />Vygotsky & The Zone of Proximal Development<br />
  154. 154. Specific<br />Measurable<br />Attainable<br />Realistic<br />Time-bound<br />
  155. 155. Think it Through<br />What skills do I need to achieve this?<br />What information and knowledge do I need?<br />What help or assistance do I need?<br />What resources do I need?<br />What can block progress?<br />Is there a better way of doing this?<br />
  156. 156. Independent & Group Projects<br />Processes of self-regulated learning and goal setting, skills for success, are integrated to be relevant in an academic setting.<br />
  157. 157. What Kind of Goal?<br />Artistic<br />Behavior<br />Relationship<br />Physical<br />Academic<br />Educational<br />Public Service<br />
  158. 158. What Kind of Goal?<br />Artistic<br />Behavior<br />Relationship<br />Physical<br />Academic<br />Educational<br />Public Service<br />Do you want to make the world a better place?<br />
  159. 159. Staying the Course<br />Periodically review goals and modify to reflect changing priorities and experience<br />Involve others in the goal: Inform, discuss, and share<br />Engage with successful, motivated people who also set goals<br />Create a “Goals Collage”<br />
  160. 160.
  161. 161. Attainment<br />Measure and take pride in the achievement of goals<br />Demonstrates forward progress<br />Celebrate and enjoy the satisfaction of achievement<br />Set a new goal<br />
  162. 162. If goal was achieved easily, make next goal harder<br />If goal took to long to achieve, make next goal a little easier<br />If something was learned that leads to need for revision of other goals, do so<br />If skills were lacking, set goals to learn necessary skills<br />Setting a New Goal<br />
  163. 163. Critical Thinking and Problem Solving <br />21st Century Skills<br />Learning and Innovation<br />Make Judgments & Decisions:<br />Reflect critically on learning experiences and processes<br />
  164. 164. Self-Reflection & Self-Monitoring<br /><ul><li>Did I accomplish what I planned to do?
  165. 165. Was I distracted and how did I get back to work?
  166. 166. Did I plan enough time or did it take longer than I thought?
  167. 167. In which situation did I accomplish the most work?</li></li></ul><li>
  168. 168. Slife<br />
  169. 169. Critical Thinking and Problem Solving <br />21st Century Skills<br />Learning and Innovation<br />Use Systems Thinking:<br />Analyze how parts of a whole interact with each other to produce overall outcomes in complex systems<br />
  170. 170. Mindmap:<br />Problem Solving, Goal Setting, & Decision Making<br />Complete the circles with your goal and steps to achieve it. Then number the circle in the order you need to attack your goal.<br />Goal:<br />From Becoming an Achiever, Carolyn Coil, Pieces of Learning<br />
  171. 171.
  172. 172.
  173. 173. Goalforit.com<br />
  174. 174. McCoach Goals Worksheet<br />Directions:<br />Please complete all of the following sentences regarding the class that you are focusing on for this program.  There are no right or wrong answers.  Put down the first idea that comes into your head.  When you are done, give this form back to your teacher/counselor.   <br /> When I try hard in this class, it&apos;s because _________________________. <br /> I would spend more time on my schoolwork if  _________________________. <br /> If I do poorly in this class, then  ___________________________________. <br /> When I don&apos;t try hard in this class, it&apos;s because  ____________________. <br /> I would rather do ___________________ than do my work for this class. <br /> Doing well in this class will help me to  ________________________. <br /> Doing poorly in this class will keep me from  ________________________. <br /> This class is important because  ________________________________. <br /> The most interesting thing that I learned this year is _______________________. <br />The thing that I am most interested in learning more about is  ________________. <br />The most interesting thing that I learned in _______ class is _________________. <br />I feel best about myself when  _______________________________________. <br />I feel worst about myself when  _____________________________________. <br />I am most proud of  _____________________________________________. <br />I wish that I could  ______________________________________________. <br />When I grow up, I want to  ________________________________________.<br />I really value ___________________________________________________.<br />Note: The goal valuations interventions are based on the work of D. Betsy McCoach.<br />
  175. 175. Goal Setting Plan(Based on Heacox, 1991)<br />1. What is one area of your class performance that you really want to improve? (This is your long term goal. It may take you several weeks, months, or even a whole school year to improve this goal.) <br />This goal is important to me because: <br />2. What is one thing that you can do NOW to help you reach your long-term goal? (This is your short-term goal. You should be able to accomplish this goal in 2-4 weeks.) <br />3. What steps do you need to reach your short-term goal? <br />4. What things or people might keep you from reaching your goal? These are your obstacles. <br />5. What can you do to get around your obstacles? These are your solutions. <br />7. What special materials or help do you need to reach your goal? These are your resources. <br />8. How will you reward yourself when you achieve your goal? These are your incentives. <br />9. How and when will you check on your progress toward your goal? Who will help you to check on your progress? <br />Checkpoint 1 Date: ____________________________________________________ <br />Checkpoint 2 Date: ____________________________________________________   <br />    I am committed to working toward achieving my short term goal.<br />Student&apos;s signature: Today&apos;s date: <br />Witness (Teacher&apos;s) signature:<br />
  176. 176.                       <br />PROBLEM SOLVING FOR GOAL SETTING<br />AND DECISION MAKING<br />Step 1: State the problem.<br />Step 2: With at least one other person, brainstorm possible solutions to the problem. Remember, in brainstorming all ideas are accepted!<br />IDEAS<br />1.<br />2.<br />3.<br />4.<br />5.<br />6.<br />7.<br />8.<br />Step 3: Now write some positive points and some negative points about the ideas listed. In your list of ideas (above) put + for each positive idea and – for each negative idea.<br />Step 4: In the space below, write down the ideas you will try and when you will try them.<br /> IDEA TIME LINE<br />From Motivating Achievers, Carolyn Coil, Pieces of Learning<br />
  177. 177.
  178. 178.
  179. 179. Model the Behaviors You Want to See<br />Organization<br />Metacogntive Awareness<br />Goal Setting<br />Self-Reflection<br />
  180. 180. Teachers Make the Difference!<br />
  181. 181. Encourage Risk Taking<br /> Resilience<br /> Perseverance<br />(Cox, 1926; Reis, 1995, 1998, 2005; Sternberg & Lubart 1993; Van-Tassel Baska 1989; Walberg et. al., 1981; Walberg & Paik, 2005)<br />
  182. 182. Creativity and Innovation <br />21st Century Skills<br />Learning and Innovation<br />Work Creatively with Others:<br />View failure as an opportunity to learn; understand that creativity and innovation is a long-term, cyclical process of small successes and frequent mistakes<br />
  183. 183. Failure is Part of the Learning Process<br />
  184. 184. Failure is Part of the Learning ProcessThe Moment When the Magic Happens…<br />
  185. 185. P<br />Thomas Edison<br />
  186. 186. P<br />Thomas Edison<br />Teachers’ opinion: <br />“too stupid to learn.” <br />
  187. 187. P<br />Thomas Edison<br />Teachers’ opinion: <br />“too stupid to learn.” <br />Mistakes made for light bulb: 3,000<br />
  188. 188. P<br />Thomas Edison<br />Teachers’ opinion: <br />“too stupid to learn.” <br />Mistakes made for light bulb: 3,000<br />Total Lifetime Patents: <br />Priceless<br />
  189. 189. P<br />Thomas Edison<br />Teachers’ opinion: <br />“too stupid to learn.” <br />Mistakes made for light bulb: 3,000<br />Total Lifetime Patents: <br />1,093<br />
  190. 190. P<br />Thomas Edison<br />Teachers’ opinion: <br />“too stupid to learn.” <br />Mistakes made for light bulb: 3,000<br />Total Lifetime Patents: <br />Priceless<br />1,093<br />
  191. 191. Achievement results from work realizing ambition.<br />-Adam Ant<br />
  192. 192. Results-<br />High levels of task engagement<br />Increased willingness to exert effort to attain desired outcomes<br />Process of learning becomes interesting and has value for the student<br />
  193. 193. Even highly <br />self-regulated students…<br />
  194. 194. Even highly <br />self-regulated students…<br />…need support!<br />
  195. 195. Questions?<br />
  196. 196. All great achievements require time…<br />-Maya Angelou<br />
  197. 197. Thank You!<br />
  198. 198. Honor Diversity of Style<br />Help students find an organizational system the fits their “style”<br />Encourage them to develop their own systems<br />Allow trial and error: Have patience to give system ideas a fair chance<br />
  199. 199. www.gifted.uconn.edu/Siegle/<br />

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