ASBESTOS: TO BAN<br />ROSE ANN O. GARCIA<br />BS-ENTREP 2-B<br />
Early concern in the modern era on the health effects of asbestos exposure can be found in several sources. Among the earl...
ASBESTOS<br />Asbestos (from Greekἄσβεστος or asbestinon, meaning "unquenchable" or "inextinguishable")[1][2] is a set of ...
ASBESTOSAsbestos is the name given to a group of minerals that occur naturally in the environment as bundles of fibers tha...
HEALTH HAZARDS OF EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS:<br />People may be exposed to asbestos in their workplace, their communities, or t...
In 1972, the federal OSHA law included regulation of the work with asbestos and asbestos products. During the seventies di...
Amosite and crocidolite are the most hazardous of the asbestos minerals because of their long persistence in the lungs of ...
“HEALTH IS VERY IMPORTANT”<br />ROSE ANN O. GARCIA<br />BS ENTREP 2-B<br />
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  1. 1. ASBESTOS: TO BAN<br />ROSE ANN O. GARCIA<br />BS-ENTREP 2-B<br />
  2. 2. Early concern in the modern era on the health effects of asbestos exposure can be found in several sources. Among the earliest were reports in Britain. The annual reports of the Chief Inspector of Factories reported as early as 1898 that asbestos had "easily demonstrated" health risks.[44]At about the same time, what was probably the first study of mortality among asbestos workers was reported in France.[45] While the study describes the cause of death as chalicosis, a generalized pneumoconiosis, the circumstances of the employment of the fifty workers whose death prompted the study suggest that the root cause was asbestos or mixed asbestos-cotton dust exposure.<br />awareness of asbestos-related diseases can be found in the early 1900s, when London doctor H. Montague Murray conducted a post mortem exam on a young asbestos factory worker who died in 1899. Dr. Murray gave testimony on this death in connection with an industrial disease compensation hearing. The post-mortem confirmed the presence of asbestos in the lung tissue, prompting Dr. Murray to express as an expert opinion his belief that the inhalation of asbestos dust had at least contributed to, if not actually caused, the death of the worker.[46]<br />The record in the United States was similar. Early observations were largely anecdotal in nature and did not definitively link the occupation with the disease, followed by more compelling and larger studies that strengthened the association.<br />
  3. 3. ASBESTOS<br />Asbestos (from Greekἄσβεστος or asbestinon, meaning "unquenchable" or "inextinguishable")[1][2] is a set of six naturally occurring silicate minerals exploited commercially for their desirable physical properties.[2] They all have in common their asbestiform habit, long, (1:20) thin fibrous crystals. The inhalation of asbestos fibers can cause serious illnesses, including malignant lung cancer, mesothelioma (a formerly rare cancer strongly associated with exposure to amphibole asbestos), and asbestosis (a type of pneumoconiosis). Long exposure to high concentrations of asbestos fibers is more likely to cause health problems, as asbestos exists in the ambient air at low levels, which itself does not cause health problems.[3] The European Union has banned all use of asbestos[4] and extraction, manufacture and processing of asbestos products.[5]<br />Asbestos became increasingly popular among manufacturers and builders in the late 19th century because of its sound absorption, average tensile strength, and its resistance to heat, electrical and chemical damage. When asbestos is used for its resistance to fire or heat, the fibers are often mixed with cement or woven into fabric or mats. Asbestos was used in some products for its heat resistance, and in the past was used on electric oven and hotplate wiring for its electrical insulation at elevated temperature, and in buildings for its flame-retardant and insulating properties, tensile strength, flexibility, and resistance to chemicals.<br />
  4. 4. ASBESTOSAsbestos is the name given to a group of minerals that occur naturally in the environment as bundles of fibers that can be separated into thin, durable threads. These fibers are resistant to heat, fire, and chemicals and do not conduct electricity. For these reasons, asbestos has been used widely in many industries.Chemically, asbestos minerals are silicate compounds, meaning they contain atoms of silicon and oxygen in their molecular structure.Asbestos minerals are divided into two major groups: Serpentine asbestos and amphibole asbestos. Serpentine asbestos includes the mineral chrysotile, which has long, curly fibers that can be woven. Chrysotile asbestos is the form that has been used most widely in commercial applications. Amphibole asbestos includes the minerals actinolite, tremolite, anthophyllite, crocidolite, and amosite. Amphibole asbestos has straight, needle-like fibers that are more brittle than those of serpentine asbestos and are more limited in their ability to be fabricated <br />HOW IS ASBESTOS USED?<br />Asbestos has been mined and used commercially in North America since the late 1800s. Its use increased greatly during World War II (3, 4). Since then, asbestos has been used in many industries. For example, the building and construction industries have used it for strengthening cement and plastics as well as for insulation, roofing, fireproofing, and sound absorption. The shipbuilding industry has used asbestos to insulate boilers, steam pipes, and hot water pipes. The automotive industry uses asbestos in vehicle brake shoes and clutch pads. Asbestos has also been used in ceiling and floor tiles; paints, coatings, and adhesives; and plastics. In addition, asbestos has been found in vermiculite-containing garden products and some talc-containing crayons.<br />In the late 1970s, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) banned the use of asbestos in wallboard patching compounds and gas fireplaces because the asbestos fibers in these products could be released into the environment during use. In addition, manufacturers of electric hairdryers voluntarily stopped using asbestos in their products in 1979. In 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) banned all new uses of asbestos; however, uses developed before 1989 are still allowed. The EPA also established regulations that require school systems to inspect buildings for the presence of damaged asbestos and to eliminate or reduce asbestos exposure to occupants by removing the asbestos or encasing it.<br />
  5. 5. HEALTH HAZARDS OF EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS:<br />People may be exposed to asbestos in their workplace, their communities, or their homes. If products containing asbestos are disturbed, tiny asbestos fibers are released into the air. When asbestos fibers are breathed in, they may get trapped in the lungs and remain there for a long time. Over time, these fibers can accumulate and cause scarring and inflammation, which can affect breathing and lead to serious health problems <br />Asbestos exposure may also increase the risk of asbestosis (an inflammatory condition affecting the lungs that can cause shortness of breath, coughing, and permanent lung damage) and other nonmalignant lung and pleural disorders, including pleural plaques (changes in the membranes surrounding the lung), pleural thickening, and benign pleural effusions (abnormal collections of fluid between the thin layers of tissue lining the lungs and the wall of the chest cavity). Although pleural plaques are not precursors to lung cancer, evidence suggests that people with pleural disease caused by exposure to asbestos may be at increased risk for lung cancer <br />ASBESTOS-RELATED DESEASE:<br />Everyone is exposed to asbestos at some time during their life. Low levels of asbestos are present in the air, water, and soil. However, most people do not become ill from their exposure. People who become ill from asbestos are usually those who are exposed to it on a regular basis, most often in a job where they work directly with the material or through substantial environmental contact.<br />Individuals involved in the rescue, recovery, and cleanup at the site of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City are another group at risk of developing an asbestos-related disease. Because asbestos was used in the construction of the North Tower of the WTC, when the building was attacked, hundreds of tons of asbestos were released into the atmosphere. Those at greatest risk include firefighters, police officers, paramedics, construction workers, and volunteers who worked in the rubble at Ground Zero. Others at risk include residents in close proximity to the WTC towers and those who attended schools nearby. These individuals will need to be followed to determine the long-term health consequences of their exposure <br />
  6. 6. In 1972, the federal OSHA law included regulation of the work with asbestos and asbestos products. During the seventies different types of asbestos use were banned, including spray insulation on structural steel, pipe insulation and spray plaster for building interiors. Everyone was denying they used asbestos and there was widespread ignorance amongst the workers, myself included. Laboratory standards and testing equipment were crude and expensive. Today, if someone wants to know if something is asbestos there are dozens of labs in the phone book. Today, analysis is standardized and can be specific down to the molecular structure for as little as 3 hours average wage. Laboratory testing was expensive in 1979; management could look you in the eye and say, "this is not asbestos." It was hard to prove otherwise. In 1979, we did not know even if we were sick from mesothelioma or asbestosis. Many doctors made false diagnosis. <br />ASBESTOS MUST BE BAN:<br />Brave scientists like William Hueber and Irving Selikoff revealed the health disaster caused by asbestos use. But the transmission belt of knowledge did not reach into the bottom of a ship. In 1973, an oil refinery worker in Texas was granted the right to sue the asbestos manufacturers and distributors due to the fact that they did not tell him of the hazards of working with asbestos. The labels were only affixed to some materials in 1964. The worker had handled asbestos containing material prior to 1964. His attorney proved that the asbestos companies knew of the dangers of asbestos exposure decades before they warned anyone. In 1979, there were moves amongst shipyard workers for health evaluations. There were also scattered lawsuits in various state and federal courts. In 1979 there was so much exposure, so much death and disease, little compensation and truth and very little health education. In 1979 over 400,000 workers received daily exposure to air borne asbestos equivalent to breathing 10 million fibers an hour. <br />
  7. 7. Amosite and crocidolite are the most hazardous of the asbestos minerals because of their long persistence in the lungs of exposed people. Tremolite often contaminates chrysotile asbestos, thus creating an additional hazard. Chrysotile asbestos, like all other forms of asbestos, has produced tumors in animals. Mesotheliomas have been observed in people who were occupationally exposed to chrysotile, family members of the occupationally exposed, and residents who lived close to asbestos factories and mines.[28] The most common diseases associated with chronic exposure to asbestos include: asbestosis and pleural abnormalities (mesothelioma, lung cancer) [29]<br />Asbestos exposure becomes a health concern when high concentrations of asbestos fibers are inhaled over a long time period.[30] People who become ill from inhaling asbestos are often those who are exposed on a day-to-day basis in a job where they worked directly with the material. As a person's exposure to fibers increases, because of being exposed to higher concentrations of fibers and/or by being exposed for a longer time, then that person's risk of disease also increases. Disease is very unlikely to result from a single, high-level exposure, or from a short period of exposure to lower levels<br />IN HEALTH:<br />Asbestos warts: caused when the sharp fibers lodge in the skin and are overgrown causing benign callus-like growths.<br />Pleural plaques: discrete fibrous or partially calcified thickened area which can be seen on X-rays of individuals exposed to asbestos. Although pleural plaques are themselves asymptomatic, in some patients this develops into pleural thickening.<br />Diffuse pleural thickening: similar to above and can sometimes be associated with asbestosis. Usually no symptoms shown but if exposure is extensive, it can cause lung impairment<br />
  8. 8. “HEALTH IS VERY IMPORTANT”<br />ROSE ANN O. GARCIA<br />BS ENTREP 2-B<br />

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