Florida human tra_0408

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  • testtttinggg
  • In May 2001, ORR issued guidance to benefit-granting agencies State Refugee Coordinators and NGOs explaining the requirements for certification and the documentation and eligibility procedures. ORR issued additional guidance to benefit-granting agencies, State Refugee Coordinators and NGOs in January 2002.
  • In May 2001, ORR issued guidance to benefit-granting agencies State Refugee Coordinators and NGOs explaining the requirements for certification and the documentation and eligibility procedures. ORR issued additional guidance to benefit-granting agencies, State Refugee Coordinators and NGOs in January 2002.
  • Florida human tra_0408

    1. 1. <ul><li>What is human trafficking? </li></ul><ul><li>Trafficking Demographics </li></ul><ul><li>Where does it occur? </li></ul><ul><li>Source Countries & Destination States </li></ul><ul><li>What legal protections currently exist? </li></ul><ul><li>Trafficking Victims Protection Act </li></ul><ul><li>What is being done to respond? </li></ul><ul><li>Programs & Benefits </li></ul>
    2. 2. As the 21st century begins, the degrading institution of slavery continues throughout the world. . .
    3. 3. Anywhere from 700,000 to 4 million individuals, primarily women and children, are trafficked within or across national borders annually.
    4. 4. <ul><li>Every 10 minutes, a person is trafficked into the United States. </li></ul>
    5. 5. Up to 750,000 women may have been trafficked into the U.S. over the past decade. Every year, at least 20,000 people are trafficked into our country.
    6. 6. Modern Day Slavery Human Trafficking
    7. 7. What is human trafficking?
    8. 8. Sex trafficking by force, fraud, or coercion or in which the person is induced to perform such an act is under 18. force fraud coercion under 18
    9. 9. Recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for labor or services, through the use of force, fraud, or coercion for the purpose of subjection to involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bondage, or slavery.
    10. 10. Involuntary servitude Peonage Debt bondage Slavery Involuntary servitude Peonage Debt bondage Slavery
    11. 11. Forms of Trafficking
    12. 12. Trafficking can take place in a variety of labor situations
    13. 13. Sex Industry
    14. 14. Domestic Servitude
    15. 15. Peddling trinkets on streets, public transportation Begging
    16. 16. Migrant Agricultural Work
    17. 17. Factories
    18. 18. Restaurants
    19. 19. Sweatshops
    20. 20. Why do victims fall prey to the practice?
    21. 21. Political instability Militarism Civil unrest Natural disasters in homelan d
    22. 22. Promises of economic opportunities or a better life.
    23. 23. Certain social & cultural practices increase vulnerability to traffickers.
    24. 24. Fear of HIV/AIDS makes young children increasingly attractive to traffickers.
    25. 25. Methods of Recruitment & Countries of Origin
    26. 26. Fraud Trickery False promises Familiarity
    27. 27. (N. Jersey) Mexico (Maryland) Russia, Ukraine (Washington, D.C.) Thailand, Vietnam,. Malaysia, Dominican Republic, China (Connecticut) Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Thailand Mexico China, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Brazil, Costa Rica, Mexico, Russia China, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Honduras, Guatemala China, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Belarus, Latvia Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand China, India, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Mexico China, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam China, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam WA CA NV AZ TX CO IL IN KY TN GA FL NC VA PA NY OH China, Hong Kong, S. Korea, Myanmar, Taiwan, Thailand, Dominican Rep, Mexico, Czech Rep., Hungary States with Trafficking Activity
    28. 28. Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 P.L. 106-386 28 October 2000
    29. 29. Major Provisions: Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (TVPA)
    30. 30. <ul><li>To prevent trafficking by increasing economic opportunities and raising awareness. </li></ul><ul><li>To protect and assist victims of trafficking by providing federal and state benefits & services. </li></ul><ul><li>To prosecute traffickers through increased law enforcement and stiffer penalties. </li></ul>TVPA Objectives
    31. 31. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Investigation Prosecution Services Through Grantees DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES Federal & State Benefits Outreach & Public Education DEPARTMENT OF STATE International Focus Coordination of Interagency Task Force DEPARTMENT OF LABOR International Initiatives Wage & Hour Division Immigration Investigation DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
    32. 32. <ul><li>TVPA provides victims: </li></ul><ul><li>Legal Protections </li></ul><ul><li>Immigration Relief </li></ul><ul><li>Federal & State Assistance </li></ul>
    33. 33. Certification Process: <ul><li>Individual must be a victim of a severe form of trafficking, </li></ul><ul><li>Individual must be willing to assist in the investigation and prosecution of traffickers, </li></ul><ul><li>AND </li></ul><ul><li>Individual must have made a bona fide application for a T visa OR been granted continued presence by the Bureau of Citizenship & Immigration Services (formerly INS). </li></ul>
    34. 34. MINOR ELIGIBILITY - Individual has not attained 18 years of age. - ORR determines that individual is a victim of a severe form of trafficking. NOT REQUIRED - Cooperation in the investigation and prosecution of a trafficking case. - Bona fide T visa application. - Continued presence. Certification Process:
    35. 35. IMMIGRATION REMEDIES
    36. 36. Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 <ul><li>Temporary Residency in the U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>Continued Presence </li></ul><ul><li>T Visa </li></ul><ul><li>U Visa </li></ul>
    37. 37. What is it? Means by which the BCIS (formerly INS) grants temporary immigration relief to victims of severe forms of trafficking who are potential witnesses.    Who can petition BCIS for continued presence? Federal law enforcement agents only. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Immigration Relief CONTINUED PRESENCE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Immigration Relief
    38. 38. <ul><li>  Advantages </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Generally more expedient than T visa process </li></ul><ul><li>One means of obtaining ORR certification and access to public benefits </li></ul><ul><li>Provides work authorization </li></ul><ul><li>Disadvantages </li></ul><ul><li>Temporary relief </li></ul><ul><li>Does not authorize adjustment to permanent resident status </li></ul><ul><li>Valid only for such period the individual’s continued presence is deemed necessary for the prosecution of trafficking cases </li></ul>DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Immigration Relief CONTINUED PRESENCE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Immigration Relief
    39. 39. <ul><li>Comply with investigation or prosecution of traffickers (for individuals over 15). </li></ul><ul><li>Are physically present in the U.S., American Samoa, Northern Mariana Islands, or port of entry on account of trafficking. </li></ul><ul><li>Suffer extreme hardship involving unusual & severe harm if removed from the U.S. </li></ul>T Visas for Victims of Severe Forms of Trafficking who: DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Immigration Relief
    40. 40. T VISAS <ul><li>BASIC FACTS </li></ul><ul><li>Annual Cap: 5,000 visas/year </li></ul><ul><li>T Visa valid for 3 years </li></ul><ul><li>Work Authorization </li></ul><ul><li>T visa applicants/holders can file for </li></ul><ul><li>immediate family members </li></ul><ul><li>T visa recipients can adjust after 3 </li></ul><ul><li>years </li></ul><ul><li>(Regulations NOT issued yet) </li></ul>DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Immigration Relief
    41. 41. Including but not limited to :   Trafficking Rape Torture Sexual Assault Sexual Exploitation Abusive Sexual Contact Peonage Slave Trade DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Immigration Relief Criminal activity must have violated U.S. laws or occurred in the U.S., its territories, or possessions. U Visa: Specific Crimes DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Immigration Relief Involuntary Servitude Prostitution Domestic Violence Being Held Hostage Unlawful Criminal Restraint False Imprisonment   Attempt, Conspiracy, or Solicitation to commit the listed crimes
    42. 42. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Immigration Relief <ul><li>Victim must possess information concerning the crime. </li></ul><ul><li>Application must include a certification from a federal, state, or local law enforcement officer, judge, prosecutor, or BCIS stating that the victim is helping, has helped, or likely to be helpful with the investigation or prosecution of the crime. </li></ul>U Visas for crime victims who have suffered substantial physical or mental abuse: DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Immigration Relief
    43. 43. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Immigration Relief <ul><li>10,000 U visas per year (does not apply to immediate family members) </li></ul><ul><li>Valid for 3 Years </li></ul><ul><li>Provides for work authorization </li></ul><ul><li>Immediate family members (spouse and children, and parents of children) may be eligible for U visas </li></ul><ul><li>Authorizes adjustment to Legal </li></ul><ul><li>Permanent Resident status after 3 years </li></ul>U Visa: Annual Cap & Benefits DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Immigration Relief
    44. 44. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Immigration Relief <ul><li>Asylum </li></ul><ul><li>Special Immigrant Juvenile Status </li></ul><ul><li>VAWA Petitions </li></ul><ul><li>Family-Based Petitions </li></ul><ul><li>Temporary Protected Status </li></ul>Additional Avenues for Immigration Relief DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Immigration Relief
    45. 45. IMPORTANT : CONSULT WITH A QUALIFIED IMMIGRATION PRACTITIONER
    46. 46. What are the needs of victims of trafficking? <ul><li>Interpretation services </li></ul><ul><li>Crisis intervention </li></ul><ul><li>Clothing </li></ul><ul><li>Food </li></ul><ul><li>Protection </li></ul><ul><li>Legal assistance </li></ul><ul><li>Medical & dental care </li></ul><ul><li>Transportation </li></ul><ul><li>Employment </li></ul><ul><li>Mental health services </li></ul><ul><li>Substance abuse treatment </li></ul><ul><li>Childcare </li></ul><ul><li>Life skills </li></ul><ul><li>Housing (short & long-term) </li></ul><ul><li>Education </li></ul>Adapted from: Clawson, Dr. Heather, and Kevonne Small. 2 April 2003. Needs Assessment of Service Providers & Trafficking Victims. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, Caliber Associates. Findings to be published August 2003.
    47. 47. What is being done to respond?
    48. 48. <ul><li>Service for clients </li></ul><ul><li>Outreach & education </li></ul>Florida Freedom Partnership
    49. 49. <ul><li>Services offered to victims of trafficking: </li></ul><ul><li>Case management </li></ul><ul><li>Legal assistance </li></ul><ul><li>Clinical intervention </li></ul><ul><li>Safe & appropriate housing </li></ul>Florida Freedom Partnership
    50. 50. rrent as of may 2002 <ul><li>Raise Public Awareness </li></ul><ul><li>Increase awareness about trafficking in Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, St. Lucie, Collier, and Monroe Counties. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide information about the TVPA and the protections available for victims of trafficking. </li></ul><ul><li>Coordinate Response to Assist and Protect Victims of Trafficking </li></ul><ul><li>Assist with service provider & law enforcement collaboration. </li></ul><ul><li>Offer comprehensive and specialized service provision for victims of trafficking. </li></ul>Outreach & Education
    51. 51. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES Benefits Certified victims of trafficking are eligible for benefits to the same extent as refugees. Benefits
    52. 52. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES Benefits <ul><li>Federal & State Mainstream Public Benefits: </li></ul><ul><li>Medicaid </li></ul><ul><li>Temporary Assistance for Needy Families </li></ul><ul><li>Supplemental Security Income </li></ul><ul><li>Food Stamps </li></ul><ul><li>Refugee Programs & Trafficking Victim Services: </li></ul><ul><li>Refugee Cash & Medical Assistance </li></ul><ul><li>Matching Grant Program </li></ul>Benefits
    53. 53. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES Benefits <ul><li>Victims 18 years or older must be certified by the Dept. of Health & Human Service/Office of Refugee Resettlement </li></ul><ul><li>Minors get letter of eligibility </li></ul>Benefits
    54. 54. <ul><li>Accept certification or eligibility letter in lieu of immigration documents (handle with discretion). - Contact the Trafficking Verification Line (1-866-401-5510). - Serve victim of trafficking with a valid certification letter as any other individual with refugee status. - Note the certification date as date of arrival for benefits purposes. - Ensure that the victim keeps the original certification or eligibility letter. </li></ul>VOLAGS, DCF, ESL Programs, etc. Accessing Benefits:
    55. 55. The Declaration of Independence recognizes the inherent dignity and worth of all people.
    56. 56. The Declaration of Independence recognizes the inherent dignity and worth of all people.
    57. 57. It states that all men are created equal and that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights.
    58. 58. It states that all men are created equal and that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights.
    59. 59. The right to be free from slavery and involuntary servitude is among those inalienable rights.
    60. 60. The right to be free from slavery and involuntary servitude is among those inalienable rights. — TVPA Section 102 (22)
    61. 61. To report trafficking crimes or to receive information on victims’ services: 305-443-0102 [email_address]

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