The space to make
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The space to make

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The space to make The space to make Presentation Transcript

  • Image: http://wedgedetroit.com/project/mt-elliott-makerspace/ 4 June, 2014 Andrew Hiskens Manager, Learning Services The space to make: setting a context
  • P–2 Road map or treasure map? Image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Measuring_azimuth_with_a_compass.png
  • P–3 Making… Image: Kevin McDonnell CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 https://flic.kr/p/y9d8z View slide
  • P–4 …and identity Image: Kevin McDonnell CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 https://flic.kr/p/y9ewL View slide
  • P–5 Circles Image: @BenjaminHamley at the 2014 Museums Australia Conference pic.twitter.com/aKgI606UMM
  • P–6 Circles (part 2) creativity technology culture learning makerspaces
  • P–7 Creativity…
  • P–8 Martin Westwell on creativity (in the workplace) • clearly articulate the task • exemplify • motivate • maintain focus • reduce interruptions • give feedback • encourage self-evaluation
  • P–9 Martin Westwell on creativity (in the workplace) • Don’t clearly articulate the task • exemplify • motivate • maintain focus • reduce interruptions • give feedback • encourage self-evaluation
  • P–10 Martin Westwell on creativity (in the workplace) • Don’t clearly articulate the task • Don’t exemplify • motivate • maintain focus • reduce interruptions • give feedback • encourage self-evaluation
  • P–11 Martin Westwell on creativity (in the workplace) • Don’t clearly articulate the task • Don’t exemplify • Don’t motivate • maintain focus • reduce interruptions • give feedback • encourage self-evaluation
  • P–12 Martin Westwell on creativity (in the workplace) • Don’t clearly articulate the task • Don’t exemplify • Don’t motivate • Don’t maintain focus • reduce interruptions • give feedback • encourage self-evaluation
  • P–13 Martin Westwell on creativity (in the workplace) • Don’t clearly articulate the task • Don’t exemplify • Don’t motivate • Don’t maintain focus • Don’t reduce interruptions • give feedback • encourage self-evaluation
  • P–14 Martin Westwell on creativity (in the workplace) • Don’t clearly articulate the task • Don’t exemplify • Don’t motivate • Don’t maintain focus • Don’t reduce interruptions • Don’t give feedback • encourage self-evaluation
  • P–15 Martin Westwell on creativity (in the workplace) • Don’t clearly articulate the task • Don’t exemplify • Don’t motivate • Don’t maintain focus • Don’t reduce interruptions • Don’t give feedback • Don’t encourage self-evaluation
  • P–16 Learning…
  • P–17 OECD Formal learning is “always organised and structured, and has learning objectives. From the learner’s standpoint, it is always intentional...”
  • P–18 OECD Informal learning is “never organised, [it] has no set objective in terms of learning outcomes and is never intentional from the learner’s standpoint…”
  • P–19 OECD Non-formal learning is “organised and can have learning objectives…”
  • P–20 Stephen Heppell - best learning experiences • active - doing something • doing it with others • a sense of personal progress • a guide / coach / teacher • a difficult task achieved • there was an audience • a sense of "got there early" • a feel for others' progress • some passion • a little eccentricity
  • P–21 Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger - Situated Learning “communities of interest…”
  • P–22 Technology…
  • P–23 Gartner Hype Cycle Image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Gartner_Hype_Cycle.svg
  • P–24 Disruptive Innovation - Clayton Christensen Image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Disruptivetechnology.gif
  • P–25 Mark Prensky “Verbs are the skills that students need to learn, practice, and master.”
  • P–26 Mark Prensky “Nouns, on the other hand, are the tools students use to learn to do, or practice, the verbs.”
  • P–27 Culture…
  • P–28 Clay Shirky Image: http://images.barnesandnoble.com/pImages/bn-review/2010/0531/CognitiveSurplus_AF.jpg
  • P–29 Mimi Itō - three-year ethnographic investigation Image: http://mitpress.mit.edu/sites/default/files/imagecache/booklist_node/9780262518543.jpg
  • P–30 Value proposition/s…
  • P–31 Value proposition/s – public • access to technology you can't (yet) afford to buy...  managing/redressing resource scarcity is a traditional library role • learning/growing  not formal  ie informal and non-formal  cf OECD definitions  the experience of learning  metacognition • individual/social experience  community/ies of interest • 3 step process  hanging out, messing around, geeking out… • what it says about me... • what it says about us...
  • P–32 Value proposition/s – the library itself • learning/growing with its community • playing/experimenting with the role of the library • embracing change  ...and seen to be doing so
  • P–33 Value proposition/s – funder/s and stakeholders • future focussed • future skills for the community • cool - and that rubs off... • embracing change  ...and seen to be doing so
  • P–34 John Seely Brown on making “something you begin to feel in your hands as much as your mind”
  • P–35 Bibliography • Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Pr. • Christensen, C. M. (1997). The innovator's dilemma: When new technologies cause great firms to fail. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press. • Eaton, S. (2010). Formal, non-formal and informal learning: What are the differences? Literacy, languages and leadership, viewed 30 May 2014, <http://drsaraheaton.wordpress.com/2010/12/31/formal-non-formal-and- informal-learning-what-are-the-differences/> • Edutopia, John Seely Brown on Motivating Learners (Big Thinkers Series), viewed 27 May 2014, <http://www.edutopia.org/john-seely-brown- motivating-learners-video> • Hepple Net, Best Learning Experiences, viewed 30 May 2014, <http://rubble.heppell.net/archive/best_learning/> • Itō, M. (2010). Hanging out, messing around, and geeking out: Kids living and learning with new media. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press
  • P–36 Bibliography • OECD. (n.d.), Recognition of non-formal and informal learning, OECD, viewed 30 May 2014, <http://www.oecd.org/edu/skills-beyond- school/recognitionofnon-formalandinformallearning-home.htm> • Mark Prensky, Verbs and Nouns, viewed 27 May 2014, <http://marcprensky.com/verbs-and-nouns/> • Shirky, C. (2010). Cognitive surplus: Creativity and generosity in a connected age. New York: Penguin Press. • Westwell, M, Creativity - presentation given at education.au conference, no longer published online, but a copy is available at <https://www.evernote.com/shard/s4/sh/814fd8d0-5273-4ec2-bb41- bf7f922ca8cf/8051f39414930562b2e05a50dc9b5b70> • Wikipedia, Hype Cycle, viewed 30 May 2014, <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hype_cycle>