0
Realizing Creativity
The eureka moment and beyond
A feature prepared by
Creativity can be expressed in many different ways. In art
and design creativity is at the heart of activities. In busines...
To shed some light on the issues, we have the
great pleasure to share a recent conversation
about creativity in business o...
Creativity is often seen as a characteristic of individuals, i.e. something
happening in the minds or brains of creative p...
Certainly. It's important to remember that an idea is not a solution but a step
towards one. Thoughts and ideas of course ...
OK, but given that many large organizations use investment models that
actually discriminate against innovation, how shoul...
In big companies this can be a bit challenging. Innovation needs to be on the
business agenda and there needs to be a way ...
That sounds encouraging. In what ways then can organizations increase the
return on their creative effort and have you in ...
I just mentioned some things companies need to do and what some have done. It's
also important to have good ways of screen...
You have stated that creativity is not only a state of mind but also a craft
involving different techniques. Can you elabo...
In our own work with clients we try to introduce thinking methods that pave the
way for creative insight. One approach inv...
We also sometimes use idea cards or mind mapping. We use Mindjet's
MindManager tool to assist teams with idea management. ...
Pablo Picasso once described his way of working as "I start with an idea and then it
turns into something else". It seems ...
Yes. I believe the creative processes are basically very similar. Bringing in people
from the creative fields can obviousl...
Yes. I believe the creative processes are basically very similar. Bringing in people
from the creative fields can obviousl...
This interview was originally featured in the June 2013 issue
of the Brainovation® newsletter.
This and other Brainovation...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Realizing creativity

139

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
139
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Realizing creativity"

  1. 1. Realizing Creativity The eureka moment and beyond A feature prepared by
  2. 2. Creativity can be expressed in many different ways. In art and design creativity is at the heart of activities. In business it is a key ingredient in innovation and in complex problem solving. Research has shown that creative contributions primarily rely on expertise, thinking skills and motivation - factors that one would expect to be present in most organizations. It should therefore be relatively easy for businesses to put creativity to work or simply enjoy its benefits, but experience suggests otherwise.
  3. 3. To shed some light on the issues, we have the great pleasure to share a recent conversation about creativity in business organizations with Mr. Thomas Hagbard, owner and CEO of Gothenburg based consulting firm Realize..
  4. 4. Creativity is often seen as a characteristic of individuals, i.e. something happening in the minds or brains of creative people. In your view, can one also look at creativity as a team characteristic or as a social phenomenon in organizations? Anders Hemre Thomas Hagbard
  5. 5. Certainly. It's important to remember that an idea is not a solution but a step towards one. Thoughts and ideas of course occur in the minds of individuals. In a team environment, members stimulate each other and people interactions are absolutely necessary to challenge, further develop and validate new ideas. But for team sessions to be productive it's important that members agree to some basic rules or establish a contract of behaviour if you will. Think "yes, and..." as the initial response to an idea. That way you level the playing field and create room for those unconventional views that are so important for innovation to happen.
  6. 6. OK, but given that many large organizations use investment models that actually discriminate against innovation, how should one promote creativity and ensure that the creative effort results in outcomes that are beneficial to the business?
  7. 7. In big companies this can be a bit challenging. Innovation needs to be on the business agenda and there needs to be a way of working with creativity. And don't forget to engage stakeholders early in the process to build awareness and support. To be successful, it's not enough to have creative people in the organization or even have a top leader who promotes innovation. There also needs to be a deliberate and organized effort to stimulate and exploit the creativity of individuals. A good example is the Clay Street project at Procter & Gamble. The widely inclusive innovation jams that have been conducted at several companies such as e.g. IBM and Volvo are also ways of tapping into the creative potential. This may not be for everybody, but there are some ways that almost everyone can benefit from.
  8. 8. That sounds encouraging. In what ways then can organizations increase the return on their creative effort and have you in your work with clients seen a strong correlation between creativity and certain business outcomes?
  9. 9. I just mentioned some things companies need to do and what some have done. It's also important to have good ways of screening and reviewing ideas to maximize the potential business value of innovation. I have certainly seen cases where creative efforts have resulted in new and profitable solutions and there are numerous positive cases reported in studies. This is not surprising. The problem is that many companies don't really track this very well as their accounting systems are not set up to do so. It can therefore be difficult to validate creative success by numbers. In addition, market success may be the result of many factors other than pure creativity. In general though, I would argue that creative effort - even if many innovations fail - overall results in a positive business outcome.
  10. 10. You have stated that creativity is not only a state of mind but also a craft involving different techniques. Can you elaborate a bit?
  11. 11. In our own work with clients we try to introduce thinking methods that pave the way for creative insight. One approach involves removing or adding something to a current product or business model, which then forces people to think along new lines. Another is to reframe a problem or bring an entirely new perspective to bear on a business issue.
  12. 12. We also sometimes use idea cards or mind mapping. We use Mindjet's MindManager tool to assist teams with idea management. In particular we find the tool's 2x2 matrices useful to visualize the positioning of ideas. Another important issue is for organizations to keep comprehensive records of their ideas. After all, it can take quite some time before technologies or markets have developed enough to justify the pursuit of a solution.
  13. 13. Pablo Picasso once described his way of working as "I start with an idea and then it turns into something else". It seems to suggest something basic about the creative process. Do you think business organizations can learn something useful about creativity and creative work from the fields of art or design?
  14. 14. Yes. I believe the creative processes are basically very similar. Bringing in people from the creative fields can obviously be very stimulating in work sessions. Besides, you don't really have to be very knowledgeable about the client's specific products or services in order to ask probing questions. In fact, it's often the novice who asks the simple question that can lead to a creative breakthrough. Overall, I think that in today's complex and fast changing business environments it may not be possible to manage effectively just by way of traditional plans and processes. It may be better to explore, probe and sense in much the same way an artist goes about creating.
  15. 15. Yes. I believe the creative processes are basically very similar. Bringing in people from the creative fields can obviously be very stimulating in work sessions. Besides, you don't really have to be very knowledgeable about the client's specific products or services in order to ask probing questions. In fact, it's often the novice who asks the simple question that can lead to a creative breakthrough. Overall, I think that in today's complex and fast changing business environments it may not be possible to manage effectively just by way of traditional plans and processes. It may be better to explore, probe and sense in much the same way an artist goes about creating. That's great food for thought. Thank you for taking the time to share your insights..
  16. 16. This interview was originally featured in the June 2013 issue of the Brainovation® newsletter. This and other Brainovation® interviews can be downloaded from www.interknowledgetech.com/Brainovation_interviews.pdf interKnowledge Technologies July 2013
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×