Horror Readers’ Advisory August 18 th , 2004 and September 9 th , 2004  Your hosts:  David “Dr. Evil” Lockwood-Lass and Am...
Alighiere Dante (1265-1321) writes “The Divine Comedy”, 1307-1321.
Vlad III, Prince of Wallachia, 1430 or 31-1476 or 7  a.k.a.  Vlad the Impaler and/or Dracula
“ Garden of Earthly Delights” by Hieronymous Bosch (c.1450-1516), c. 1504
Exterior of “Garden”(triptych folded shut)  and detail from right panel (c. 1504)
Central panel from “Garden of Earthly Delights” (c.1504)
Detail from right panel of “Garden”
Salem witchcraft trials,  17th century
Inspired by a dream, Walpole writes “The Castle of Otranto” in 1765.
Mary Shelley “Frankenstein” 1818
Edgar Allan Poe, 1809-1849
Hans Christian Andersen, 1805-1875
Robert Louis Stevenson writes “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde”, 1886
Jack the Ripper leaves a gruesome trail, 1888
Bram Stoker writes “Dracula”, 1897
Gaston Leroux writes “The Phantom of the Opera”, 1910
“ The Mummy” premieres, 1932
Charles Addams, cartoonist 1912-1988
Orson Welles scares the pants off America with his “War of the Worlds” broadcast, October 30, 1938
The 1950’s:  Post-war paranoia and B-movies
The 1960’s:  Hitchcock, Roger Corman, Hammer Films
Horror films and books of the 1970’s and 1980’s: REALITY BITES
1980s & 1990s Humor enters the picture. Trapped in time,  surrounded by evil,  low on gas.
<ul><li>Psychological horror   </li></ul><ul><li>Thomas Harris </li></ul><ul><li>Peter Straub </li></ul><ul><li>Stephen Ki...
<ul><li>Why horror? </li></ul><ul><li>Importance of genre knowledge – you don’t have to like it, but you do have to be fam...
<ul><li>Why horror? </li></ul><ul><li>General appeal factors to readers of horror: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provokes “safe” t...
Check Boundaries: Important to ask horror readers how they feel about violence, gore and sex in their stories.  Horror run...
DO NOT LET PEOPLE WALK AWAY WITH ONE BOOK!  EVER! Refer to web page and bookmark RA tools.  Even when you’re busy, they ca...
<ul><li>Marketing your horror collection: </li></ul><ul><li>Use the month of October for easy marketing to your patrons.  ...
Horror for people who don’t like horror: Ray Bradbury  Something Wicked This Way Comes   Daphne DuMaurier  Rebecca Shirley...
<ul><li>Vampire fiction: </li></ul><ul><li>Appeal factors: romance, suspense, intrigue,  </li></ul><ul><li>Current trend t...
Dark Fantasy/SF “ The New Weird” Neil Gaiman China Mieville David Weber
Horror for Teens <ul><li>V.C. Andrews -- Horror or just Horrible? </li></ul><ul><li>Classic authors and ghost stories </li...
The End. . . . . . or IS it?
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Horror Reader's Advisory

  1. 1. Horror Readers’ Advisory August 18 th , 2004 and September 9 th , 2004 Your hosts: David “Dr. Evil” Lockwood-Lass and Amy “Vampira” Hartman
  2. 2. Alighiere Dante (1265-1321) writes “The Divine Comedy”, 1307-1321.
  3. 3. Vlad III, Prince of Wallachia, 1430 or 31-1476 or 7 a.k.a. Vlad the Impaler and/or Dracula
  4. 4. “ Garden of Earthly Delights” by Hieronymous Bosch (c.1450-1516), c. 1504
  5. 5. Exterior of “Garden”(triptych folded shut) and detail from right panel (c. 1504)
  6. 6. Central panel from “Garden of Earthly Delights” (c.1504)
  7. 7. Detail from right panel of “Garden”
  8. 8. Salem witchcraft trials, 17th century
  9. 9. Inspired by a dream, Walpole writes “The Castle of Otranto” in 1765.
  10. 10. Mary Shelley “Frankenstein” 1818
  11. 11. Edgar Allan Poe, 1809-1849
  12. 12. Hans Christian Andersen, 1805-1875
  13. 13. Robert Louis Stevenson writes “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde”, 1886
  14. 14. Jack the Ripper leaves a gruesome trail, 1888
  15. 15. Bram Stoker writes “Dracula”, 1897
  16. 16. Gaston Leroux writes “The Phantom of the Opera”, 1910
  17. 17. “ The Mummy” premieres, 1932
  18. 18. Charles Addams, cartoonist 1912-1988
  19. 19. Orson Welles scares the pants off America with his “War of the Worlds” broadcast, October 30, 1938
  20. 20. The 1950’s: Post-war paranoia and B-movies
  21. 21. The 1960’s: Hitchcock, Roger Corman, Hammer Films
  22. 22. Horror films and books of the 1970’s and 1980’s: REALITY BITES
  23. 23. 1980s & 1990s Humor enters the picture. Trapped in time, surrounded by evil, low on gas.
  24. 24. <ul><li>Psychological horror </li></ul><ul><li>Thomas Harris </li></ul><ul><li>Peter Straub </li></ul><ul><li>Stephen King </li></ul>
  25. 25. <ul><li>Why horror? </li></ul><ul><li>Importance of genre knowledge – you don’t have to like it, but you do have to be familiar with it. </li></ul><ul><li>A good horror novel: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Frightens us but keeps us from hiding under the bed by coaxing us to continue reading. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Focuses on the dark side of human nature. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is a safe way to acknowledge the wickedness within our own psyches and take a small peek into this illicit world. </li></ul></ul>
  26. 26. <ul><li>Why horror? </li></ul><ul><li>General appeal factors to readers of horror: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provokes “safe” terror -- roller coaster effect atmosphere more important than plot </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Allows safe exploration of the dark side of humanity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gives readers a place where they can face their own fears </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Provides an escape from the horrors of real life </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Validates belief in the supernatural </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Many similarities with fantasy fiction – attracts similar readers </li></ul>
  27. 27. Check Boundaries: Important to ask horror readers how they feel about violence, gore and sex in their stories. Horror runs the gamut from extremely tame to the deliberate gross-out. Also check for a particular sub-genre the patron may enjoy, such as vampire fiction or ghost stories, etc.
  28. 28. DO NOT LET PEOPLE WALK AWAY WITH ONE BOOK! EVER! Refer to web page and bookmark RA tools. Even when you’re busy, they can guide patrons. Keep a display of current genre and by-the-numbers bookmarks handy for both staff and patrons. (preferably near to where the books are located and at the Reference Desk).
  29. 29. <ul><li>Marketing your horror collection: </li></ul><ul><li>Use the month of October for easy marketing to your patrons. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep a read-alike bookmark handy for patrons who ask for Stephen King, Dean Koontz and Anne Rice </li></ul><ul><li>Make suggestions when placing reserves on the hot new titles for these authors. </li></ul><ul><li>Another idea is to do a display to coincide with the opening of a popular horror movie. </li></ul>
  30. 30. Horror for people who don’t like horror: Ray Bradbury Something Wicked This Way Comes Daphne DuMaurier Rebecca Shirley Jackson The Haunting of Hill House Edgar Allan Poe Tom Tryon Harvest Home Oscar Wilde Picture of Dorian Gray see also Ghost Stories authors list
  31. 31. <ul><li>Vampire fiction: </li></ul><ul><li>Appeal factors: romance, suspense, intrigue, </li></ul><ul><li>Current trend towards glamorous and “good vampires”. </li></ul><ul><li>Popular authors on back of Horror bookmark. </li></ul>
  32. 32. Dark Fantasy/SF “ The New Weird” Neil Gaiman China Mieville David Weber
  33. 33. Horror for Teens <ul><li>V.C. Andrews -- Horror or just Horrible? </li></ul><ul><li>Classic authors and ghost stories </li></ul><ul><li>See ALA “Teen Read Week” site and Mary Plews’ recommendations, both on handout. </li></ul>
  34. 34. The End. . . . . . or IS it?

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