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Writing Effective Feedback

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The Importance Of Writing Effective Feedback For Your Employee

The Importance Of Writing Effective Feedback For Your Employee

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  • Do: Start out with high energy. Remember, the first 2 minutes of the workshop set the tone.
    Say: I am very excited to be working with you today for a couple of reasons. First and foremost, I believe you play one of the most important roles in the organization.
    -you are the link between field and upper management; you must translate down and feed up.
    -you are responsible for managing a significant amount of business.
    -You are coaching the future leaders of the company.
    Most importantly today, we are going to take the coaching skills that we learned in April and build on them. In particular we are going to focus on how to translate the verbal coaching conversation into the FCR written document.
    Do: Share a personal reason why you are excited ― why and how the topic and content touches you or is important from your perspective. For example, a personal story from your past. If you can leverage something about your background that is relevant, this will often help you bond with the group. (My personal story is starting out as the “red pen” manager and taking a sales team from bottom 20% to bottom 10%. This gets laughs and allows me to be real and start the session with “What do you think I mean by red pen?”
    Do: Share your background – and importantly how it relates to the topic.
    Bridge: We also have the support of senior management to continue our mastery of coaching skills.
    Prework: Bring two consecutive FCRs from one person in your district.
    Bring additional FCRs from two other individuals in your district.
    Materials: Participant Workbooks
    Teach-back slides to be hung on wall
    2 blank FCRs per person
    2007 VELOCITY. All Rights Reserved.
    No part of this booklet, or the seminar of which it is part, may be
    reproduced in any form or by any means without permission in
    writing from VELOCITY. 1-908-431-9681. For internal distribution and use only.
  • Do: Review the quotes from senior leadership.
    Say: Novo Nordisk has invested in the managers to gain a competitive advantage. Be proud of your leadership’s commitment. Add your support to the importance of the first-line manager.
    Bridge: The outcomes today consist of the following.
  • Do: Quickly point out the idea of this being a very realistic application workshop to help them to get the most out of their field contacts.
    Bridge: The following is our agenda.
  • Do: Review agenda.
  • Note: Slides 7 through 14 are optional, depending on how well you think the group has understood the information during the teach back activity. If you use them, note that this is a 15-minute quick overview of the slides.
    You might be better served to ask for someone to give you a quick overview of the information on each slide and the “So what?” behind it rather than teach it.
    Do: Review each of the 4 quadrants giving a brief overview. (advance slide)
    Say: Coaching is a conversation! And the nature of the 4 quadrants reminds us that this is an ongoing process.
    Do:
    Ask the group for an example of something they coach in the field.
    Draw and label 4 quads on a flip chart and write the skill in the success box. Then get more specific info on “what good looks like.”
    Then move to situation, source, solution giving an example of what it might look like in each quadrant.
    When you have filled them all in, do a very succinct self role play to show participants how we go around the model in a coaching conversation.
    Bridge: There are however two rules with this model.
  • Note: Optional slide. You might be better served to ask for someone to give you a quick overview of the information on the slide and the “So what?” behind it.
    Say: Rule #1 is to start on top first. This gives context and clarity to what is happening and to where you want to go.
    (advance slide)
    Then go below.
    Say: Rule #2 (advance slide) As mentioned, invest 80% of your time and energy on success and solution.
    Note: If you want to reinforce any of this with the poster in the front of the room, you can point to it as well.
    Bridge: We are going to use your examples to review some specifics for each of the 4 quads, but first, let’s review what we call typical coaching
  • Note: Optional slide. You might be better served to ask for someone to give you a quick overview of the information on the slide and the “So what?” behind it.
    Note: This is an important slide. Participants should be able to see that the typical coaching done in organizations is SituationSolution, where the managers drive the process, are in control, and have their own agendas.
    Be careful not to say that this is bad as this could cause defensiveness in the room. People are going to see themselves here. Simply state that it has consequences.
    Do: As you click through the bullets for Situation, spend some time embellishing each point. You can get a little theatrical here to make the point. Ask questions such as, “Have you seen this?” or “Is this what you see happening?” or “How often is this the pattern?”
    Just prior to the arrow leading to Solution, ask the group, “Where do most managers go from here?” (advance slide) Then build the slide to Solution.
    Again, elaborate on each point for Solution and get some interaction with questions such as, “How do managers do this?” Say, “We managers have a bias for action.”
    Ask: “Why is this?” “Have you ever done this?” to encourage self-reflection. (You can poke fun at them by smiling as you say this, turning your head as if to say, “I know you do it; we all do it; and this is a pattern we need to look at.”)
    Get some very brief interaction by opening the conversation, “So, what is the impact or the result of the SituationSolution strategy?“ (Get one or two comments and bridge to next slide.)
    Bridge: Let’s review the first thing you do in a coaching conversation, set the stage.
  • Note: Optional slide. You might be better served to ask for someone to give you a quick overview of the information on the slide and the “So what?” behind it.
    Say: When beginning a coaching conversation, it is best to “set the stage” to help the employee understand what your intention is - to help them get better results faster.
    Ask: Who can set the stage for a coaching conversation that is a follow-up to the an action plan you put together to build the skill of Accelerating Closure?
    Bridge: After you set the stage it is time to clarify success.
  • Note: Optional slide. You might be better served to ask for someone to give you a quick overview of the information on the slide and the “So what?” behind it.
    Say: Success has three parts to it.
    Do: Review each of the three questions and make the following points:
    What? It is important to select an area of focus for your coaching. Generally, this is a skill that would provide the greatest value in helping the employee improve performance.
    Why? One of the greatest motivators is connecting what you are doing to a relevant outcome: this is “what” we want to do as part of “why.”
    What? Clarity is power. It is not enough just to know the area of focus, we need to get super clear on what it looks like and what would have to happen to achieve success.
    Say: So, let's all say the three W’s together: What, Why, What. Ready, how do you clarify success? Together now…WHAT, WHY, WHAT. Exactly.
    Bridge: This leads to the current situation
  • Note: Optional slide. You might be better served to ask for someone to give you a quick overview of the information on the slide and the “So what?” behind it.
    Do: Review the slide bullets and reinforce the point that situation is best discussed in contrast to success.
    Ask: Have you ever done a gap analysis? This type of thinking allows you to see the answer. The trick is to not get bogged down in the situation.
    Bridge: Now let’s talk source.
  • Note: Optional slide. You might be better served to ask for someone to give you a quick overview of the information on the slide and the “So what?” behind it.
    Say: We must address the issue at its level and type of source.
    Do: Go to the flip chart and write, “Not closing.”
    Ask: What might be the source or cause of a representative not closing? (Get 4 or 5
    responses. Write them down.)
    Do:
    Advance slide to show Focus, Skill, Territory and explain each.
    Go back to the flip chart and ask the group to identify whether each item is a Focus, Skill, or Territory issue.
    Say:
    Focus coaching options might include:
    Identify a success from the past. Relate that journey to the present.
    Steps to success: Make it easy to take action and get positive results in the solution quadrant. In essence you sometimes must “lower the barriers to raise the bar.”
    When you introduce a new skill or task, there is often a period where performance dips
    until the person develops expertise.
    Skills coaching strategy: Use the 4S process and teaching skills model to teach and
    coach the skill.
    The last source is Territory. Coaching with this type of source should be to help clarify
    what is and is not in the control or influence of the employee. Steer them to what they can
    control.
    Bridge: The last step on our journey is the solution.
  • Note: Optional slide. You might be better served to ask for someone to give you a quick overview of the information on the slide and the “So what?” behind it.
    Do: Review the STP then reinforce the following:
    Say:
    The solution should address both the specific source and be directly pointed at the solution.
    The solution can have several steps, as discussed earlier. So, if it is an involved challenge or stretch goal, it might be useful to break the solution into bite sized pieces.
    Once you have developed a plan you must test it. If you do X, will it help you achieve Y? There are three answers to this question: “Yes,” “No,” and “Maybe,” and “Maybe” means no.
    Bridge: We have reviewed the strategic verbal conversation of Coaching for Success. How does this relate to Writing for Success? After a break, we will make that link.
  • Say: This is a practice simulation with one of your real world cases. Get together with a partner you don’t normally work with. Decide who will be the manager first and who will play the employee.
    Do:
    Review the directions on the slide.
    Let the BRD playing the TM know they should make it realistic and share some specifics on the challenges they are having with the skill or objective. Tell the “rep” they should give some thought before the simulation as to what is the source of their challenge.
    Reinforce that after they are complete, they should review the observer’s checklist in the workbook and identify two key learning points from their role play to share with the group.
    Debrief the first role play: What did you learn? What was hard? What went well regarding the 4S’s What might you add to what happened?
    Conduct and debrief the second role play.
    Bridge: Now that we have reviewed and practiced coaching using 4S, we will turn our attention to the FCR.
  • Say: Now that we have reviewed our key concepts, let’s discuss how to transition these verbal discussions to written documentation via a FCR. Let’s learn to write for success!
  • Say: We’ll use our own process to begin and that is to clarify what we as a leadership team feel success is from an FCR perspective.
  • Do: Give participants the following instructions:
    In your teams, you will have 15 minutes to review this audit and identify what it points to as the current situation. (Read the Situation box on this slide)
    You will then have 15 minutes to discuss and flip chart the situation, source, and recommended solutions and be prepared to present.
    After 30 minutes, take 15 minutes to review each group’s chart. Align on action steps in the solution box.
    Bridge: Now let’s move from the Audit to our own FCRs that we brought to the workshop.
  • Do:
    Review the exercise.
    Ask each person to get together with a partner from another table.
    Allow 10 minutes for the exercise.
    Debrief as a group, asking for volunteers to share what they learned.
    Hand out blank FCRs.
    Bridge: Let’s look at the basic structure of the FCR and how this relates to the purpose of the FCR we discussed earlier.
  • Say:
    There are two types of strategic coaching on your FCR form: Skills and Business Management. (Share the key differences between the two.)
    (advance slide) Skills should never be coached in a vacuum, they are always “in service of” something else, such as performance sales results.
    (advance slide) Business Management is the same, these items are in service of sales results or some higher objective.
    (advance slide) Often skills are in service of business objectives such as FEIBA switches, which are in service of results.
    (advance slide) The Training and Development Plan is in service of skill development, which again is in service of sales results. And Objectives and Action Plan is in service of Business Management objectives which is also in service of results.
    Ask: So what is the point of this slide do you think?
    Answer: If we can be effective with feedback on skills and business management and have a clear plan of action for training and objectives we are more likely to get performance/sales results.
    Bridge: The FCR is the tool to help us drive behavior change in the field. We are going to practice some writing in a minute. At this time we will review some basics on roles and responsibilities, and do’s and don’ts of performance management.
  • Explain: A lot of companies make the mistake of focusing too much on the review form and the administrative process, and too little on the quality of the conversation that leads into the written FCR. The review is one of the most important conversations between an employee and manager.
    Ask: Think back to your experience in having your own performance reviewed. I invite you to share some true stories.
    With the group at your table, ask one volunteer to describe a time when they received a poorly prepared and delivered review.
    Then have a second volunteer describe a time when they received a well-prepared and delivered review. In both cases, explain how the review impacted the person and his/her work.
    Debrief: Ask for the impact of poorly prepared and delivered, then well-prepared and delivered reviews and how this relates to the FCR.
    Bridge: What are some of the manager’s roles during a review. Let’s see.
  • Explain: Good performance management is a collaborative process. (Refer to the slide, discussing each point briefly).
    Say: The degree to which we do these things ensures that there are no surprises at review time, and it saves time in that the review is just a summary of conversations you’ve already been having.
    Ask for examples from the audience.
    Bridge: What are some of the employee’s roles?
  • Debrief: Based on your experience, what is the employee’s role in collaborative performance management? Review slide to summarize.
    Ask: Think again about your own experience. What could your manager do to encourage your collaboration? Set standards and expectations for reporting and communicating results; demonstrate a collaborative leadership style; ask for input; etc.
    Bridge: There are a few legal tips that are helpful.
  • Ask: Can someone give me examples from one or two of the above examples?
    Bridge: Managers also have to avoid some important legal pitfalls in managing performance.
  • Explain: Just as important are things managers must not do:
    Assume a verbal warning can remain out of an employee’s file. Company specific!
    Simply state that employee’s performance is “unacceptable”
    Show a sudden decline in performance without documentation
    Back date reviews or postpone them
    Focus on personality or lifestyle
    Allow reviews to go unsigned or undated
    Make promises or predict the future
    Ask: Any questions on maintaining legal integrity?
    Explain: Awareness of these responsibilities is really the key. HR is here to
    support you if you are dealing with a performance or legal “gray area” and need
    help.
    Bridge: So how does this play out in the everyday use of the FCR?
  • Say: When documenting behaviors, there are two important concepts we want to reinforce.
    The first has to do with the amount of time spent on documenting behaviors you want vs. the behaviors you don’t want. This is directly related to what we said around the purpose of the FCR from earlier today, that is to change behavior in the future.
    The second, as we discussed in the FCR Audit review, has to do with using specific behaviors vs. opinions or general observations.
    Bridge: Let’s tackle the first one first, want vs. done want.
  • Say: In every situation, there are always two directions to send your focus (advance slide): what you don’t want (advance slide), and what you do want. One key to being an effective coach is to spend the majority of your focus, and therefore the focus of the employee, on what you do want. You tend to get what you focus on.
    Do: Tell the defensive driving example. When heading toward a tree, look the other way, not at the tree, or you will hit the tree. Tell the skiing example: Look to the next mogul, not the one you are heading toward, or you will run into and over it. You tend to get what you focus on.
    Ask: What does this tell us?
    Say: Today, we will learn how to shift our focus and flip this percentage, so that we spend 80% of our WRITING focus on what we do want and only 20% on what we don’t want. (Write this on the flip chart.) And we will teach our employees to do the same!
    Bridge: Let's continue to look at what we mean when we say, “shift your focus.” Part of shifting your focus is understanding the concept of the “lens.”
  • Do: Introduce the idea that some lenses are useful and some are not.
    Say:
    Our lenses are useful if they help us help our reps change behavior. That is, if they help us focus on what we want to see more of in terms of behaviors and results.
    They are not useful if they prevent us from helping our reps change behavior. That is, if they cause us to focus on what we don’t want and to form opinions or judgments about the person.
    Do: Read Einstein’s quote.
    Say: The key point here is you can’t coach from an opinion. Your coaching becomes effective only when you are able to clarify the behaviors and results that you want.
    Bridge: Here are some other lenses that can get us in trouble.
  • Do: Review the slide bullets and reinforce the key judgment errors that can be applied to your lens.
    Contrast- Compare rating to someone else in district vs. the standard description of the expectation.
    Primary- Link performance to only primary product.
    Halo- Link something done well across multiple competencies or dimensions.
    Familiarity -Rate based on styles that match with you as a manager.
    Cause/Motive- Link performance to an assumed motive.
    Leniency- Overrate the skill ratings on your team.
    Strictness- Underrate the skill rating in hopes of motivating the rep to do better.
    Central tendency- Rate vast majority as meets expectations.
    Bridge: The lens is critical to separate out opinions vs. behaviors.
  • Say: First, let’s define the difference between behaviors and judgments.
    Do:
    Review the differences and elaborate. Then…
    Get a couple of examples of non-useful opinions from DBMs such as, “He is resistant to change” or “She is not receptive to new ideas” or “Poor listener.”
    Say: As mentioned on the last slide, positive judgments such as ”She is my best rep” can get in the way of effective coaching. Why?
    Bridge: Getting to behaviors is super important because of what people actually need to get through any change in behavior. They need clarity of what good looks like and support along the way when they hit it, even partially.
  • Do: Review the SBRA process for Success Written Feedback
    Stress that in writing results, it is important to compare the results to what success should look like. Point out that written feedback in their current comments section of the FCR is a continual comparison of past behavioral observations
    (SITUATION) in relation to what the behavior should be (SUCCESS)
    Bridge: Here’s an example of how this might sound.
  • Do: Review example and point to specifics of SBR.
    Say: After giving written feedback, you and the employee may want to adjust your strategy if progress is not being made over time.
    Depending on the situation, you may want to ask for or suggest an adjustment to the tactics.
    Bridge: With this model in mind, let’s do an FCR writing activity.
  • Do: Review the exercise instructions. Give them 10 minutes work with a partner and rewrite their FCR Comments.
    Debrief: Let’s hear a few of the rewrites.
    Note: There will be managers stating that this process will take too long to write in an FCR. Note that FCRs can’t just be about past observation. It has to be in the context of future success for behavioral change to be maximized.
    Bridge: Now let’s move from the Comments from Work Session to Action/Developmental plans.
  • Say:
    Completing the TD plan and objectives/action plans portions fall right in line with coaching for success. You see, completing the TD plan is mapping the formal solution steps specific to a skill development.
    Do: Review the steps to writing an action plan.
    Say:
    While the TD plan develops skills, the objectives/action plans box is where you state the tactical objectives. Remember, great coaches coach to individual objectives as well as the competency behaviors that aid in achieving the objectives.
    The solution can have several steps, as discussed earlier. So, if it is an involved challenge or stretch goal, it might be useful to break the solution into bite-sized pieces.
    Bridge: Let’s rewrite some TD plans.
  • Do: Review the directions.
    Say: The solution can have several steps, as discussed earlier. So, if it is an involved challenge or stretch goal, it might be useful to break the solution into bite sized pieces.
    Do: Check in with the tables to ensure they understand the exercise.
    Debrief: Let’s hear a few of the rewrites.
    Bridge: Repetition is the mother of skill. Let’s do this with one more of our FCRs.
  • Do: Review the directions and have them work with a new partner to basically rewrite any comments that are observations vs. behaviors and put together a very specific action plan.
  • Note: Optional activity based on available time.
    Facilitate the activity. Read the directions and be aware that the total activity is limited to 20 minutes.
    If there are four table groups, give each topic to two groups---that should enrich the output.
    If there are less than four table groups, be sure each topic is given to at least one table team.
    Debrief: Stress the importance of developing continuity between field contacts and in the overall development process. Suggest solution action steps that can be completed in between the field contacts to keep the development alive.
    Bridge: Now let’s put together our own action plans.
  • Do:
    Give the managers 15 minutes to create their plan on two goals using two planners.
    Ask them to share it with their buddy coach.
    Pull a couple of examples and share them with the overall group.
    Get a copy of the plans before they leave so you can monitor progress and model coaching.
    Make final comments and adjourn.
  • 2007 VELOCITY. All Rights Reserved.
    No part of this booklet, or the seminar of which it is part, may be
    reproduced in any form or by any means without permission in
    writing from VELOCITY. 1-908-431-9681. For internal distribution and use only.

Transcript

  • 1. The Art of Strategic Communication Writing Effective Feedback Andre’ Harrell Head Of International Sales & Operations
  • 2. Why Are We Doing This? “…The Sales Director is perhaps the most important role in the company. No single management team can generate the immediate and sustainable field impact that the Sales Director can.” “Our goal is for our Directors to become master coaches, thereby giving us a competitive advantage in the marketplace.”
  • 3. Outcomes • Review the coaching process; share successes and best practices. • Strengthen the application of the current level of specific behavioral information contained in the Field Coaching Report. • Recognize and implement key division strategic directions during field contacts. • Enhance consistency/continuity in the ability to write Field Coaching Reports to increase productivity.
  • 4. Agenda 1. Coaching field application best practices. 2. Writing the FCR – what good looks like and how to get there. 3. Practice editing your real FCRs.
  • 5. THE “SORS” MODEL “The Strategic Conversation” What is happening now as compared to success Things that cause the situation or barriers to success The outcome: what we are trying to achieve, and what it looks like Steps and roadmap to success Conversation The Setting SUCCESSSUCCESS The Origin The Resolution
  • 6. THE “SORS” MODEL Start at the top, then go below Things that cause the situation; barriers, drivers, beliefs Steps and roadmap to success The outcome: what “good” looks like in behaviors and results What is happening now as compared to success; behaviors you observe; results you can track 80%80%20%20% Spend 80% on the right side The Setting The Origin SUCCESSSUCCESS The Resolution SUCCESSSUCCESS
  • 7.  “Problem” is “agreed” upon; coach asks/tells how to solve it.  Solution is based on a standardized process.  Once “fixed," coach looks for another problem to “fix."  Coach has decided what needs to be “fixed.“  Begins to ask questions to get the employee to see it.  Whatever is said, the coach may add their “two cents." Typical Coaching The Setting The Origin SUCCESSSUCCESS The Resolution
  • 8. Getting Started: Set the Stage Before asking questions, it is important to “set the stage.” This is similar to opening a sales call.  Use a “what and why” statement to relate what you are going to do and why it is important from the representative’s point of view.  Check for agreement. Example: “Let’s talk about your top accounts and see if together we can identify some strategies to help you gain more access. Is that OK with you?”
  • 9. Success: What Is the goal? What? Why? What? Specific area, “Name it” Skill Discuss the “WIIFM” Objective Look like? “Define it” SUCCESSSUCCESS
  • 10. The Setting: Where Are You Now in Relation to the Goal? • Understand the situation from the employee’s point of view. • Discuss observed behaviors in the context of success. • Probe around what the employee did/behaviors, what the customer did/behaviors, and what the result was. • Probe to understand employee’s view of the situation: Is he/she getting closer to success? (Be specific.) The Setting The Origin The Resolution SUCCESSSUCCESS
  • 11. Origin: What Is Getting in the Way of the Goal? 1. Focus: What the employee is thinking about as it relates to the skill/task or goal. 2. Skill: Level of competence in a skill or task. 3. Territory: All things related to external working circumstances. Barriers: Things that get in the way of success or that are causing the current situation. What is getting in the way? The Setting The Origin The Resolution SUCCESSSUCCESS
  • 12. Resolution: How Are You Going to Get to the Goal? Solution: Solutions & options (brainstorm). Test: Test the solutions. Plan: Plan the steps & follow up. 1. 2. 3. The Setting The Origin The Resolution SUCCESSSUCCESS
  • 13. THE “SORS” MODEL Application Key point: Coaching is a conversation! Part 1 (3 minutes). Assemble in pairs; select one of the FEEDBACK FORMS you brought with you. Share with your partner the plan for skill development discussed at the end of the field visit. Your partner will play your representative. This is a discussion you are having with this representative at a breakfast meeting as a quick follow-up to the field session. Part 2 (7 minutes) Follow-Up Coaching Conversation. • Set the Stage • Clarify Success • Understand the Origin • Uncover a Resolution • Reinforce/Revise the Resolution/Plan Success Part 3 (3 minutes). Debrief, page 50 Switch roles and repeat. The Setting The Origin The Resolution SUCCESSSUCCESS
  • 14. The Art of Strategic Communication The FEEDBACK Writing Effective Feedback
  • 15. Clarify Success 10 minutes: In your table groups answer the 3 questions. Flip chart and be prepared to present. What: The written FEEDBACK FORM Why: Identify the top 3-5 reasons for Feedback. What is it in service of? Why do we even write these things? What: What does great look like? Identify the top 5 metrics that would let you know you have written effective Feedback.
  • 16. Feedback: Setting/Origin/Resolution Exercise 30 minutes The Solution: What are 2-3 things we as a leadership team will do in order to raise the impact of our written Feedback and achieve our success goals/metrics? The Setting: Identify what aspect of the findings support our behavior as a team in line with what great looks like. Identify 3-4 areas that, as a group, you would recommend the Sls Dir team focus on to enhance or achieve success writing the Feedback. The Origin: What is getting (or could get) in the way of our goal for written Feedback communication? What aspects are in your control? Success: Stakeholder/Company agreed upon result. The Setting The Origin The Resolution SUCCESSSUCCESS
  • 17. Feedback Review Review the two consecutive FCRs from one Sales representative that you brought with you. 5 minutes •Identify what aspects of your written feedback are aligned with what great looks like. •Identify 1-2 areas that you would want to focus on to enhance your written Feedback. 5 minutes Share with your partner what you learned in this assessment.
  • 18. Two Types of Strategic Coaching Skills & Business Management Business Management • Used to enhance selling strategies or territory management strategies to solve sales problem or optimize opportunity. • Examples: Product X sales, leverages internal resources, creates account business plans, execution of the plan. • Takes place anywhere (field, phone, e-mail, etc.). Skills • Focuses on developing rep’s selling skills and knowledge. • Examples: Stage 2 questions, shape the value/framing, accelerate closure, understanding the disease state, using in- depth knowledge to effectively position products. • Generally takes place in the field. Performance/Sales Results In Service of In Service of In Service of Training and Development Plan Objectives and Action Plan In Service of In Service of
  • 19. What Does Success Look Like? 9IndyMac Bank, August 2003 Performance Review Out comes Other?  Empowerment, initiative Hands-on supervisionOngoing Supervision  Feeling valued, driven Feeling under-valuedEmployee Motivation  Ownership of results The “blame game”Employee Accountability  Prepared for the future Stagnated skills setsEmployee Development  Written record, evidence Conflict, legal risksPerformance Documentation  Aligned priorities Performance “silos”Organizational Synergy  Open, honest, ongoing Limited, defensiveQuality of Communication  Focused execution Unclear expectationsPerformance Turnover  Retention of the best Risk of resignation Impact of Well Prepared & Presented Reviews Impact of Poorly Prepared & Presented Reviews
  • 20. Sales Director’s Role 13IndyMac Bank, August 2003 Collaborat ive Performance Management Manager’s Role  Communicate regularly with employees about performance  Maintain specific performance records and data  Write a thorough, fair, honest, performance review  Give specific, positive, and constructive feedback  Consider the employee’s development interests and career goals  Encourage participation in the discussion  Collaborate on meaningful development & performance goals  Validate the review with the next-level manager  Be confident in the rating  Provide needed direction or support 2007
  • 21. Sales Representative’s Role 11IndyMac Bank, August 2003 Collaborat ive Performance Management Employee’s Role  Communicate regularly with manager about performance  Maintain specific performance records and data  Write a thorough, fair, honest, self-assessment  Be open to specific, positive, and constructive feedback  Share development interests and career goals  Contribute appropriately in the discussion  Collaborate on meaningful development and performance goals  Be accountable for performance  Communicate challenges; ask for needed direction or support 2007
  • 22. Written Feedback Success Tips 14IndyMac Bank, August 2003 Legal Responsibilit y Managers Must:  Document all performance discussions  Show an attempt to help the employee improve  Document consistent or progressively poor performance  Evaluate employees in a timely manner  Focus on job related behaviors  Sign and date the review and ensure the employee does too  Set specific goals with time frames 2007
  • 23. Written Feedback Pitfalls 15IndyMac Bank, August 2003 Legal Responsibilit y Managers Must NOT:  Assume a verbal warning can remain out of an employee’s file  Simply state that employee’s performance is “unacceptable”  Show a sudden decline in performance without documentation  Back date reviews or postpone them  Focus on personality or lifestyle  Allow reviews to go undated or unsigned  Make promises or predict the future 2007
  • 24. Key Concepts •Want – Don’t Want •Behaviors vs. Opinions/Judgments The Setting The Origin The Resolution SUCCESSSUCCESS
  • 25. ` Where Is Your Focus? Don’t Want Want (goal) What you focus on grows!
  • 26. “The theory to which we subscribe will determine what we see.” Albert Einstein Success CycleSuccess Cycle Non-Useful •Don’t Want •Judgments/Opinions Useful •Want •Behaviors/Results
  • 27. Avoiding Judgment • Contrast • Primary • Halo • Familiarity • Cause/Motive • Leniency • Strictness • Central Tendency The Setting The Origin The Resolution SUCCESSSUCCESS
  • 28. Behavior Literacy Behaviors What you can actually see and observe. What people do and say. Results are the outcomes of behaviors that can be measured. Think “sight and sound.” Judgments or Opinions What you interpret or infer from an observation. A description of a behavior and/or the intent behind it.
  • 29. Success Written Feedback Success Write what competency or objective you are working on. Behaviors Results Write the specific actions or behaviors you observed. Write what you saw or heard! Write the impact (or lack thereof) the behavior had on the customer in terms of getting results and how it compared to what success looks like. Add to Build on additional behaviors to get to the goal. The Setting The Origin The Resolution SUCCESSSUCCESS
  • 30. Success Written Feedback Success We were developing Stage 2 questions to open up the dialogue and to encourage the customer to share their beliefs and prescribing rationale. Behavior & Results - Write What You See On 50% of the calls over the two days, you asked two closed probes at the end of the call. The customers responded with a “Yes” or “No” answer and gave no additional information. Add to vs. Didn’t do Focus on incorporating open probes to learn about the customer’s needs and see if we can get the doctor talking. Additional resources that will assist this focus are X and Y. Please give me a weekly voicemail update as to progress until the next field day that we ride together.
  • 31. Written Feedback Activity Part II – 10 minutes •Partner with another Sales Director. •Work together to rewrite the circled comments in the format below. Success Write what competency or objective you are working on. Behaviors Results Write the specific actions or behaviors you observed. Write what you saw or heard! Write the impact (or lack thereof) the behavior had on the customer in terms of getting results and how it compared to what success looks like. Add to Build on additional behaviors to get to the goal.
  • 32. Objectives/Action Plans Skills: Training and development Business Management: Objectives and action plan. Success Write the goal related to competency or objective the plan reflects. You might include behaviors/metrics to measure The Setting The Origin Optional: Behaviors and results observed over the field visit. Optional: The obstacles that must be addressed as part of the solution. Strengths that can be leveraged. The Resolution Specific steps/timeframes toward the goal, preferably developed and agreed to by the sales representative. 1. 2. 3. The Setting The Origin The Resolution SUCCESSSUCCESS
  • 33. Enhancing the Plan/Objectives Part II – 10 minutes •Partner with another Sales Director. •Work together and rewrite the Plan and Action Plan in the “SORS” Model framework where necessary. Success Write the goal related to competency or objective the plan reflects. You might include behaviors/metrics to measure The Setting The Origin Optional: Behaviors and results observed over the field visit. Optional: The obstacles that must be addressed as part of the solution. Strengths that can be leveraged. The Resolution Specific steps/timeframes toward the goal, preferably developed and agreed to by the sales representative.
  • 34. Enhancing the Written feedback 10 minutes: Repeat the process using another Written Feedback Form • Rewrite the comment boxes where needed. • Rewrite the plan to be a skill to be taken to the next level. • Rewrite the action plan to be a business objective to be taken to the next level. • Confer with your partner.
  • 35. Ending the Coaching Day 1) Best practices discussion (10 minutes) • Discuss with your table team one of the following topics: • “How to” productively end the field contact discussion. • “How to” follow up on the field contact. • Post your team findings on the flip chart. • Be prepared to present your best practices with the entire group. 2) Team presentations and general debrief (10 minutes)
  • 36. Action Plan: Self-Development Clarify success for the one area of Feedback writing skills that you identified in the beginning of the workshop. Then use the “SORS” Model process to develop your solution for success!
  • 37. Thank You! The Art of Strategic Communication Writing Effective Feedback