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Vwm20091013

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  • 1. The Comparison of Visual Working Memory Representations With Perceptual Inputs Hyun, Woodman, Vogel, Hollingworth, & Luck JEP: HPP 2009
  • 2.
    • Changes can be detected by means of an unlimited-capacity comparison process, which can be used to direct covert and overt attention but that manual responses depend on a limited-capacity process.
    • The unlimited-capacity comparison process can be limited to specificfeature dimensions.
  • 3. Visual Working Memory (VWM)
    • Working memory : A memory system that holds information temporarily so that it can be used in the service of some task.
    • Visual Working Memory Representations & Perceptual Inputs
  • 4. The Change Detection Task
    • Commonly used to study the nature of the VWM representations.
    • form a perceptual representation->
    • transformed into a stable working memory representation ->
    • maintained across the retention interval ->
    • be compared with the sensory input ->
    • generate a single two-alternative response
  • 5. Prior Research on Perceptual Comparison
    • Taylor (1976)
  • 6. A Theoretical Framework
    • The change detection task can be considered a type of visual search task.
    • three issues
    • limited- or unlimited-capacity perceptual process
    • presence of a feature & absence of a feature.
    • voluntarily or involuntarily attracted
  • 7.
    • three subhypotheses
    • means of an unlimited capacity comparison process
    • comparison asymmetry (search asymmetry effect)
    • a shift of attention to the changed item (voluntary)
    • key difference
    • the initial comparison process is unlimited in capacity in two important ways
  • 8. Experiment 1: Relating Change Detection to Perceptual Comparison
  • 9.  
  • 10.  
  • 11. Experiment 2: Allocation of Covert Attention to the Changed Item
  • 12.  
  • 13.  
  • 14.  
  • 15. Experiment 3: Allocation of Overt Attention to the Changed Item
  • 16. Experiments 4A and 4B: Effects of Set Size on Manual RTs
  • 17. Experiment 5: Do Changes Attract Attention Involuntarily?
  • 18.  
  • 19.  
  • 20. Overview of the Present Study
    • RT increases much more steeply as a function of set size in the any-sameness task. (Exp1)
    • The presence of a changed item in the test array in the any-difference task leads to a shift of attention to the location of this item. (Exp2&3)
  • 21. Overview of the Present Study
    • a limited-capacity process is interposed between the shift of attention and the observer’s button-press response. (Exp4A&4B)
    • The shift of attention to a changed item is under voluntary control. (Exp5)
  • 22.  
  • 23. General Discussion
    • Similarities Between Change Detection and Visual Search
    • Limited- and Unlimited-Capacity Comparison Processes in Change Detection