INTEGRATED FOREST MANAGEMENT PROJECT MIBOSQUE  CARE Central America in Guatemala
Project Context for  MIBOSQUE
HISTORY <ul><ul><li>1959 - CARE is founded in Guatemala  to aid rural families in the areas of agriculture and environment...
LEADING UP TO  MIBOSQUE <ul><ul><li>In 2000 CARE completes first proposal for fixation and retention of carbon (5.2 millio...
GEOGRAPHICAL COVERAGE FOR  MIBOSQUE 11  Municipios 122  Comunidades 6,200  Participantes (89% índígenas)
THE PROCESS <ul><ul><li>The forests in the project are treated as stock and a carbon sink.  As such, the following process...
ESTABLISHED OBJECTIVES <ul><li>GENERAL:  MIBOSQUE  contributes to the reduction of local causes of climate change and envi...
<ul><li>Strengthening the technical, financial and administrative capacities of 11 municipalities regarding the management...
Summary of results 2 <ul><li>Development and approval of 115 projects in the national forest incentive program and others ...
Summary of results 3 <ul><li>Forest repopulation in highly sloped areas in Guatemala, with an annual average of 200 ha of ...
Lessons There are at least four essential components in order to achieve impact in a carbon project: Define and map bounda...
Mobilize and help the communities so that they take charge of the administration of their communal forests
Build capacity among local authorities in order to aid a community in its activities related to the administration of its ...
Future opportunities <ul><li>Support public policy and legal framework related to climate change </li></ul><ul><li>Coordin...
An example of REDD for Guatemala <ul><li>According to the official study  Dynamics of National Forest Cover , Guatemala ex...
Voluntary market?  Regulated market?  Both?  What steps in the cycle are required?  Will we use standards, and if so, whic...
THANK YOU! Marcos Neto [email_address]
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Presentacion Mibosque Ingles Carp

675

Published on

GENERAL: MIBOSQUE contributes to the reduction of local causes of climate change and environmental vulnerability by promoting governance of natural resources and self-sufficiency among populations in order to improve their living conditions
Objective 1 for 2009: That 110 communities and 11 municipalities manage and administer their renewable natural resources in a sustainable manner
Objective 2 for 2009: Build capacity in 11 local governments to administer the natural resources in their jurisdictions
Objective 3 for 2009: That 2200 families served by the project improve their incomes from activities related to forestry and agroforestry

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
675
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Presentacion Mibosque Ingles Carp

  1. 1. INTEGRATED FOREST MANAGEMENT PROJECT MIBOSQUE CARE Central America in Guatemala
  2. 2. Project Context for MIBOSQUE
  3. 3. HISTORY <ul><ul><li>1959 - CARE is founded in Guatemala to aid rural families in the areas of agriculture and environment, health, water and sanitation, education and economic activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1974 – CARE Guatemala develops agroforestry initiative together with the National Forest Institute and The U.S. Peace Corps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1988 - Winrock International recommends to AES that it offer financial support to offset emissions from a power plant in Connecticut, USA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1990 – Memorandum of Understanding between CARE and AES </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1990 - WRI performs LUCS evaluation (Land Use, Carbon Sequestration) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1999 WRI projection overestimates total carbon sequestration (tons per ha, deforestation rates, etc) </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. LEADING UP TO MIBOSQUE <ul><ul><li>In 2000 CARE completes first proposal for fixation and retention of carbon (5.2 million tons) over 10-year period 2000-2009 with the help of AES </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Part of voluntary carbon market </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The mechanisms are flexible and the donor enhances its reputation by supporting a project that helps improve the lives of poor communities while contributing to carbon sinks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MIBOSQUE focuses primarily on the conservation of carbon in natural forests with collective (communal and municipal) tenure, aiming to avoid deforestation and degradation while promoting positive effects on biodiversity and participation of communities and local authorities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Priority areas are zones of poverty located in the upper parts of the principal watersheds in Guatemala’s Highlands region </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. GEOGRAPHICAL COVERAGE FOR MIBOSQUE 11 Municipios 122 Comunidades 6,200 Participantes (89% índígenas)
  6. 6. THE PROCESS <ul><ul><li>The forests in the project are treated as stock and a carbon sink. As such, the following processes are applied: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Baseline establishment for forest </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Tenure and carbon stocks </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Principal causes of deforestation </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Improvement of administrative capacity in communities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Strengthening the ability of municipalities (municipality ≈ county in U.S.), to manage their natural resouces, considering that forest conservation is not an ‘environmental’ problem but rather an opportunity for development, political decision-making and planning </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Establishment of local methodology to measure and monitor carbon </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Generation of alternative sources of income </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Promotion of agroforestry, organic agriculture and appropriate technology </li></ul></ul></ul>
  7. 7. ESTABLISHED OBJECTIVES <ul><li>GENERAL: MIBOSQUE contributes to the reduction of local causes of climate change and environmental vulnerability by promoting governance of natural resources and self-sufficiency among populations in order to improve their living conditions </li></ul><ul><li>Objective 1 for 2009: That 110 communities and 11 municipalities manage and administer their renewable natural resources in a sustainable manner </li></ul><ul><li>Objective 2 for 2009: Build capacity in 11 local governments to administer the natural resources in their jurisdictions </li></ul><ul><li>Objective 3 for 2009: That 2200 families served by the project improve their incomes from activities related to forestry and agroforestry </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Strengthening the technical, financial and administrative capacities of 11 municipalities regarding the management of their natural resources on municipal/communal lands </li></ul><ul><li>Empowerment of 11 local governments to conserve their natural resources, coordinating efforts with the National Institute of Forests (principal governmental entity), through investment in permanent operation of municipal forest offices who also provide service to the people also work in resource mobilization, formulation of projects. </li></ul><ul><li>In 2009, the annual investment of 11 municipalities rose to $38,500 for resource management (salaries, materials, etc.), considering that in 2000 there was no investment in this area. </li></ul>Summary of results 1
  9. 9. Summary of results 2 <ul><li>Development and approval of 115 projects in the national forest incentive program and others related to natural resources and agriculture, with an annual increase of $80,000 for municipal and communal forests during 2004-2008; this has served as investment in local development projects (e.g. greenhouses, agroforestry, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Boundary definition for 60 communal and municipal forests </li></ul><ul><li>Studies of carbon stocks in 53 forests, estimating a total of 1.1 million tons of carbon (average 208 tC/ha) </li></ul><ul><li>Generation of a local methodology to measure stock and carbon sequestration in local forest species, as well as a study to compare the methodology to the one utilized by the U.S. Department of Energy </li></ul>
  10. 10. Summary of results 3 <ul><li>Forest repopulation in highly sloped areas in Guatemala, with an annual average of 200 ha of reforestation and natural regeneration </li></ul><ul><li>Improved adaptation to climate change (watershed protection), with 75 hectares annually converted to agroforestry and/or soil conservation </li></ul><ul><li>Adoption of agroforestry methods by more than 1500 families as an option to improve their incomes. </li></ul><ul><li>In the majority of parcels with agroforestry, productivity and family incomes have increased in many cases over 150% and the corn-based monoculture has been diversified to include vegetables, animal feeds, fuel wood, fruits and production of small cattle </li></ul><ul><li>In some municipalities in the departments of San Marcos and Quetzaltenango, people are ceasing to migrate to find labor on the giant agroexport plantations (e.g. sugarcane) found in the southern coastal regions of the country </li></ul>
  11. 11. Lessons There are at least four essential components in order to achieve impact in a carbon project: Define and map boundaries of forests with collective tenure in order to manage them sustainably
  12. 12. Mobilize and help the communities so that they take charge of the administration of their communal forests
  13. 13. Build capacity among local authorities in order to aid a community in its activities related to the administration of its natural resources Develop economic activities, such as agroforestry, that give the communities an alternative to deforestation Strengthen the area of environmental services together with the Ministry of Environment and other governmental entities
  14. 14. Future opportunities <ul><li>Support public policy and legal framework related to climate change </li></ul><ul><li>Coordinate efforts between NGOs and governmental agencies </li></ul><ul><li>Address vulnerability and adapability to climate change </li></ul><ul><li>Create strategies to mitigate and respond to climate change </li></ul><ul><li>Address hydrological and ecosystem services </li></ul><ul><li>Spread information and educate about climate change </li></ul><ul><li>Promote technological design and corporate responsibility regarding climate change </li></ul><ul><li>REDD program </li></ul>
  15. 15. An example of REDD for Guatemala <ul><li>According to the official study Dynamics of National Forest Cover , Guatemala experienced an average annual loss of of 73,148 ha of forest cover. This corresponds to an annual deforestation rate of 1.43%. </li></ul><ul><li>Proposed project coverage area (hectares) 43,000 </li></ul><ul><li>Project period 5 years </li></ul><ul><li>Area not deforested due to project, per year 614.9 </li></ul><ul><li>Area not deforested over 5 years 3074.50 </li></ul><ul><li>tCO 2 e emissions per hectare/year 550.50 </li></ul><ul><li>Total tCO 2 e emissions avoided over 5 years 1,692,512.25 </li></ul>
  16. 16. Voluntary market? Regulated market? Both? What steps in the cycle are required? Will we use standards, and if so, which ones? Will we distribute the income from carbon to each landowner or will we create a local development fund? If we do the latter, how will it work? And who will manage it? A few discussion points
  17. 17. THANK YOU! Marcos Neto [email_address]
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×