CST-Training_IMC-Krems_2010-05-17
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Presentation for a Training about Child Sex Tourism, held at IMC Krems, 17 May 2010

Presentation for a Training about Child Sex Tourism, held at IMC Krems, 17 May 2010

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  • WHAT HAVE WE ACHIEVED? There have been some important and positive developments around the world to end child-sex tourism. Legally There are many different legal actions that have been taken to end child-sex tourism and to punish abusers. These examples may not apply to every country, but it is helpful to see what some countries are doing and the possibilities that exist. • All governments have laws to punish anyone who sexually abuses a child. • Forty-four countries have laws that allow them to punish their own citizens for crimes committed abroad. • Some countries have set up laws that stop tour companies from supporting or advertising travel for the purpose of sexually exploiting children. • Laws can punish owners of hotels or guesthouses if they allow their customers to sexually abuse children in the hotel or guesthouse. • If an adult is a known sexual abuser, some countries may stop them from travelling to other countries and possibly abusing more children. • Through the legal process in some countries, it is possible for victims of sexual exploitation to receive money by way of damage compensation. • Most countries have made the sexual exploitation of children a crime and a number of them have provided for accordingly severe punishment. • Countries normally use existing international agreements (such as the Convention on the Rights of the Child) to develop their laws to protect children. Internationally Many different groups have taken action at the international level to end child-sex tourism. A few of these groups include: United Nations Created after the Second World War to provide a place for the countries of the world to deal with issues that affect them all. It has a key role in trying to maintain international peace and security. International Labour Organization (ILO) Founded in 1919 to advance social justice and better living conditions throughout the world. In 1946, it became the first specialised agency related to the United nations. Child labour is a key focus of the organisation’s work. World Tourism Organization (UNWTO/OMT) This United Nations agency is the leading international organisation in the field of tourism. It serves as a place where global issues relating to tourism can be explored. United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) The main organisation in the United Nations working for the protection, survival and development of children. It works closely with governments around the world to provide services to children, such as medicines, vaccines, water, food and schooling. ECPAT is a global network of organisations and individuals working together for the elimination of child prostitution, child pornography and the trafficking of children for sexual purposes. International Criminal Police Organization (Interpol) works with police departments in different countries to end child-sex tourism. They have supported training for police officers in many different countries. The following international tools have already been mentioned: • Optional Protocol on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography • The International Labour Organization Convention No.182 • UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (Trafficking Protocol) • The Code of Conduct for the Protection of Children from Sexual Exploitation in Travel and Tourism (The Code) These are all examples of how the international community has come together to fight child-sex tourism. Other examples include: The Convention on the Rights of the Child is a United Nations document that sets out the human rights that all children have. As of November 2008, every country, except for the United States and Somalia, had said that they would use the Convention as the basis for the way they treat children. The Convention is made up of different sections called ‘articles’. In regard to commercial sexual exploitation, the Convention includes promises made by governments to protect children from all forms of sexual exploitation, including child prostitution, child pornography and trafficking, which are addressed in Articles 34 and 35. Regionally Several different organisations and networks have been set up at the regional level, especially in Europe and Asia. 1. The European Union includes 27 countries and has been actively fighting child-sex tourism since 1996. 2. The UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia Pacific (UNESCAP) has played a strong role in fighting child-sex tourism in the region. It supports non-governmental organisations in their efforts to support child victims of sexual exploitation. 3. The UN Inter-Agency Project on Human Trafficking in the Mekong Sub-Region (UNIAP) has developed a regional plan of action to fight human trafficking and to identify ways of working with tourism companies to end child-sex tourism. There are regions in the world, including the Pacific Islands and parts of Africa, where child-sex tourism is still addressed fairly superficially and where the leadership of international organisations is weak. Partnerships Many governments and organisations are working together to end child-sex tourism. For example, training programmes have been designed by non-governmental organisations and shared with hotels and their employees. Other examples include: The Youth Career Initiative (YCI) The Youth Career Initiative is an education programme through which hotels provide disadvantaged young people with training and learning opportunities. The programme now operates in ten countries and is continuing to grow. Weaving Networks against Exploitation Project Various groups are working together to set up an information centre with resources on the exploitation of children and adolescents in Latin America. It will be used as a way to share information and to help develop policies.
  • Conclusions There have been many successes and positive developments aimed at ending child-sex tourism. In summary, a few of them include: The general public now understands that children and adolescents are exploited sexually in tourism. This is a problem that affects us all and we all have a role to play to protect children and their rights. Many businesses and companies, including tourism businesses, are starting to understand the problem and their responsibility to help fight child-sex tourism. Many different groups at the national, regional and international levels are taking action and working together to fight child-sex tourism. Governments see the role they have to play, and many are taking strong action towards ending child-sex tourism. Codes, standards and agreements have been written that provide strong guidance and will help to end child-sex tourism. Even if the situation has improved a little, there are still major challenges and much work ahead for years to come.
  • THE FUTURE Sustaining existing efforts We need to make sure all existing projects and initiatives are supported towards the future. Their benefits will mean nothing if they are not maintained and properly resourced. Governments need to see ending child-sex tourism as an ongoing priority and sustain it properly. Existing projects need to be shared across all levels, so that even more can be achieved through a multiplicity of players. Addressing ‘demand’ More needs to be done to show the public, tourists and employees that sexual exploitation of young people is unacceptable and will result in criminal punishment. We need to encourage people to report the sexual exploitation of children. Countries need to do their part to punish abusers and track their whereabouts so that they cannot abuse again. Demand for children as sexual partners will not end until attitudes towards children change, and there is zero tolerance of sexual exploitation of children and adolescents. Personal safety programmes should be part of educational systems, helping children to understand their own rights, and to speak out if harmed. Addressing the new avenues of child exploitation As technology changes and advancements are made, we are provided with more opportunities and the needed resources to end sexual exploitation of children. At the same time, abusers are also able to access many of these resources and use them to avoid being caught or to get around many of the protective systems that are already in place. Some of the new technological developments may also provide abusers with new ways of exploiting children and of sharing their images with other abusers (for example, Internet access on mobile phones). The private sector and governments need to be leading, at all times, on how technology can be used to end child-sex tourism. Moving from volunteerism to corporate responsibility Businesses and companies need to realise that their role in fighting child-sex tourism is a moral duty, not a choice. We need to see improved policies, at the corporate level, for taking action to end child-sex tourism. Partnerships between different players will remain the priority approach through which the sexual exploitation of children in travel and tourism will have to be combatted over the coming years.

CST-Training_IMC-Krems_2010-05-17 CST-Training_IMC-Krems_2010-05-17 Presentation Transcript

  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism „Offenders Beware!“ Training on Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in Tourism IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 1
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Outline • Expectations / base line • Child rights • Terminology CST • Understanding the phenomenon • Group work „Victims & Perpetrators“ • Combating CST • Communication • Q&A, Evaluation, Summing up IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 1
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Organisations and projects • ECPAT International • ECPAT Austria • Respect – Institute for Integrative Tourism and Development • The Code of Conduct for the protection of children from sexual exploitation in travel and tourism • Offenders Beware! IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 2
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Unrealistic expectations • Horror stories and heart-rending pix • The ultimate clue how to eradicate CST • Ex-cathedra teaching only • A four hour non-stop session IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 3
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Realistic expectations • Understanding CST as an existing phenomenon • Knowing about means how to tackle CST • Learning ways how to communicate about CST IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 4
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Child Rights • 1989: Convention on the Rights of the Child • Only two states have not ratified it yet: Somalia and USA • Protection of the child = every person under 18, unless national law sets earlier majority age • States have to implement it in national law or direct applicability (not in Austria!) • Reports to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child • 54 articles (e.g. right to life, right to education…) IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 5
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Art. 34: Protection from sexual exploitation States Parties undertake to protect the child from all forms of sexual exploitation and sexual abuse. For these purposes, States Parties shall in particular take all appropriate national, bilateral and multilateral measures to prevent: (a) The inducement or coercion of a child to engage in any unlawful sexual activity; (b) The exploitative use of children in prostitution or other unlawful sexual practices; (c) The exploitative use of children in pornographic performances and materials. IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 6
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Optional Protocols to the Convention of the Rights of the Child 1. Optional protocol on the involvement of children in armed conflict 2. Optional Protocol on the Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 7
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Rather YES or rather NO • Would you rather agree or disagree to the following statements – It’s best for children to live under the protection and care of their parents. – if a minor girl wants to prostitute herself on voluntarily, we have to respect her decision – sex tourism only takes place in poor countries IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 8
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Exploitation To exploit someone means to take undue advantage of that person for another’s benefit. In this paper, the term will be used to refer to all forms of exploitation, including: sexual exploitation (tricking, deceiving, forcing someone to perform sexual acts against their will), forced labour, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude, and the removal of organs. IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 9
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Sexual Exploitation of Children Mistreating, abusing and/or taking advantage of a child for personal gain by involving them in sex work or sexual activity (including sexual images on the Internet), which is illegal or inappropriate. IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 10
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Commercial Sexual Exploitation of children Commercial sexual exploitation of children happens when a child is used sexually by an adult and the adult pays to do this with money, gifts or favours. A gift could be food or clothes. A favour could be a promise of good grades, shelter or protection. Commercial sexual exploitation is different from sexual abuse of a child because it involves some kind of payment. IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 11
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Child Sex Tourism (CST) Child-sex tourism is the commercial sexual exploitation of children by people who travel from one location to another and engage in sexual acts with minors. Often they travel from a richer country to one that is less developed, but child sex tourists may also be travellers within their own countries or regions. IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 12
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Old and New CST Destinations in the world Northern Russia South and South Eastern Europe Mexico Cambodia Philippines Costa Rica, Guatemala, Cameroon, Thailand Colombia Honduras Senegal, Kenya The Gambia Bali South 2005 Africa Brazil IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 13
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Northern Russia Estonia Czech Republic Mongolia Bulgaria &Turkey Morocco Nepal Mexico Cuba Myanmar Vietnam Belize Dominican Rep. Senegal India Guatemala Honduras Thailand Laos Gambia Cameroon Cambodia Philippines Costa Rica Sri Lanka Kenya Indonesia Brazil South Africa 2009 IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 14
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism India: Country State District South India Andhra Pradesh Tirupati, Hyderabad, Vishakhapatnam and Vijayawada Karnataka Gokarna, Karwar, Om and Kudle beaches. Kerala Kovalam, Varkala, Cochin, Guruvayoor Tamil Nadu Mamallapuram Pondicherry North India Delhi Central India Uttar Pradesh Agra Rajasthan Jaipur West India Goa Maharashtra East India Orissa Puri West Bengal IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 15
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Cambodia: Phnom Penh, Siem Reap, Sihanoukville, Poipet. Emerging locations: Koh Kong, Kampot, Kep, Banteay Meanchey, Battambang IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 16
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Legal Framework Legal age of sexual consent: • Differs from country to country • Between 13 and 18 years • According to UN-CRC Child = under 18 • Penalties vary IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 17
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Extraterritorial law • Extraterritorial laws enable a country to hold its citizens accountable under their home country laws for committing crimes abroad. • States can prosecute their own nationals and residents who travel to other countries to sexually exploit children. • Witnesses from abroad and foreign police forces can be used to build the case for prosecution. http://www.thefuturegroup.org/youwillbecaught/laws.html IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 18
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Group Work Victim case study 1 Offender Offender case study 1 case study 2 Victim case study 2 IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 19
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Combating CST • Tourism business: Code of Conduct for the Protection of Children from Sexual Exploitation in Travel and Tourism • NGOs: awareness raising and training, identification, research, support victims… • States: Laws and policies, awareness raising, research… • Police / Interpol: international cooperation • Individuals/Tourists? IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 20
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Communication on CST „Hinschauen statt Wegschauen!“ Don‘t look away • Travelers • Tourism industry in the source countries • Tourism industry in the destinations IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 21
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Communication on CST IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 22
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Communication on CST IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 23
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Communication on CST IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 24
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Communication on CST IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 25
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Communication on CST IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 26
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Communication on CST IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 27
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Achievements • Legally • Internationally • Regionally • Partnerships IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 28
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism Conclusions Many successes and positive developments aimed at ending child-sex tourism • General public awareness • Industry responsibility • Action and cooperation on regional, national and international levels • Governments sensitized • Codes, standards and agreements IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 29
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism The future • Sustaining existing efforts • Addressing ‘demand’ • Addressing the new avenues of child exploitation • Moving from volunteerism to corporate responsibility IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 30
  • “Offenders Beware!”–Training on Child Sex Tourism „Offenders beware!“ is a project by a consortium of ECPAT Kindly supported by the groups, supported by the European Commission. European Commission Further information: ECPAT-Österreich Arbeitsgemeinschaft zum Schutz der Rechte der Kinder vor Sexueller Ausbeutung Geschäftsführung: Mag.a Astrid Winkler Trainer: Alserstraße 21/5, 1080 Wien Katrin Lankmayer Tel./Fax: +43(0)1 293 16 66 lankmayer@ecpat.at Mobil: +43(0)6991 923 76 02 e-mail: info@ecpat.at Marcus Bauer M.A. marcus.bauer@respontour.net IMC Krems – 17 May 2010 31
  • ECPAT International is a global network of organisations and individuals working together for the elimination of child prostitution, child pornography and the trafficking of children for sexual purposes. It seeks to encourage the world community to ensure that children everywhere enjoy their fundamental rights free and secure from all forms of commercial sexual exploitation. The ECPAT network is composed of ECPAT groups based all over the world; the International Board, elected by the International Assembly; and the International Secretariat. In 1996, the network consisted of 17 groups. By 1999, it had grown to 53 groups and, in 2007, there are over 80 groups in more than 70 countries. ECPAT groups are very diverse: some are large coalitions of NGOs; some are small groups composed of individuals. Some groups have activities covering a wide range of CSEC issues while others concentrate on only one aspect. The International Secretariat is the administrative and coordinating unit of ECPAT International and is based in Bangkok, Thailand. ECPAT Austria is a network of 11 well-known child rights and development organizations and was established in 2003 as an informal network. In 2006 it was registered as non-profit association and NGO under Austrian law. The main focal areas of ECPAT in Austria are combating child sex tourism; networking and training on raising awareness of child trafficking as well as better care and protection for affected children. Building up a youth network and preventive measures regarding child pornography addressing children and young people are further focal points. ECPAT Austria is a member of the ECPAT International Network with its headquarters based in Bangkok. It was founded in 1989 and has local groups in over 70 countries. The global network of organizations and individuals is working at all levels to build collaboration among local civil society and the broader child rights community to form a global social movement with the aim of eliminating the commercial sexual exploitation of children. CYA (Committee for Youth Action) is a group of young people from different backgrounds such as law, tourism, international development, etc. We fight against the commercial sexual exploitation of children and children’s rights, especially their right to active participation. Our main concern is to give children and young people a voice and empower them through active, participative work as well as via information campaigns. Our field of activities include designing and implementing projects which deal with educating and sensitizing, supporting projects and campaigns and organizing workshops and trainings. respect - Institute for Integrative Tourism & Development is an independent, international, non-profit organisation founded in 1995. respect is committed to the thematic field of worldwide tourism and its impacts on societies, environment and development. Our field of activities are: • capacity building / training • awareness raising and information through public relations & campaigns • applied research about tourism and sustainable development
  • The Code of Conduct for the protection of children from sexual exploitation in travel and tourism is an industry driven responsible tourism initiative in collaboration with ECPAT International, funded by UNICEF and supported by the UNWTO. Suppliers of tourism services adopting the code commit themselves to implement the following six criteria: 1. To establish an ethical policy regarding commercial sexual exploitation of children. 2. To train the personnel in the country of origin and travel destinations. 3. To introduce a clause in contracts with suppliers, stating a common repudiation of commercial sexual exploitation of children. 4. To provide information to travellers by means of catalogues, brochures, in- flight films, ticket-slips, home pages, etc. 5. To provide information to local "key persons" at the destinations. 6. To report annually. Offenders Beware! Five European ECPAT groups and six south partners have joint forces and implementing a 3-years project aiming at increasíng awareness and knowledge on sexual exploitation of children in tourism and building up the capacity for preventive actions among tourism professionals, students as well as other relevant stakeholders such as law enforcement and governmental authorities. The project 'Offenders Beware - Raising Awareness, Capacity and Motivation for the Protection of Children from Commercial Sexual Exploitation in Tourism' is supported by European Commission and several national partners. The overall objective of the project is to contribute to the protection of minors from Commercial Sexual exploitation in travel and Tourism (CST). More specifically, the project aims to make it more difficult for European perpetrators to abuse minors in developing countries and put pressure on them to refrain from this severe human rights perpetration. The specific objective of the project is to increase the awareness, capacity and motivation to take action for the protection of minors from commercial sexual exploitation of children in tourism among European actors involved in tourism from the public and private sectors, media and individuals.