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Literate environment analysis presentation
Literate environment analysis presentation
Literate environment analysis presentation
Literate environment analysis presentation
Literate environment analysis presentation
Literate environment analysis presentation
Literate environment analysis presentation
Literate environment analysis presentation
Literate environment analysis presentation
Literate environment analysis presentation
Literate environment analysis presentation
Literate environment analysis presentation
Literate environment analysis presentation
Literate environment analysis presentation
Literate environment analysis presentation
Literate environment analysis presentation
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Literate environment analysis presentation

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  • 1. R E A D I N GLiterate Environment Analysis Presentation By: Ashley G. Pennington Walden University Dr. Denise Love EDUC6706: The Beginning Reader PreK-3rd
  • 2. R E A D I N G Part I: Getting to Know Literacy Learners• The more you know about your students, the better you will be able to connect them with texts that can have a profound impact upon them (Laureate Education, 2010b).• The emotional response to reading is the primary reason most readers read, and often times the primary reason that a non-reader chooses not to (McKenna & Kear, 1990).• Everyone has experiences that helped shape how they perceive themselves as literate beings (Laureate Education, 2010a).
  • 3. R E A D I N G Part I: Getting to Know Literacy Learners (continued) Through non-cognitive assessments, teachers can learn about a student’s motivations, self-concept, interests, and attitudes (Afflerbach, 2007).• Non-cognitive assessments include: • Interest Surveys • Elementary Reading Attitude Surveys or ERAS (McKenna & Kear, 1990). • Interest Games • “Me Stew” (Laureate Education, 2010b). • Student interviews • Teacher Observations • Literacy Autobiographies
  • 4. REA D ING Part I: Getting to Know Literacy Learners (continued)Cognitive assessments focus on the skills and strategies used by a student as they develop as a reader (Afflerbach, 2007).Cognitive assessments include:• Reading inventories• Developmental Reading Assessments (DRA)• Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literary Skills tests (DIBLES)• Running Records• Checklists
  • 5. R E A te I N G D Part I: Getting to Know Literacy Learners (continued) The cognitive and non-cognitive assessments helped me todiscover the independent, instructional, and frustrational reading levels ofmy students (Afflerbach, 2007). They also gave me insight to theirunderstanding of phonological awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluencyand comprehension (Afflerbach, 2007). This information can be used tohelp make effective lessons for my students. I have learned that it is very important to spend a little bit of extratime getting to know each of my students at the beginning of the year sothat I can better select texts that they will connect to on a personal level.Interacting with the students, their families, and their background is anexcellent way to become ore aware of the student’s interests. As a kindergarten teacher, it imperative for me to ensure thatreading be seen as an exciting task for my students. It is the job of theteacher to increase student interest because it is known that when astudent is interested in a task that they will love doing it and perform thetask for a longer period of time (DiGuilio, 2000).
  • 6. REA D ING Part II: Selecting Text From printed books to digital media, today’s texts come in a variety of forms, all of which should reside in the literacy classroom (Laureate Education, 2010c). The Literary Matrix Linguistic Texts• The matrix is intended to help (word orientated) educators ensure that they have a balance among the texts they use in the classroom (Laureate Education, 2010c). Informational Texts• As an instructional decision maker, the matrix helps you to Narrative Texts see the landscape of texts that you are using in the classroom … It gives you a “big picture” that is often times missed and helps keep goals ever-present in your mind (Laureate Semiotic Texts Education, 2010c). (picture orientated)
  • 7. REA D ING Part II: Selecting Text (continued) Difficulty ConsiderationsText difficulty should • Readabilitybe considered when • Sentence lengthanalyzing texts from • Number of syllables • Concept densitydifferent dimensions(Laureate • Text LengthEducation, 2010c). • Text Structure • Informative • Descriptive • Cause/Effect • Problem/Solution • Compare/Contrast • Poetic • Size of Print • Visual support (Laureate Education, 2010c)
  • 8. REA D ING Part II: Selecting Text (continued)By incorporating all forms of texts into the classroom, teachers canbetter ensure that all learners are given an equal opportunity to learn.When taking all of the previous considerations into account, I wasbetter able to select texts that were appropriate for my students thatthey could read independently and enjoy.The Literacy Matrix is an excellent tool to help teachers keep a recordof what kinds of texts they are regularly using in the classroom.Maintaining a balance of texts is crucial in order to ensure thatstudents are prepared for the future.Reading is such a powerful instrument. I feel so blessed to be able togive that tool to my students. . From narrative, informational, andpoetic, all texts have a purpose. As teachers, our goal is to engagestudents in experiences that will arouse a lifelong love of learning(Castek, Bevans-Mangelson, & Goldstone (2006).
  • 9. REA D ING Part III: Literacy Lesson Interactive Perspective The primary goal of the Interactive Perspective is to teach childrenhow to be literate learners who can independently navigate through the textual world (Laureate Education, 2010d). When approaching literacy instruction from the Interactive Perspective, teachers are to help students become strategic processors (Laureate Education, 2010d). Strategic processing should be threaded through all Five Pillars: phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension (Laureate Education, 2010d).
  • 10. REA D INGPart III: Literacy Lesson Interactive Perspective (continued)Strategic Processing• Being metacognitive about strategy use • Choosing the best/most efficient strategy • Using different strategies for narrative and informational texts • Setting purposes, making decisions, visualizing, and making sense of texts• Being reflective and self-regulating (Laureate Education, 2010d)
  • 11. REA D ING Part III: Literacy Lesson Interactive Perspective (continued) To reinforce the interactive perspective, I adopted a reading lesson that focusedTools used for strengthening on recognition and proper usage of kindergarten level sight words. Thethe Interactive Perspective: students were interactive and expected • K-W-L charts to think critically, during this lesson. Students interactive when physically • Learning logs moving the words from the sentence strip • Word walls into the correct order to create the sentence. Students were thinking • Grand discussions critically when they used their • Hot Seat understanding of sight words and their proper uses to create their own• Interactive Reading Logs sentences. Through this perspective, my students were taught to use various reading strategies, use their metacognition, and given opportunities to practice and put their literary skills to use (Tompkins, 2010).
  • 12. REA D ING Part IV: Literacy Lesson Critical and Responsive PerspectivesThe ability to think critically about a text is essential given theabundance of information in this digital age (LaureateEducation, 2010e). Components of the Critical Perspective include the ability to: • Examine a text from multiple perspectives • Critically evaluate text • Judge validity and/or veracity of text • Think deeply about a text • Evaluate websites for credibility (Laureate Education, 2010e)
  • 13. REA D ING Part IV: Literacy Lesson Critical andResponsive Perspectives (continued)The Responsive Perspective allows teachers to provide students with literacy experiences that will effect them on both personal and emotional levels (Laureate Education, 2010f). Components of the Responsive Perspective include the ability to: • Connect with texts on a personal level • Respond to texts • Become transformed by text on an emotional level (Transaction Theory). (Laureate Education, 2010f)
  • 14. REA D ING Part IV: Literacy Lesson Critical and Responsive Perspectives (continued)The Critical and Responsive Perspectives provide opportunities for students tothink analytically about texts and respond to texts through personalconnections and reflections upon their feelings (Laureate Education, 2010e). Integrating the critical perspective into literacy instruction can help students learn to better critically any text they encounter (LaureateEducation, 2010e). I created a lesson in which the students consider two different perspectives of the same story. The students thenexplain their feelings about how this affects the meaning of story. My students were able to respond to the different perspectives of thestory and see how those perspectives changed the way the students viewed the story. Students were able to think critically about thepurpose of the text and the perspectives of the characters. Students were also given the chance to respond to the text and express their feelings and attitudes.
  • 15. REA D ING Feedback, Questions, or Comments• What insights did you gain about literacy and literacy instruction from viewing this presentation?• How might the information presented change your literacy practices and/or your literacy interactions with students? • In what ways can I support you in the literacy development of your students or children? How might you support me in my work with students or your children? • What questions do you have?
  • 16. R E F E R E N C E SAfflerbach, P. (2007). Understanding and using reading assessment.Newark, DE: International Reading Association, Inc.Castek, J., Bevans-Mangelson, J., & Goldstone, B. (2006). Readingadventures online: Five ways to introduce the new literacies of the Internetthrough childrens literature. Reading Teacher, 59(7), 714-728.doi:10.1598/RT.59.7.12Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010b). Getting To KnowYour Students. [Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Baltimore: AuthorLaureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010a). LiteracyAutobiographies. [Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Baltimore:Author.Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010c). Analyzing andselecting texts. [Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Baltimore: Author.Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010d). StrategicProcessing. [Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, PreK-3. Baltimore: Author.Laureate Education Inc., (Executive Producer). (2010e). Critical Perspective{Webcast}. The beginning reader, PreK-3. Baltimore, MD: Author.Laureate Education Inc., (Executive Producer). (2010f). ResponsePerspective {Webcast}. The beginning reader, PreK-3. Baltimore, MD:Author.McKenna, M. C., & Kear, D. J. (1990). Measuring attitude toward reading: Anew tool for teachers. The Reading Teacher, 43(9), 626–639.Tompkins, G. (2010). Literacy for the 21st century: A balanced approach.Boston, MA: Pearson Custom Publishing.

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