Information solutions Library Management Systems - an Australian case study Anastasia Govan
Information solutions What am l covering today? Project brief for DHF  Regulatory framework for libraries Project steps Li...
Information solutions The work brief <ul><li>Aim </li></ul><ul><li>To provide options for procuring a new LMS and Digital ...
Information solutions Tasks Time 40 hours over 4 weeks
Information solutions How we did it <ul><li>List of criteria  </li></ul><ul><li>Complete system functional specification c...
Information solutions Governance framework 1. Australian Library and Information Association’s ‘ Guidelines for Australian...
Information solutions DHF issues <ul><li>Lack of Northern Territory support for the Horizon (SirsiDynix) product </li></ul...
Information solutions Literature review findings - LMS & Digital repositories Market Summary Number of customers  % share ...
Information solutions RFI respondent overview Thirty vendors were sent the functional specification Nine responded in full...
Information solutions Summary of vendor responses <ul><li>Most vendors did not read the RFI instructions </li></ul><ul><li...
Information solutions Have you considered an Open Source LMS? Only 2% of the Integrated Library System market is held by o...
Information solutions Expected implementation & maintenance costs Riewe (2008) open source savings realised when part of a...
Information solutions Expected project costs
Information solutions Key findings <ul><li>Very few vendors specialise in provision of services to Health Libraries </li><...
Information solutions Recommendations <ul><li>Allocation of at least $250,000 upfront and $30,000 ongoing </li></ul><ul><l...
Information solutions Why we manage information.................. Anastasia Govan Information Architect Phone 0428836405 E...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Lms comparisons apla 2010

955 views
862 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
955
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • So my paper today is essentially about governance structures surrounding ECM and what they mean in when applied to real situations The ASX states………….. Today l will give an overview of the governance areas of Standards, regulations and legislation compliance for ECM; a state, national and sector analysis  The cost of non compliance; Case studies across sectors  Buy in for compliance; a Northern Territory case study
  • In consultation with Library staff, draw up a list of criteria for the assessment of library management systems and digital repository software. Review library management systems (LMS) that offer a digital repository (DR) facility. The facility should be able to be divorced from the LMS in case there is a need to move to another LMS. Additionally, the digital repository must comply with international standards to ensure that data can be extracted and exported to another DR if necessary. If necessary, review standalone library management systems that fulfill the requirements of DHF library staff and clients, and recommend a product for implementation. If necessary, review standalone digital repository software that fulfills the requirements of DHF library staff and clients, and recommend a product for implementation. Assess costs of various options (initial purchase price, ongoing subscriptions and maintenance, data migration from current databases etc) according to cost effectiveness criteria (i.e. ability to meet requirements within budget limits).
  • When we talk about adhering to standards we are really talking about information governance – ECM is the suite of Technology tools that is just one of several other aspects that assist us to manage information. In creating business cases and project initiation documents we all need to be mindful of the legislative framework from which policies, processes, peoples behaviour, standards and audits arise from.
  • In consultation with Library and IT support staff, draw up a list of criteria for the assessment of library management systems and digital repository software. Review library management systems (LMS) and digital repository (DR) modules (all with exclusion of Inter Library Loan module which needs to interface to the recommended solution). The digital repository facility should be able to be divorced from the LMS in case there is a need to move to another LMS. Additionally, the digital repository must comply with international standards to ensure that data can be extracted and exported to another DR if necessary. Complete system functional specification checklist for endorsement by DHF and distribute to vendors as a Request For Information (See Appendix B for a copy of the RFI). Reconcile vendor responses Review standalone library management systems that fulfill the requirements of DHF library staff and clients, and recommend a product for implementation (scale 1 to 5) Review standalone digital repository software that fulfills the requirements of DHF library staff and clients, and recommend a product for implementation (scale 1 to 5) Assess costs of various options (initial purchase price, ongoing subscriptions and maintenance, data migration from current databases etc) according to cost effectiveness criteria (i.e. ability to meet requirements within budget limits).
  • Australian Library and Information Association’s ‘ Guidelines for Australian Health Libraries’ . Section 3.5 of this guideline states “ Technology is accepted as an integral feature of the Library and Information Service (LIS) and is used to support optimum service delivery. The LIS makes appropriate use of computer hardware and software, online technologies, networks, telecommunications and technical support to provide users with ready access to knowledge and evidence-based information resources and services. A Library Management System (LMS) is in place to support the management and operation of library procedures and functions. Given the pace of technological change, emerging technologies are judged on their merits and suitability ” (p. 18). DHF strategy documents also refer to information related objectives for the Library to meet. These include Strategy 1 of the Information Strategy “ Foster an intelligence driven organisation through the effective collection and use of information and knowledge at all levels ” (p.3) and Priority action area 5 (Safety, Quality and Accountability), Item 3.5 of the Strategic Plan states “ Strengthen the use of evidence and best practice in service delivery through knowledge exchange”. ence” The Northern Territory does not have a state equivalent Library Act. The Legal Deposit Act and Information Act govern the receipt, management and access to Northern Territory information, management of corporate records, scanning and publications including online publications. There is also federal legislation such as the Copyright Act affecting access to information. A full list of current information management compliance elements appear below. Goals and objectives of libraries are often inherent in their functions of providing access, cataloguing, reference, document delivery, circulation, preservation, collection development and information literacy as well as corporate functions such as payroll, finance, resource management, system support, reporting, lobbying, training, policy and leadership. Library Management Systems are governed by a raft of standards upon which the system replacement should be based. These include; DHF Strategic Information Plan DHF Corporate Plan Z39.50 transfer protocol Guidelines for Australian Health Libraries Dublin Core/AGLS metadata standards Cataloguing standards including - AACR2, dewey, RDA and FBRB Commonwealth Health and Ageing thesaurus Copyright Act (Cwlth) Legal Deposit (NT) Information Act (NT) NEHTA ehealth datasets W3C Web content accessibility &amp; Mobile Web Best Practices ISO 15489 Records management AS 5037-2005 Knowledge management
  • In consultation with Library and IT support staff, draw up a list of criteria for the assessment of library management systems and digital repository software. Review library management systems (LMS) and digital repository (DR) modules (all with exclusion of Inter Library Loan module which needs to interface to the recommended solution). The digital repository facility should be able to be divorced from the LMS in case there is a need to move to another LMS. Additionally, the digital repository must comply with international standards to ensure that data can be extracted and exported to another DR if necessary. Complete system functional specification checklist for endorsement by DHF and distribute to vendors as a Request For Information (See Appendix B for a copy of the RFI). Reconcile vendor responses Review standalone library management systems that fulfill the requirements of DHF library staff and clients, and recommend a product for implementation (scale 1 to 5) Review standalone digital repository software that fulfills the requirements of DHF library staff and clients, and recommend a product for implementation (scale 1 to 5) Assess costs of various options (initial purchase price, ongoing subscriptions and maintenance, data migration from current databases etc) according to cost effectiveness criteria (i.e. ability to meet requirements within budget limits).
  • Table 1: JISC findings 2008 numbr of sales per Library vendor in the UK
  • So my paper today is essentially about governance structures surrounding ECM and what they mean in when applied to real situations The ASX states………….. Today l will give an overview of the governance areas of Standards, regulations and legislation compliance for ECM; a state, national and sector analysis  The cost of non compliance; Case studies across sectors  Buy in for compliance; a Northern Territory case study
  • 5.3 Open Source LMS Only 2% of the Integrated Library System market is held by open source solutions (Riewe, 2008). Based upon research in relation to the DHF LMS replacement project the following have sites in Australia. Koha is written in the LAMP paradigm and supported in Australia by CALYX information essentials. Koha also has many health related site installations in the UK and used mostly by small libraries. Evergreen is used by the National Library of Australia and is the basis for the international (300 library consortia) for the Open Library Environment project. It was initiated by a 265 library consortia in Georgia, United States and ideally runs on a cluster of Linux servers. The underlying database is PostgreSQL. Digital Commons is supported in Australia by BePress and is stated as being more robust than Dspace by Bepress [1] . The South Australia Open South Consulting Engineers [2] can also assist with implementations and ongoing maintenance. A direct comparison of open source solutions is difficult as they all have different functionality. Balnaves (2008) indicates a metrics-based approach can be used to asses them. Goh et al (2006) also provides an overall checklist for a ‘good’ system. Appendix C gives a checklist for core system elements of an open source LMS and gives a guide for implementation. Visiting functioning sites and benchmarking according to the DHF RFI functional specifications would be best in identifying a good business fit for DHF. [1] http://www.bepress.com/ir/faq.html#faq-7 [2] http://www.saosce.com.au/
  • Riewe (2008) identified that open source savings are realised when libraries are part of a consortia. DHF Users and patrons numbers are approximately 100 times that of the Georgia PINES consortia study. Prior to 2008, Riewe’s study of US libraries found that the Unicorn ILS (Integrated Library System) provided by vendor SirsiDynix, running on a Sun Microsystems server, had server costs of one million dollars initially, and the annual maintenance charges were $558,000. When the system was migrated to Evergreen costs diminished to $150,000 for the server environment and annual maintenance charge of $450,000. Staff training costs of $250,000 were initially incurred. She also contacted several vendors and found the mean initial cost for a proprietary ILS was $24,313 and the mean annual cost was $2,133 for a system with 15,000 catalogue items. Similarly an open source option was $10,700 including hardware and the first year of support. Thereafter, the annual support cost would be $2,500. Open Source system implementations worked because technical staff were trained and employed inhouse to ensure ongoing maintenance.
  • Riewe (2008) identified that open source savings are realised when libraries are part of a consortia. DHF Users and patrons numbers are approximately 100 times that of the Georgia PINES consortia study. Prior to 2008, Riewe’s study of US libraries found that the Unicorn ILS (Integrated Library System) provided by vendor SirsiDynix, running on a Sun Microsystems server, had server costs of one million dollars initially, and the annual maintenance charges were $558,000. When the system was migrated to Evergreen costs diminished to $150,000 for the server environment and annual maintenance charge of $450,000. Staff training costs of $250,000 were initially incurred. She also contacted several vendors and found the mean initial cost for a proprietary ILS was $24,313 and the mean annual cost was $2,133 for a system with 15,000 catalogue items. Similarly an open source option was $10,700 including hardware and the first year of support. Thereafter, the annual support cost would be $2,500. Open Source system implementations worked because technical staff were trained and employed inhouse to ensure ongoing maintenance.
  • That a funding allocation of at least $250,000 upfront and $30,000 ongoing (excluding staffing) be sought from DHF management for the acquisition and implementation of a Library Management System incorporating digital repository, acquisitions, reference (but excluding Inter Library Loans module) and a Project team to test, implement and train That the Library invite those with current health library installations in Australia to demonstrate how their systems work in the DHF environment and visit open source sources and benchmark each system using the DHF FRI functional specifications document A dedicated and system trained Systems Administration role within the DHF Library staff team be identified (at least .5) at an A05-A07 (or equivalent level depending upon qualifications, technical skill and if an open source solution is chosen)
  • Lms comparisons apla 2010

    1. 1. Information solutions Library Management Systems - an Australian case study Anastasia Govan
    2. 2. Information solutions What am l covering today? Project brief for DHF Regulatory framework for libraries Project steps Literature review findings Expected costs Recommendations for Australian/Health systems library
    3. 3. Information solutions The work brief <ul><li>Aim </li></ul><ul><li>To provide options for procuring a new LMS and Digital Repository software </li></ul><ul><li>in order to improve access to, and increase the usage of, the DHF Library’s </li></ul><ul><li>information resources for DHF Library clients </li></ul><ul><li>Project outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>List of criteria </li></ul><ul><li>Review systems with digital repositories </li></ul><ul><li>Review standalone LMS systems </li></ul><ul><li>Review standalone digital repositories </li></ul><ul><li>Assess costs of options </li></ul><ul><li>Deliverables: </li></ul><ul><li>Recommended product(s) meet(s) requirements </li></ul>
    4. 4. Information solutions Tasks Time 40 hours over 4 weeks
    5. 5. Information solutions How we did it <ul><li>List of criteria </li></ul><ul><li>Complete system functional specification checklist </li></ul><ul><li>Reconcile vendor responses </li></ul><ul><li>Review standalone library management systems that fulfill the requirements 5. Review standalone digital repository software that fulfills the requirements </li></ul><ul><li>(scale 1 to 5) </li></ul><ul><li>6. Assess costs of options </li></ul>
    6. 6. Information solutions Governance framework 1. Australian Library and Information Association’s ‘ Guidelines for Australian Health Libraries’ . Section 3.5 2. DHF strategy documents 3. Library Act/Legal deposit legislation 4. Library goals and objectives 5. Library standards
    7. 7. Information solutions DHF issues <ul><li>Lack of Northern Territory support for the Horizon (SirsiDynix) product </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of ability to customize easily onsite </li></ul><ul><li>Current product university focus </li></ul><ul><li>Inherent functional issues </li></ul><ul><li>Library acquiring separate modules from separate vendors to meet their </li></ul><ul><li>requirements </li></ul>
    8. 8. Information solutions Literature review findings - LMS & Digital repositories Market Summary Number of customers % share Total number of HE institutions 183 100 ExLibris (incl. Endeavor) 43 23.50 Talis 42 22.95 SirsiDynix 41 23.40 Innovative Interfaces 33 18.03 Unknown 8 4.37 ISOxford 6 3.28 Infor (formerly Geac) 3 1.64 OCLC Pica (formerly FDI) 3 1.68 Payne Automation 1 0.55 Softlink 1 0.55 VTLS 1 0.55 Axiel 1 0.55
    9. 9. Information solutions RFI respondent overview Thirty vendors were sent the functional specification Nine responded in full 2 responded but identified that their product would not meet DHF requirements 1 of the 9 full responses was for another sites RFI 1 half responded (indicating a demonstration had previously been given to the staff)
    10. 10. Information solutions Summary of vendor responses <ul><li>Most vendors did not read the RFI instructions </li></ul><ul><li>Most vendors could not respond in the two week timeframe </li></ul><ul><li>A detailed sales response was specifically not requested at this stage of the project but most vendors sent it </li></ul><ul><li>Most vendor responses were open in regards to functionality and cost </li></ul><ul><li>Larger commercial vendors appearing more guarded and responding in US $ </li></ul><ul><li>Costs varied dramatically making a straight comparison difficult. </li></ul><ul><li>Software costs (excluding installation etc.) ranged from $8,000 to over </li></ul><ul><li>$120,000 </li></ul><ul><li>Some responses were for hosted only systems, some were for local systems only </li></ul>
    11. 11. Information solutions Have you considered an Open Source LMS? Only 2% of the Integrated Library System market is held by open source solutions In Australia Koha supported in Australia by CALYX information essentials. Koha also has many health related site installations in the UK and used mostly by small libraries. Evergreen used by NLA- basis for the international (300 library consortia) for the Open Library Environment project. It was initiated by a 265 library consortia in Georgia, United States Digital Commons is supported in Australia by BePress and is stated as being more robust than Dspace by Bepress A direct comparison of open source solutions is difficult as they all have different functionality. Balnaves (2008) indicates a metrics-based approach can be used to asses them. Goh et al (2006) also provides an overall checklist for a ‘good’ system. Visiting functioning sites and benchmarking according to the DHF RFI functional specifications would be best in identifying a good business fit [1] http://www.bepress.com/ir/faq.html#faq-7 [2] http://www.saosce.com.au/
    12. 12. Information solutions Expected implementation & maintenance costs Riewe (2008) open source savings realised when part of a consortia - 20% of implementation cost is charged as ongoing maintenance fees SirsiDynix Unicorn ILS (Integrated Library System) server costs of $1m - annual maintenance charges of $558,000 Migrated to Evergreen costs diminished to $150,000 for the server environment and annual maintenance of $450,000. Staff training costs of $250,000 were initially incurred Initial cost for a proprietary ILS was $24,313, mean annual cost $2,133 for 15,000 catalogue items - open source option was $10,700 including hardware and first year and annual support cost of $2,500. Open Source system implementations worked due to technical inhouse employment and training
    13. 13. Information solutions Expected project costs
    14. 14. Information solutions Key findings <ul><li>Very few vendors specialise in provision of services to Health Libraries </li></ul><ul><li>Few vendors have dedicated Australian support </li></ul><ul><li>One vendor provides local support in the Northern Territory (Inmagic) </li></ul><ul><li>Large pricing variances between vendors making comparison difficult based on </li></ul><ul><li>price </li></ul><ul><li>Several vendors provide Software as a Service (SaaS) offerings </li></ul><ul><li>Comparing open source offerings is very difficult due to their individual nature and </li></ul><ul><li>lack of commercial support </li></ul><ul><li>7. Stable, consistent support bases in Australia for open source systems is debatable </li></ul>
    15. 15. Information solutions Recommendations <ul><li>Allocation of at least $250,000 upfront and $30,000 ongoing </li></ul><ul><li>Library invite those with current health library installations in Australia to demonstrate how their systems work in the DHF environment </li></ul><ul><li>Benchmark using the DHF FRI functional specifications document </li></ul><ul><li>A dedicated and system trained Systems Administration role be employed within DHF </li></ul><ul><li>Based upon a mix of fit of the RFI criteria, price, digital repository incorporation and Australian support that Civica (Spydus) and Ex Libris / Koha and Digital Commons </li></ul>
    16. 16. Information solutions Why we manage information.................. Anastasia Govan Information Architect Phone 0428836405 Email [email_address] wwww.inforg.com.au

    ×