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  • 1. Task Force Briefing Book September 9, 2013
  • 2. Table of Contents ___________________________ PresidentialMemorandum Task Force Fact Sheet • Task Force Overview: “An Opportunity to Address Our Country’s Greatest Needs” • CNCS Partnership Examples: “National Service Partnerships in Action” Task Force Program Models: “Ways We Can Help” Slide Presentation (printedwith talking points): “Partnerships to Expand NationalService” Appendix A (Partnership Information): • ED/CNCS Interagency Agreement • ED Match Guidance • FEMA Corps Business Case • DOL Memo on Volunteering Appendix B (CNCSFact Sheets): • CNCS • AmeriCorps • AmeriCorps NCCC • AmeriCorps VISTA • Senior Corps • DisasterServices
  • 3. THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release July 15, 2013 July 15, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT: Expanding National Service Through Partnerships to Advance Government Priorities Service has always been integral to the American identity. Our country was built on the belief that all of us, working together, can make this country a better place for all. That spirit remains as strong and integral to our identity today as at our country's founding. Since its creation 20 years ago, the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) has been the Federal agency charged with leading and expanding national service. The Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act of 2009 (SAA) expanded CNCS's authority to create opportunities for more Americans to serve. This landmark, bipartisan legislation focuses national service on six areas: emergency and disaster services; economic opportunity; education; environmental stewardship; healthy futures; and veterans and military families. The SAA provides greater opportunities for CNCS to partner with other executive departments and agencies (agencies) and with the private sector to utilize national service to address these critical areas. National service and volunteering can be effective solutions to national challenges and can have positive and lasting impacts that reach beyond the immediate service experience. Americans engaged in national service make an intensive commitment to tackle unmet national and local needs by working through non-profit, faith-based, and community organizations. Service can help Americans gain valuable skills, pursue higher education, and jumpstart their careers, which can provide immediate and long-term benefits to those individuals, as well as the communities in which they serve. Americans are ready and willing to serve. Applications from Americans seeking to engage in national service programs far exceed the number of available positions. By creating new partnerships between agencies and CNCS that expand national service opportunities in areas aligned with agency missions, we can utilize the American spirit of service to improve lives and communities, expand economic and educational opportunities, enhance agencies' capacity to achieve their missions, efficiently use tax dollars, help individuals develop skills that will enable them to prepare for long-term careers, and build a pipeline to employment inside and outside the Federal Government.
  • 4. 2 Therefore, by the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to expand the positive impact of national service, I hereby direct the following: Section 1. Establishing a Task Force on Expanding National Service. There is established a Task Force on Expanding National Service, to be co-chaired by the Chief Executive Officer of CNCS and the Director of the Domestic Policy Council, which shall include representatives from agencies and offices that administer programs and develop policies in areas that include the six focus areas set forth in the SAA. The Task Force shall include representatives from: (a) the Department of Defense; (b) the Department of Justice; (c) the Department of the Interior; (d) the Department of Agriculture; (e) the Department of Commerce; (f) the Department of Labor; (g) the Department of Health and Human Services; (h) the Department of Housing and Urban Development; (i) the Department of Transportation; (j) the Department of Energy; (k) the Department of Education; (l) the Department of Veterans Affairs; (m) the Department of Homeland Security; (n) the Peace Corps; (o) the National Science Foundation; (p) the Office of Personnel Management; (q) the Environmental Protection Agency; (r) the White House Office of Cabinet Affairs; and (s) such other agencies and offices as the co-chairs may designate. Sec. 2. Mission and Function of the Task Force. (a) The Task Force shall: (i) identify existing, and, if appropriate, recommend new, policies or practices that support the expansion of national service and volunteer opportunities that align with the SAA and agency priorities;
  • 5. 3 (ii) make recommendations on the most effective way to coordinate national service and volunteering programs across the Federal Government; (iii) identify and develop opportunities for interagency agreements between CNCS and other agencies to support the expansion of national service and volunteering; (iv) identify and develop public-private partnerships to support the expansion of national service and volunteering; (v) identify and develop strategies to use innovation and technology to facilitate the ability of the public to participate in national service and volunteering activities; and (vi) develop a mechanism to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of national service and volunteering interventions in achieving agency priorities, and aggregate and disseminate the results of that evaluation. (b) Within 18 months of the date of this memorandum, the Task Force shall provide the President with a report on the progress made with respect to the functions set forth in subsection (a) of this section. Sec. 3. Facilitating National Service and Volunteering Partnerships. (a) Each agency on the Task Force shall: (i) within 180 days of the date of this memorandum, consult with CNCS about how existing authorities and CNCS programs can be used to enter into interagency and public-private partnerships that allow for meaningful national service and volunteering opportunities, including participating in AmeriCorps, and help the agency achieve its mission; (ii) work with CNCS to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of such partnerships; and (iii) work with CNCS to identify ways in which the agency's national service participants and volunteers can develop transferable skills, and also how national service can serve as a pipeline to employment inside and outside the Federal Government. (b) Where practicable, agencies may consider entering into interagency agreements with CNCS to share program development and funding responsibilities, as authorized under 42 U.S.C. 12571(b)(1). Sec. 4. Recruitment of National Service Participants in the Civilian Career Services. In order to provide national service participants a means to pursue additional opportunities to continue their public service through career civilian service, the Office of Personnel Management shall, within 120 days of the date of this memorandum, issue guidance to agencies on developing and improving Federal recruitment strategies for participants in national service.
  • 6. 4 Sec. 5. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this memorandum shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect: (i) the authority granted by law or Executive Order to an agency, or the head thereof; or (ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals. (b) This memorandum shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations. (c) This memorandum is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person. (d) The Chief Executive Officer of CNCS is hereby authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the Federal Register. BARACK OBAMA # # #
  • 7. THE PRESIDENT’S CALL TO ACTION On July 15, President Obama issued a Presidential Memorandum that establishes the Task Force on Expanding National Service. The Task Force consists of representatives of 13 cabinet departments, six additional federal agencies and offices, and other agencies to be designated. Wendy Spencer, the CEOof the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), and Cecilia Muñoz, the Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, will co-chair the Task Force. THE GOAL OF THE TASK FORCE The Task Force will advance Agency and Administration priorities through the expansion of national service. SIX WAYS TO ACHIEVE OUR GOAL 1. Interagency Service Corps – Launch new national service corps through interagency partnerships 2. Pipeline to Public Service – Create a pipeline of Americans who are ready to enter public service and apply the skills they learn through national service 3. Policy Solutions – Explore policy solutions that advance the Task Force’s goal 4. Efficiency through Innovation – Increase the efficiency of tax dollars through the use of innovation and technology 5. Public-Private Partnerships – Identify public-private partnerships to expand national service 6. Cross-Agency Coordination – Coordinate volunteering and service programs across the federal government HOW CNCS CAN WORK WITH AGENCIES CNCS is a federal agency that brings 20 years of experience of delivering national service and volunteerism as solutions to our communities. More than 80,000 AmeriCorps members and 360,000 Senior Corps volunteers tackle the most pressing challenges facing America: educating millions of students; supporting individuals and families on the road to economic recovery; supporting veterans and military families; helping communities rebuild after disasters; improving at-risk ecosystems; and providing healthy futures for children across the country. Task Force Overview: An Opportunity to Address Our Nation’s Greatest Needs
  • 8. FEMA CORPS, a partnership between the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Corporation for National and Community Service, is a new 1,600 member AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps program solely devoted to disaster response and recovery. FEMA Corps members provided invaluable service in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy and recent tornadoes in the Midwest and have developed innovative ways to serve disaster survivors – all while saving taxpayer dollars. SCHOOL TURNAROUND AMERICORPS, a partnership between the Department of Education and CNCS, will bring more than 650 new AmeriCorps members into the nation’s lowest- performing schools to support and sustain turnaround efforts. These AmeriCorps members will work to boost student academic achievement, attendance, high school graduation rates, and college and career readiness. This initiative will maximize the Department of Education’s existing investment in the School Improvement Grant (SIG) program. STEM AMERICORPS, which President Obama announced at the White House Science Fair this spring, is a multi-year initiative to place hundreds of AmeriCorps members in nonprofits across the country. These members will mobilize STEM professionals to inspire young people to excel in science, technology, engineering, and math. This will in turn build the pipeline for future STEM careers. STEM AmeriCorps builds on the President’s “Educate to Innovate,” a nationwide effort to move American students from the middle to the top of the pack in science and math achievement over the next decade. National Service Partnerships in Action
  • 9. CAPACITY BUILDING DIRECT SERVICE: TEAM-BASED DIRECT SERVICE: GRANT PROGRAMS Description of Service AmeriCorps members or Senior Corps volunteers work with organizations to provide community support and organization. Members may coordinate volunteers, but are not actual service providers. For example, members would recruit volunteer tutors rather than tutor children directly. AmeriCorps members serve in teams to accomplish service projects that range in length from four weeks to 10 months. Projects could include restoring trails, tutoring children, or building homes for low-income residents. AmeriCorps members or Senior Corps volunteers serve with non-profit organizations and community partners (e.g. Habitat for Humanity, City Year, YouthBuild, Jumpstart, etc.) to address community needs. Example of Existing Partnership STEM AmeriCorps members will serve with nonprofits across the country to mobilize STEM professionals to help young people excel in science, technology, engineering, and math. FEMA Corps is a partnership between the Federal Emergency Management Agency and CNCS. It is a team-based program that places members around the country to provide critical support after disasters and develop the next generation of emergency managers. School Turnaround AmeriCorps is a partnership between the Department of Education and CNCS that places members with grantee partners at the nation’s lowest performing schools where they will work to boost student achievement, attendance, and graduation rates. Applicable CNCS Programs • AmeriCorps State and National • AmeriCorps NCCC • AmeriCorps VISTA • Senior Corps - RSVP • AmeriCorps State and National • AmeriCorps NCCC • AmeriCorps VISTA – Summer Associate • AmeriCorps State and National • Senior Corps - RSVP Average Timeline (From identifying agency priority to getting boots on the ground) • Three months to one year • Three to six months • Three months to one year How long does a member serve? • Four weeks to one year • Four weeks to 10 months • As long as one year (part-time or full-time capacity) Length of Partnership • Four weeks to three years • Eight weeks to three years • Three years Will revise this timeline to reflect the entire process (incl. agency planning, then IAA, then boots) Ways We Can Help: Our Program Models
  • 10. Slide 1 Partnerships to Expand National Service How To Create Opportunity, Increase Efficiency, and Achieve Your Mission This PowerPoint presentation provides added context for the Task Force on Expanding National Service. It will give you an overview of how to use national service to achieve your mission, and can serve as a resource for your staff to learn and share key information. [Additional introductory content here]
  • 11. Slide 2 Agenda • Task Force Overview • Interagency Partnerships • Introduction to CNCS • This presentation will provide background and context for the Task Force on Expanding National Service. • We’ll look at several examples of successful partnerships. • You’ll get a simplified explanation of how to work with the Corporation for National and Community Service to achieve the President’s goals. • And we’ll introduce you to CNCS and its major initiatives.
  • 12. Slide 3 Task Force Overview
  • 13. Slide 4 Task Force Announcement And today I want to announce a new task force […] to take a fresh look at how we can better support national service – in particular, on some of our most important national priorities: improving schools, recovering from disasters and mentoring our kids. -- President Obama, July 15, 2013 • Building on a longstanding tradition of bipartisan support for national service and volunteerism, President Obama issued a Presidential Memorandum that establishes an interagency Task Force led by the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), at an event honoring President George H.W. Bush for his life of service. • The Task Force will develop strategies to expand national service to meet national needs through collaboration with other Federal agencies and the private sector, and; is the latest in a series of actions the Administration has taken over the past four years to expand opportunities for Americans to serve, focus service on pressing challenges. • Among other activities, the Task Force will make recommendations on polices to expand national service opportunities, recommend ways to coordinate volunteering and service programs across the Federal government, develop opportunities for interagency agreements between CNCS and other federal agencies, and identify public-private partnerships to expand national service. • Over the next six months, agencies participating on the Task Force will confer with CNCS about potential partnerships to engage more Americans in national service to solve problems and advance agency priorities. • By creating new interagency and public-private partnerships for national service, the President’s action will engage more Americans in results-driven service, expand economic and educational opportunities for those who serve, enhance Federal
  • 14. agencies’ capacity to achieve their missions, more efficiently use tax dollars, and build the pipeline of Americans ready to enter public service.
  • 15. Slide 5 Task Force Partners • Co-chaired by the CEO of CNCS, Wendy Spencer and the Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, Cecilia Muñoz, the National Service Task Force partners include the following 17 agencies and offices (and other agencies to be designated): the Department of Defense the Department of Justice the Department of the Interior the Department of Agriculture the Department of Commerce the Department of Labor the Department of Health and Human Services the Department of Housing and Urban Development the Department of Transportation the Department of Energy the Department of Education the Department of Veterans Affairs the Department of Homeland Security the Peace Corps the National Science Foundation the Office of Personnel Management the Environmental Protection Agency
  • 16. Slide 6 Interagency Partnerships
  • 17. Slide 7 Partnerships and Growth Agency logo Placeholder • Solve Problems • Increase Efficiency • Achieve Priorities • Create Opportunities When you partner with national service, you get a cost-effective, human-capital solution that builds pathways to opportunity and helps achieve your agency’s mission. We help you: • Achieve priorities • Create opportunities • Solve problems • Increase efficiency Goals of partnerships: • Create partnerships to grow national service • Inspire innovation in the national service field • Work cross-sector to address critical national and local needs • Generate innovative funding models that leverages and fosters effective use of tax- payer and private dollars • Ensure accountability and collective impact through evidence-based program selection and measured growth Some examples of our partnership program models demonstrate how a federal agency has identified a clear problem for which national service can provide a solution.
  • 18. Slide 8 How You Can Partner With Us • How can national service help meet your agency’s mission? • New corps for “capacity-building” or “boots on the ground” Three Program Models: • Capacity Building • Direct Service: Team-Based • Direct Service: Grant Programs • Expand policies or practices within your agency to support national service • [Provide examples tailored to each agency] • There are things you can do today to support national service: • Example: Dept. of Ed. match letter
  • 19. Slide 9 Direct Service: Team-Based Description of Service AmeriCorps members serve in teams to accomplish service projects that range in length from four weeks to 10 months. Projects could include restoring trails, tutoring children, or building homes for low-income residents. Applicable CNCS Programs AmeriCorps State and National AmeriCorps NCCC AmeriCorps VISTA – Summer Associate Average Timeline (From identifying agency priority to getting boots on the ground) Three months to one year Three to six months Three months to one year How long does a member serve? Four weeks to one year Four weeks to 10 months As long as one year (part-time or full-time capacity) Length of Partnership Four weeks to three years Eight weeks to three years Three years
  • 20. Slide 10 FEMA Corps Example of Existing Partnership FEMA Corps is a partnership between the Federal Emergency Management Agency and CNCS. It is a team-based program that places members around the country to provide critical support after disasters and develop the next generation of emergency managers. • In the Spring of 2013, CNCS partnered with FEMA to announce the creation of a new program designed to strengthen the nation's ability to respond to and recover from disasters while expanding career opportunities for young people. • FEMA Corps is a new 1,600-member program of AmeriCorps NCCC solely devoted to disaster response and recovery. • FEMA Corps strengthens disaster capacity, prepares young people for emergency management careers, and saves significant taxpayer dollars. • FEMA Corps members provided invaluable service in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy and recent tornadoes in the Midwest and have developed innovative ways to serve disaster survivors. • President Obama recently recognized FEMA Corps in his remarks presenting the new management agenda, stating: “For example, until recently, when a natural disaster struck, teams from FEMA had to rely exclusively on in-person inspections to figure out which families needed help. Now they analyze satellite and aerial imagery and get housing assistance to areas that need it
  • 21. most, more quickly. After Hurricane Sandy, most folks were able to sign up for assistance using FEMA’s mobile and web apps -- updating and checking the status of their applications. And FEMA agents went door-to-door in some areas with iPads, helping residents who had lost power and Internet access sign up for disaster relief without leaving their homes. So making sure that we’re delivering services better, faster, more efficiently.”
  • 22. Slide 11 Direct Service: Grant Programs Description of Service AmeriCorps members or Senior Corps volunteers serve with non-profit organizations and community partners (e.g. Habitat for Humanity, City Year, YouthBuild, Jumpstart, etc.) to address community needs. Applicable CNCS Programs AmeriCorps State and National Senior Corps - RSVP Average Timeline (From identifying agency priority to getting boots on the ground) TBD: Three months to one year How long does a member serve? As long as one year (part-time or full-time capacity) Length of Partnership Three years
  • 23. Slide 12 School Turnaround AmeriCorps Example of Existing Partnership School Turnaround AmeriCorps is a partnership between the Department of Education and CNCS that places members with grantee partners at the nation’s lowest performing schools where they will work to boost student achievement, attendance, and graduation rates. • In February, 2013, CNCS CEO Wendy Spencer joined U.S. Sec. of Education Arne Duncan to announce School Turnaround AmeriCorps, a new competitive grant program to reinforce and accelerate intervention efforts in the nation’s lowest- performing schools. • School Turnaround AmeriCorps is a partnership between the Department of Education and AmeriCorps that will bring more than 650 new AmeriCorps members into some of our lowest-performing schools this fall, where they will work to boost student academic achievement, attendance, high school graduation rates, and college and career readiness. • In July 2013, the first School Turnaround AmeriCorps grants were announced, with $15 million over three years going to 13 organizations in 70 urban and rural communities across the country. • School Turnaround AmeriCorps will leverage an anticipated $18 million in grantee match funding in addition to the $15 million in federal funds during a three-year cycle. The 13 awardees were selected from 66 applicants from around the country.
  • 24. Slide 13 Capacity Building Description of Service AmeriCorps members or Senior Corps volunteers work with organizations to provide community support and organization. Members may coordinate volunteers, but are not actual service providers. For example, members would recruit volunteer tutors rather than tutor children directly. Applicable CNCS Programs AmeriCorps State and National AmeriCorps NCCC AmeriCorps VISTA Senior Corps - RSVP Average Timeline (From identifying agency priority to getting boots on the ground) TBD How long does a member serve? Four weeks to one year Length of Partnership Four weeks to three years
  • 25. Slide 14 STEM AmeriCorps Example of Existing Partnership STEM AmeriCorps members will serve with nonprofits across the country to mobilize STEM professionals to help young people excel in science, technology, engineering, and math. • STEM AmeriCorps, which President Obama announced at the White House Science Fair this spring, is a multi-year initiative to place hundreds of AmeriCorps members in nonprofits across the country to mobilize STEM professionals to inspire young people to excel in science, technology, engineering, and math to build the pipeline for future STEM careers. • In the first phase, CNCS will place 50 full-time AmeriCorps members with FIRST® (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology), a nonprofit founded by inventor Dean Kamen to inspire an appreciation of science and technology in young people through robotics competitions. • The AmeriCorps members will serve in low-income communities across the country. They will recruit volunteers and support teams of students to participate in FIRST competitions, making it possible for more students to be exposed to the STEM fields. • Through a grant competition in late 2013, CNCS will provide funding to hundreds of STEM-focused AmeriCorps members across the country. AmeriCorps members will recruit and support thousands of STEM professionals to volunteer through in-school, after-school, and other academic programs. To maximize this opportunity, CNCS will
  • 26. pursue partnerships with both the private sector and other federal agencies.
  • 27. Slide 15 About CNCS
  • 28. Slide 16 Who We Are $850 million leveraged 5 million Americans 70,000 locations • The Corporation for National and Community Service is a federal agency that engages more than five million Americans in service through its AmeriCorps, Senior Corps, Social Innovation Fund, and Volunteer Generation Fund programs, and leads the President's national call to service initiative, United We Serve. • National service engages citizen volunteers in problem-solving, uses competition to fund high-value programs, leverages substantial outside support, and mobilizes volunteers to multiply impact. CNCS programs annually mobilize 5 million volunteers and leverage hundreds of millions of dollars of non-CNCS resources from business, foundations, and other sources. • CNCS is already working with other federal agencies to leverage national service to meet national needs. The Presidential Memorandum will accelerate those efforts and open the door to new partnerships. Expanding upon its existing system of private sector matching, CNCS is also actively reaching out to corporations, foundations, and other funders to secure additional support for national service.
  • 29. Slide 17 Our Focus Areas Disaster Services Economic Opportunity Education Environmental Stewardship Healthy Futures Veterans and Military Families • With bipartisan Congressional support, the President has worked with CNCS to focus service on pressing social problems; expand opportunities for more Americans of all ages and backgrounds to serve; build the capacity of individuals, nonprofits, and communities; and embrace social innovation. • CNCS recognizes that national service will have its greatest impact if we target resources on a core set of critical problems and carefully measure our progress and prioritizes six major challenges facing communities: disaster services, economic opportunity, education, environmental stewardship, healthy futures, and veterans and military families.
  • 30. Slide 18 Our Programs • AmeriCorps provides opportunities for more than 80,000 Americans each year to give intensive service to their communities and country through three programs: AmeriCorps (grants), AmeriCorps VISTA, and AmeriCorps NCCC (National Civilian Community Corps). • AmeriCorps members tutor and mentor youth, build affordable housing, assist veterans and military families, provide health services, run after-school programs, help communities respond to disasters, and build the capacity of nonprofit groups to become self-sustaining, among many other activities. • AmeriCorps members in recent years have stepped up their role in recruiting, training, and managing volunteers of all ages and backgrounds, supporting 3.4 million community volunteers in 2011 alone. • In exchange for a year of full-time service, members earn a Segal AmeriCorps Education Award that can be used to pay for college or graduate school, or to pay back qualified student loans. Since 1994, more than 800,000 Americans have given 1 billion hours of service through AmeriCorps.
  • 31. Slide 19 Our Programs • Each year Senior Corps taps the skills, talents, and experience of more than 330,000 Americans age 55 and older to meet a wide range of community challenges through three programs: RSVP, the Foster Grandparent Program, and the Senior Companion Program. • RSVP volunteers help local police departments conduct safety patrols, participate in environmental projects, provide intensive educational services to children and adults, and respond to natural disasters, among many other activities. • Foster Grandparents serve one-on-one as tutors and mentors to young people with special needs. • Senior Companions help homebound seniors and other adults maintain independence in their own homes.
  • 32. Slide 20 Our Programs Social Innovation Fund • The Social Innovation Fund represents a new approach by the federal government to address urgent national challenges. • As part of the Administration’s innovation agenda, CNCS launched the Social Innovation Fund, a unique model that improves the lives of people in low-income communities and expands the impact of high-performing organizations using evidence-based practices. • In its first three years, the Social Innovation Fund has invested in 200 nonprofit organizations in 34 states and Washington, DC and served more than 174,000 individuals. Through its unique 3 to 1 match structure, it has attracted commitments of more than $350 million in private and non-federal funds.
  • 33. Slide 21 Our Programs Volunteer Generation Fund 19 states • CNCS strengthens the impact of America’s volunteers by bringing more individuals into service and building the capacity of nonprofits to effectively manage volunteers. • That’s why CNCS is thrilled that the President’s FY 2014 budget requests a significant increase in the Volunteer Generation Fund, a CNCS program to strengthen volunteer management practices, and proposes renaming the program the George H.W. Bush Volunteer Generation Fund. • CNCS also leads national days of service: in particular, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service and the September 11th National Day of Service and Remembrance. Annually, these events provide opportunities for 760,000 volunteers to serve every year. • In June 2009, CNCS joined with the White House to launch United We Serve, a challenge to all Americans to engage in sustained, meaningful community service to help in our nation's renewal and recovery. Americans have responded enthusiastically to the President's call, joining with friends and neighbors to replenish food banks, support veterans and military families, restore public lands, and more. • The Administration worked with technology leaders to develop a volunteer matching tool for the Serve.gov website featuring more than 250,000 volunteer opportunities, and teamed up with top sports stars and celebrities to promote volunteer service.
  • 34. Slide 22 Our Grantees • CNCS programs provide grants to some of the nation’s leading nonprofits, including familiar names like the American Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity, Big Brothers Big Sisters, and more.
  • 35. Slide 23 Our Corporate Supporters • Most organizations who receive CNCS grants are required to obtain matching funds with non-CNCS resources, which often includes private sector and corporate entities. • In addition, CNCS has found opportunities to sponsor with its corporate supporters in other ways. For example: • Time Warner, Southwest Airlines, and Shell also supported AmeriCorps response efforts in Hurricane Sandy-affected New York and New Jersey. • Google is financing an AmeriCorps program designed to help nonprofits effectively use technology to further their missions. • And Bank of America has enlisted AmeriCorps members to support financial literacy efforts.
  • 36. Slide 24 Discuss Partnership This slide will include appropriate CNCS contact information.
  • 37. THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release July 15, 2013 July 15, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT: Expanding National Service Through Partnerships to Advance Government Priorities Service has always been integral to the American identity. Our country was built on the belief that all of us, working together, can make this country a better place for all. That spirit remains as strong and integral to our identity today as at our country's founding. Since its creation 20 years ago, the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) has been the Federal agency charged with leading and expanding national service. The Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act of 2009 (SAA) expanded CNCS's authority to create opportunities for more Americans to serve. This landmark, bipartisan legislation focuses national service on six areas: emergency and disaster services; economic opportunity; education; environmental stewardship; healthy futures; and veterans and military families. The SAA provides greater opportunities for CNCS to partner with other executive departments and agencies (agencies) and with the private sector to utilize national service to address these critical areas. National service and volunteering can be effective solutions to national challenges and can have positive and lasting impacts that reach beyond the immediate service experience. Americans engaged in national service make an intensive commitment to tackle unmet national and local needs by working through non-profit, faith-based, and community organizations. Service can help Americans gain valuable skills, pursue higher education, and jumpstart their careers, which can provide immediate and long-term benefits to those individuals, as well as the communities in which they serve. Americans are ready and willing to serve. Applications from Americans seeking to engage in national service programs far exceed the number of available positions. By creating new partnerships between agencies and CNCS that expand national service opportunities in areas aligned with agency missions, we can utilize the American spirit of service to improve lives and communities, expand economic and educational opportunities, enhance agencies' capacity to achieve their missions, efficiently use tax dollars, help individuals develop skills that will enable them to prepare for long-term careers, and build a pipeline to employment inside and outside the Federal Government.
  • 38. 2 Therefore, by the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to expand the positive impact of national service, I hereby direct the following: Section 1. Establishing a Task Force on Expanding National Service. There is established a Task Force on Expanding National Service, to be co-chaired by the Chief Executive Officer of CNCS and the Director of the Domestic Policy Council, which shall include representatives from agencies and offices that administer programs and develop policies in areas that include the six focus areas set forth in the SAA. The Task Force shall include representatives from: (a) the Department of Defense; (b) the Department of Justice; (c) the Department of the Interior; (d) the Department of Agriculture; (e) the Department of Commerce; (f) the Department of Labor; (g) the Department of Health and Human Services; (h) the Department of Housing and Urban Development; (i) the Department of Transportation; (j) the Department of Energy; (k) the Department of Education; (l) the Department of Veterans Affairs; (m) the Department of Homeland Security; (n) the Peace Corps; (o) the National Science Foundation; (p) the Office of Personnel Management; (q) the Environmental Protection Agency; (r) the White House Office of Cabinet Affairs; and (s) such other agencies and offices as the co-chairs may designate. Sec. 2. Mission and Function of the Task Force. (a) The Task Force shall: (i) identify existing, and, if appropriate, recommend new, policies or practices that support the expansion of national service and volunteer opportunities that align with the SAA and agency priorities;
  • 39. 3 (ii) make recommendations on the most effective way to coordinate national service and volunteering programs across the Federal Government; (iii) identify and develop opportunities for interagency agreements between CNCS and other agencies to support the expansion of national service and volunteering; (iv) identify and develop public-private partnerships to support the expansion of national service and volunteering; (v) identify and develop strategies to use innovation and technology to facilitate the ability of the public to participate in national service and volunteering activities; and (vi) develop a mechanism to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of national service and volunteering interventions in achieving agency priorities, and aggregate and disseminate the results of that evaluation. (b) Within 18 months of the date of this memorandum, the Task Force shall provide the President with a report on the progress made with respect to the functions set forth in subsection (a) of this section. Sec. 3. Facilitating National Service and Volunteering Partnerships. (a) Each agency on the Task Force shall: (i) within 180 days of the date of this memorandum, consult with CNCS about how existing authorities and CNCS programs can be used to enter into interagency and public-private partnerships that allow for meaningful national service and volunteering opportunities, including participating in AmeriCorps, and help the agency achieve its mission; (ii) work with CNCS to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of such partnerships; and (iii) work with CNCS to identify ways in which the agency's national service participants and volunteers can develop transferable skills, and also how national service can serve as a pipeline to employment inside and outside the Federal Government. (b) Where practicable, agencies may consider entering into interagency agreements with CNCS to share program development and funding responsibilities, as authorized under 42 U.S.C. 12571(b)(1). Sec. 4. Recruitment of National Service Participants in the Civilian Career Services. In order to provide national service participants a means to pursue additional opportunities to continue their public service through career civilian service, the Office of Personnel Management shall, within 120 days of the date of this memorandum, issue guidance to agencies on developing and improving Federal recruitment strategies for participants in national service.
  • 40. 4 Sec. 5. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this memorandum shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect: (i) the authority granted by law or Executive Order to an agency, or the head thereof; or (ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals. (b) This memorandum shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations. (c) This memorandum is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person. (d) The Chief Executive Officer of CNCS is hereby authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the Federal Register. BARACK OBAMA # # #
  • 41. THE PRESIDENT’S CALL TO ACTION On July 15, President Obama issued a Presidential Memorandum that establishes the Task Force on Expanding National Service. The Task Force consists of representatives of 13 cabinet departments, six additional federal agencies and offices, and other agencies to be designated. Wendy Spencer, the CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service, and Cecilia Muñoz, the Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, will co-chair the Task Force. THE GOALS OF THE TASK FORCE Task Force members will: • Develop opportunities for interagency agreements between CNCS and other federal agencies, • Recommend ways to coordinate volunteering and service programs across the federal government, and • Identify public-private partnerships to expand national service. THE WAYS CNCS CAN HELP OTHER AGENCIES CNCS is a federal agency that engages more than five million Americans in service through AmeriCorps, Senior Corps, and its other programs and initiatives, including the President’s call to service, United We Serve. More than 80,000 AmeriCorps members and 360,000 Senior Corps volunteers tackle the most pressing challenges facing America: educating millions of students for jobs of the 21st century; supporting individuals, families, and neighborhoods on the road to economic recovery; supporting veterans and military families; helping communities rebuild after natural disasters; improving at-risk ecosystems; and providing healthy futures for children across the country. CNCS is already working closely with other federal agencies to leverage national service to meet their needs. The Task Force will accelerate those efforts and open the door to new partnerships. An Opportunity to Address Our Nation’s Greatest Needs
  • 42. FEMA CORPS, a partnership between the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Corporation for National and Community Service, is a new 1,600 member AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps program solely devoted to disaster response and recovery. FEMA Corps members provided invaluable service in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy and recent tornadoes in the Midwest and have developed innovative ways to serve disaster survivors – all while saving taxpayer dollars. SCHOOL TURNAROUND AMERICORPS, a partnership between the Department of Education and CNCS, will bring more than 650 new AmeriCorps members into the nation’s lowest- performing schools to support and sustain turnaround efforts. These AmeriCorps members will work to boost student academic achievement, attendance, high school graduation rates, and college and career readiness. This initiative will maximize the Department of Education’s existing investment in the School Improvement Grant (SIG) program. STEM AMERICORPS, which President Obama announced at the White House Science Fair this spring, is a multi-year initiative to place hundreds of AmeriCorps members in nonprofits across the country. These members will mobilize STEM professionals to inspire young people to excel in science, technology, engineering, and math. This will in turn build the pipeline for future STEM careers. STEM AmeriCorps builds on the President’s “Educate to Innovate,” a nationwide effort to move American students from the middle to the top of the pack in science and math achievement over the next decade. National Service Partnerships in Action
  • 43. CAPACITY BUILDING DIRECT SERVICE: TEAM-BASED DIRECT SERVICE: GRANT PROGRAMS Description of Service AmeriCorps members or Senior Corps volunteers work with organizations to provide community support and organization. Members may coordinate volunteers, but are not actual service providers. For example, members would recruit volunteer tutors rather than tutor children directly. AmeriCorps members serve in teams to accomplish service projects that range in length from four weeks to 10 months. Projects could include restoring trails, tutoring children, or building homes for low-income residents. AmeriCorps members or Senior Corps volunteers serve with non-profit organizations and community partners (e.g. Habitat for Humanity, City Year, YouthBuild, Jumpstart, etc.) to address community needs. Example of Existing Partnership STEM AmeriCorps members will serve with nonprofits across the country to mobilize STEM professionals to help young people excel in science, technology, engineering, and math. FEMA Corps is a partnership between the Federal Emergency Management Agency and CNCS. It is a team-based program that places members around the country to provide critical support after disasters and develop the next generation of emergency managers. School Turnaround AmeriCorps is a partnership between the Department of Education and CNCS that places members with grantee partners at the nation’s lowest performing schools where they will work to boost student achievement, attendance, and graduation rates. Applicable CNCS Programs • AmeriCorps State and National • AmeriCorps NCCC • AmeriCorps VISTA • Senior Corps - RSVP • AmeriCorps State and National • AmeriCorps NCCC • AmeriCorps VISTA – Summer Associate • AmeriCorps State and National • Senior Corps - RSVP Average Timeline (From identifying agency priority to getting boots on the ground) • Three months to one year • Three to six months • Three months to one year How long does a member serve? • Four weeks to one year • Four weeks to 10 months • As long as one year (part-time or full-time capacity) Length of Partnership • Four weeks to three years • Eight weeks to three years • Three years Will revise this timeline to reflect the entire process (incl. agency planning, then IAA, then boots) Ways We Can Help: Our Program Models
  • 44. Slide 1 Partnerships to Expand National Service How To Create Opportunity, Increase Efficiency, and Achieve Your Mission This PowerPoint presentation provides added context for the Task Force on Expanding National Service. It will give you an overview of how to use national service to achieve your mission, and can serve as a resource for your staff to learn and share key information. [Additional introductory content here]
  • 45. Slide 2 Agenda • Task Force Overview • Interagency Partnerships • Introduction to CNCS • This presentation will provide background and context for the Task Force on Expanding National Service. • We’ll look at several examples of successful partnerships. • You’ll get a simplified explanation of how to work with the Corporation for National and Community Service to achieve the President’s goals. • And we’ll introduce you to CNCS and its major initiatives.
  • 46. Slide 3 Task Force Overview
  • 47. Slide 4 Task Force Announcement And today I want to announce a new task force […] to take a fresh look at how we can better support national service – in particular, on some of our most important national priorities: improving schools, recovering from disasters and mentoring our kids. -- President Obama, July 15, 2013 • Building on a longstanding tradition of bipartisan support for national service and volunteerism, President Obama issued a Presidential Memorandum that establishes an interagency Task Force led by the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), at an event honoring President George H.W. Bush for his life of service. • The Task Force will develop strategies to expand national service to meet national needs through collaboration with other Federal agencies and the private sector, and; is the latest in a series of actions the Administration has taken over the past four years to expand opportunities for Americans to serve, focus service on pressing challenges. • Among other activities, the Task Force will make recommendations on polices to expand national service opportunities, recommend ways to coordinate volunteering and service programs across the Federal government, develop opportunities for interagency agreements between CNCS and other federal agencies, and identify public-private partnerships to expand national service. • Over the next six months, agencies participating on the Task Force will confer with CNCS about potential partnerships to engage more Americans in national service to solve problems and advance agency priorities. • By creating new interagency and public-private partnerships for national service, the President’s action will engage more Americans in results-driven service, expand economic and educational opportunities for those who serve, enhance Federal
  • 48. agencies’ capacity to achieve their missions, more efficiently use tax dollars, and build the pipeline of Americans ready to enter public service.
  • 49. Slide 5 Task Force Partners • Co-chaired by the CEO of CNCS, Wendy Spencer and the Director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, Cecilia Muñoz, the National Service Task Force partners include the following 17 agencies and offices (and other agencies to be designated): the Department of Defense the Department of Justice the Department of the Interior the Department of Agriculture the Department of Commerce the Department of Labor the Department of Health and Human Services the Department of Housing and Urban Development the Department of Transportation the Department of Energy the Department of Education the Department of Veterans Affairs the Department of Homeland Security the Peace Corps the National Science Foundation the Office of Personnel Management the Environmental Protection Agency
  • 50. Slide 6 Interagency Partnerships
  • 51. Slide 7 Partnerships and Growth Agency logo Placeholder • Solve Problems • Increase Efficiency • Achieve Priorities • Create Opportunities When you partner with national service, you get a cost-effective, human-capital solution that builds pathways to opportunity and helps achieve your agency’s mission. We help you: • Achieve priorities • Create opportunities • Solve problems • Increase efficiency Goals of partnerships: • Create partnerships to grow national service • Inspire innovation in the national service field • Work cross-sector to address critical national and local needs • Generate innovative funding models that leverages and fosters effective use of tax- payer and private dollars • Ensure accountability and collective impact through evidence-based program selection and measured growth Some examples of our partnership program models demonstrate how a federal agency has identified a clear problem for which national service can provide a solution.
  • 52. Slide 8 How You Can Partner With Us • How can national service help meet your agency’s mission? • New corps for “capacity-building” or “boots on the ground” Three Program Models: • Capacity Building • Direct Service: Team-Based • Direct Service: Grant Programs • Expand policies or practices within your agency to support national service • [Provide examples tailored to each agency] • There are things you can do today to support national service: • Example: Dept. of Ed. match letter
  • 53. Slide 9 Direct Service: Team-Based Description of Service AmeriCorps members serve in teams to accomplish service projects that range in length from four weeks to 10 months. Projects could include restoring trails, tutoring children, or building homes for low-income residents. Applicable CNCS Programs AmeriCorps State and National AmeriCorps NCCC AmeriCorps VISTA – Summer Associate Average Timeline (From identifying agency priority to getting boots on the ground) Three months to one year Three to six months Three months to one year How long does a member serve? Four weeks to one year Four weeks to 10 months As long as one year (part-time or full-time capacity) Length of Partnership Four weeks to three years Eight weeks to three years Three years
  • 54. Slide 10 FEMA Corps Example of Existing Partnership FEMA Corps is a partnership between the Federal Emergency Management Agency and CNCS. It is a team-based program that places members around the country to provide critical support after disasters and develop the next generation of emergency managers. • In the Spring of 2013, CNCS partnered with FEMA to announce the creation of a new program designed to strengthen the nation's ability to respond to and recover from disasters while expanding career opportunities for young people. • FEMA Corps is a new 1,600-member program of AmeriCorps NCCC solely devoted to disaster response and recovery. • FEMA Corps strengthens disaster capacity, prepares young people for emergency management careers, and saves significant taxpayer dollars. • FEMA Corps members provided invaluable service in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy and recent tornadoes in the Midwest and have developed innovative ways to serve disaster survivors. • President Obama recently recognized FEMA Corps in his remarks presenting the new management agenda, stating: “For example, until recently, when a natural disaster struck, teams from FEMA had to rely exclusively on in-person inspections to figure out which families needed help. Now they analyze satellite and aerial imagery and get housing assistance to areas that need it
  • 55. most, more quickly. After Hurricane Sandy, most folks were able to sign up for assistance using FEMA’s mobile and web apps -- updating and checking the status of their applications. And FEMA agents went door-to-door in some areas with iPads, helping residents who had lost power and Internet access sign up for disaster relief without leaving their homes. So making sure that we’re delivering services better, faster, more efficiently.”
  • 56. Slide 11 Direct Service: Grant Programs Description of Service AmeriCorps members or Senior Corps volunteers serve with non-profit organizations and community partners (e.g. Habitat for Humanity, City Year, YouthBuild, Jumpstart, etc.) to address community needs. Applicable CNCS Programs AmeriCorps State and National Senior Corps - RSVP Average Timeline (From identifying agency priority to getting boots on the ground) TBD: Three months to one year How long does a member serve? As long as one year (part-time or full-time capacity) Length of Partnership Three years
  • 57. Slide 12 School Turnaround AmeriCorps Example of Existing Partnership School Turnaround AmeriCorps is a partnership between the Department of Education and CNCS that places members with grantee partners at the nation’s lowest performing schools where they will work to boost student achievement, attendance, and graduation rates. • In February, 2013, CNCS CEO Wendy Spencer joined U.S. Sec. of Education Arne Duncan to announce School Turnaround AmeriCorps, a new competitive grant program to reinforce and accelerate intervention efforts in the nation’s lowest- performing schools. • School Turnaround AmeriCorps is a partnership between the Department of Education and AmeriCorps that will bring more than 650 new AmeriCorps members into some of our lowest-performing schools this fall, where they will work to boost student academic achievement, attendance, high school graduation rates, and college and career readiness. • In July 2013, the first School Turnaround AmeriCorps grants were announced, with $15 million over three years going to 13 organizations in 70 urban and rural communities across the country. • School Turnaround AmeriCorps will leverage an anticipated $18 million in grantee match funding in addition to the $15 million in federal funds during a three-year cycle. The 13 awardees were selected from 66 applicants from around the country.
  • 58. Slide 13 Capacity Building Description of Service AmeriCorps members or Senior Corps volunteers work with organizations to provide community support and organization. Members may coordinate volunteers, but are not actual service providers. For example, members would recruit volunteer tutors rather than tutor children directly. Applicable CNCS Programs AmeriCorps State and National AmeriCorps NCCC AmeriCorps VISTA Senior Corps - RSVP Average Timeline (From identifying agency priority to getting boots on the ground) TBD How long does a member serve? Four weeks to one year Length of Partnership Four weeks to three years
  • 59. Slide 14 STEM AmeriCorps Example of Existing Partnership STEM AmeriCorps members will serve with nonprofits across the country to mobilize STEM professionals to help young people excel in science, technology, engineering, and math. • STEM AmeriCorps, which President Obama announced at the White House Science Fair this spring, is a multi-year initiative to place hundreds of AmeriCorps members in nonprofits across the country to mobilize STEM professionals to inspire young people to excel in science, technology, engineering, and math to build the pipeline for future STEM careers. • In the first phase, CNCS will place 50 full-time AmeriCorps members with FIRST® (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology), a nonprofit founded by inventor Dean Kamen to inspire an appreciation of science and technology in young people through robotics competitions. • The AmeriCorps members will serve in low-income communities across the country. They will recruit volunteers and support teams of students to participate in FIRST competitions, making it possible for more students to be exposed to the STEM fields. • Through a grant competition in late 2013, CNCS will provide funding to hundreds of STEM-focused AmeriCorps members across the country. AmeriCorps members will recruit and support thousands of STEM professionals to volunteer through in-school, after-school, and other academic programs. To maximize this opportunity, CNCS will
  • 60. pursue partnerships with both the private sector and other federal agencies.
  • 61. Slide 15 About CNCS
  • 62. Slide 16 Who We Are $850 million leveraged 5 million Americans 70,000 locations • The Corporation for National and Community Service is a federal agency that engages more than five million Americans in service through its AmeriCorps, Senior Corps, Social Innovation Fund, and Volunteer Generation Fund programs, and leads the President's national call to service initiative, United We Serve. • National service engages citizen volunteers in problem-solving, uses competition to fund high-value programs, leverages substantial outside support, and mobilizes volunteers to multiply impact. CNCS programs annually mobilize 5 million volunteers and leverage hundreds of millions of dollars of non-CNCS resources from business, foundations, and other sources. • CNCS is already working with other federal agencies to leverage national service to meet national needs. The Presidential Memorandum will accelerate those efforts and open the door to new partnerships. Expanding upon its existing system of private sector matching, CNCS is also actively reaching out to corporations, foundations, and other funders to secure additional support for national service.
  • 63. Slide 17 Our Focus Areas Disaster Services Economic Opportunity Education Environmental Stewardship Healthy Futures Veterans and Military Families • With bipartisan Congressional support, the President has worked with CNCS to focus service on pressing social problems; expand opportunities for more Americans of all ages and backgrounds to serve; build the capacity of individuals, nonprofits, and communities; and embrace social innovation. • CNCS recognizes that national service will have its greatest impact if we target resources on a core set of critical problems and carefully measure our progress and prioritizes six major challenges facing communities: disaster services, economic opportunity, education, environmental stewardship, healthy futures, and veterans and military families.
  • 64. Slide 18 Our Programs • AmeriCorps provides opportunities for more than 80,000 Americans each year to give intensive service to their communities and country through three programs: AmeriCorps (grants), AmeriCorps VISTA, and AmeriCorps NCCC (National Civilian Community Corps). • AmeriCorps members tutor and mentor youth, build affordable housing, assist veterans and military families, provide health services, run after-school programs, help communities respond to disasters, and build the capacity of nonprofit groups to become self-sustaining, among many other activities. • AmeriCorps members in recent years have stepped up their role in recruiting, training, and managing volunteers of all ages and backgrounds, supporting 3.4 million community volunteers in 2011 alone. • In exchange for a year of full-time service, members earn a Segal AmeriCorps Education Award that can be used to pay for college or graduate school, or to pay back qualified student loans. Since 1994, more than 800,000 Americans have given 1 billion hours of service through AmeriCorps.
  • 65. Slide 19 Our Programs • Each year Senior Corps taps the skills, talents, and experience of more than 330,000 Americans age 55 and older to meet a wide range of community challenges through three programs: RSVP, the Foster Grandparent Program, and the Senior Companion Program. • RSVP volunteers help local police departments conduct safety patrols, participate in environmental projects, provide intensive educational services to children and adults, and respond to natural disasters, among many other activities. • Foster Grandparents serve one-on-one as tutors and mentors to young people with special needs. • Senior Companions help homebound seniors and other adults maintain independence in their own homes.
  • 66. Slide 20 Our Programs Social Innovation Fund • The Social Innovation Fund represents a new approach by the federal government to address urgent national challenges. • As part of the Administration’s innovation agenda, CNCS launched the Social Innovation Fund, a unique model that improves the lives of people in low-income communities and expands the impact of high-performing organizations using evidence-based practices. • In its first three years, the Social Innovation Fund has invested in 200 nonprofit organizations in 34 states and Washington, DC and served more than 174,000 individuals. Through its unique 3 to 1 match structure, it has attracted commitments of more than $350 million in private and non-federal funds.
  • 67. Slide 21 Our Programs Volunteer Generation Fund 19 states • CNCS strengthens the impact of America’s volunteers by bringing more individuals into service and building the capacity of nonprofits to effectively manage volunteers. • That’s why CNCS is thrilled that the President’s FY 2014 budget requests a significant increase in the Volunteer Generation Fund, a CNCS program to strengthen volunteer management practices, and proposes renaming the program the George H.W. Bush Volunteer Generation Fund. • CNCS also leads national days of service: in particular, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service and the September 11th National Day of Service and Remembrance. Annually, these events provide opportunities for 760,000 volunteers to serve every year. • In June 2009, CNCS joined with the White House to launch United We Serve, a challenge to all Americans to engage in sustained, meaningful community service to help in our nation's renewal and recovery. Americans have responded enthusiastically to the President's call, joining with friends and neighbors to replenish food banks, support veterans and military families, restore public lands, and more. • The Administration worked with technology leaders to develop a volunteer matching tool for the Serve.gov website featuring more than 250,000 volunteer opportunities, and teamed up with top sports stars and celebrities to promote volunteer service.
  • 68. Slide 22 Our Grantees • CNCS programs provide grants to some of the nation’s leading nonprofits, including familiar names like the American Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity, Big Brothers Big Sisters, and more.
  • 69. Slide 23 Our Corporate Supporters • Most organizations who receive CNCS grants are required to obtain matching funds with non-CNCS resources, which often includes private sector and corporate entities. • In addition, CNCS has found opportunities to sponsor with its corporate supporters in other ways. For example: • Time Warner, Southwest Airlines, and Shell also supported AmeriCorps response efforts in Hurricane Sandy-affected New York and New Jersey. • Google is financing an AmeriCorps program designed to help nonprofits effectively use technology to further their missions. • And Bank of America has enlisted AmeriCorps members to support financial literacy efforts.
  • 70. Slide 24 Discuss Partnership This slide will include appropriate CNCS contact information.
  • 71. Corporation for National and Community Service Fact Sheet The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) improves lives, strengthens communities, and fosters civic engagement through service and volunteering. As the nation's largest grant maker in support of service and volunteering, CNCS engages more than five million Americans of all ages and backgrounds in service to their communities each year through Senior Corps, AmeriCorps, the Volunteer Generation Fund, the Social Innovation Fund (SIF), and other programs, and leads President Obama’s call to service initiative, United We Serve. Participants in CNCS programs and the community volunteers they help coordinate enable tens of thousands of national and local nonprofit organizations, faith-based groups, schools, and municipal agencies to solve tough problems and meet local needs in education, health, the environment, veterans, economic opportunity, and other critical areas. AmeriCorps AmeriCorps provides opportunities for among many other activities. AmeriCorps 80,000 Americans each year to give members in recent years have stepped up intensive service to their communities their role in recruiting, training, and and country through three programs: managing volunteers of all ages and AmeriCorps State and National, backgrounds, supporting 4 million AmeriCorps VISTA, and AmeriCorps community volunteers in 2012 alone. In NCCC (National Civilian Community exchange for a year of full-time service, Corps). AmeriCorps members tutor and members earn a Segal AmeriCorps mentor youth, build affordable housing, Education Award that can be used to pay assist veterans and military families, for college or graduate school, or to pay provide health services, run after-school back qualified student loans. Since 1994, programs, help communities respond to more than 820,000 Americans have given disasters, and build the capacity of non- 1 billion hours of service through profit groups to become self-sustaining, AmeriCorps. Senior Corps Each year Senior Corps taps the skills, talents, and experience of more than 360,000 Americans age 55 and older to meet a wide range of community challenges through three programs: RSVP, the Foster Grandparent Program, and the Senior Companion Program. RSVP volunteers help local police depart­ ments conduct safety patrols, participate in environmental projects, provide intensive educational services to children and adults, and respond to natural disasters, among many other activities. Foster Grandparents serve one-on-one as tutors and mentors to young people with special needs. Senior Companions help homebound seniors and other adults maintain independence in their own homes. ■ Nation’s largest grant- maker for service and volunteering ■ Participants serve at 70,000 service locations ■ Engages nearly 5 million Americans in service each year • More than 360,000 Senior Corps volunteers • 80,000 AmeriCorps members ■ Leverages more than $800 million in outside funding and donations each year ■ Leads President’s United We Serve initiative 1201 New York Ave., NW Washington, DC 20525 202-606-5000 NationalService.gov
  • 72. Social Innovation Fund The Social Innovation Fund represents a new approach by the federal government to address urgent national challenges. Its function is to mobilize public and private resources to grow the impact of promising, innovative community-based solutions that have evidence of compelling results in three areas of priority need: economic opportunity, healthy futures and youth development. In its first three competitions, the Social Innovation Fund has awarded $137 million to 20 intermediary grantmakers, which have made subgrants to nearly 200 subgrantees in 34 states and the District of Columbia, reaching over 174,000 individuals and will continue to impact tens of thousands more. With its unique public-private partnership structure, the Social Innovation Fund has already generated commitments of $360 million in non-federal resources. Other Programs and Initiatives ■ The Volunteer Generation Fund strengthens the nation’s civic infrastructure by helping nonprofits recruit, manage, and support more volunteers. ■ The September 11th National Day of Service and Remembrance offers Americans the opportunity to honor victims, survivors, and those who rose up in service on September 11, 2001 through charitable service. ■ The King Day of Service supports community organizations in their efforts to engage local citizens in service on the Martin Luther King, Jr. federal holiday. ■ The President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll honors colleges and universities for the commitment of their students, faculty, and staff to community service. ■ The National Service Knowledge Network provides training and resources to national service programs and nonprofits seeking to expand their capacity and impact. ■ The CNCS annual Volunteering and Civic Life in America report provides comprehensive data to state and local leaders to help them expand the impact of service. Service as a Solution President Barack Obama is deeply committed to advancing the role of service in addressing our national challenges and in making service part of the life of every American. With bipartisan Congressional support, the President has worked with CNCS to focus service on pressing social problems; expand opportunities for more Americans of all ages and backgrounds to serve; build the capacity of individuals, nonprofits, and communities; and embrace social innovation. The agency’s 2011-2015 Strategic Plan builds on the strong foundation of national service that has developed over the past four decades and the vision set forth in the bipartisan Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act of 2009. The plan recognizes that national service will have its greatest impact if we target resources on a core set of critical problems and carefully measure our progress. It prioritizes six major challenges facing communities: disaster services, economic opportunity, education, environmental stewardship, healthy futures, and veterans and military families. It also provides strategies and performance measures which determine how we will evaluate our success over the coming years. United We Serve In June 2009, CNCS joined with the White House to launch United We Serve, a challenge to all Americans to engage in sustained, meaningful community service to help in our nation's renewal and recovery. Americans have responded enthusiastically to the President's call, joining with friends and neighbors to replenish food banks, support veterans and military families, restore public lands, and more. The Administration has worked with technology leaders to develop a volunteer matching tool for the Serve.gov website featuring more than 250,000 volunteer opportunities, and teamed up with top sports stars and celebrities to promote volunteer service. June 2013 1201 New York Ave., NW ★ Washington, DC 20525 ★ 202-606-5000 NationalService.gov
  • 73. AmeriCorps Fact Sht Jan 2013_SeniorCorpsFSFnl 6/6/2013 2:38 PM Page 1 Fact Sheet Annual Statistical Highlights ■ Engages more than 75,000 members annually ■ Members serve at 15,000 locations across the country ■ Mobilizes 4 million volunteers annually ■ Leverages $480 million in outside funding and donations each year 1201 New York Ave., NW Washington, DC 20525 202-606-5000 AmeriCorps.gov AmeriCorps AmeriCorps engages more than 75,000 men and women in intensive service each year at more than 15,000 locations including nonprofits, schools, public agencies, and community and faith-based groups across the country. AmeriCorps members help communities tackle pressing problems while mobilizing millions of volunteers for the organizations they serve. Members gain valuable professional, educational, and life benefits, and the experience has a lasting impact on the members and the communities they serve. AmeriCorps consists of three main programs: AmeriCorps State and National, whose members serve with national and local nonprofit and community groups; AmeriCorps VISTA, through which members serve full time fighting poverty; and AmeriCorps NCCC (National Civilian Community Corps), a team-based residential program for young adults 18-24 who carry out projects in public safety, the environment, youth development, and disaster relief and preparedness. Focus on Impact The bipartisan Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act focused AmeriCorps’ efforts in six key areas: disaster services, economic opportunity, education, environmental stewardship, healthy futures, and veterans and military families. To strengthen accountability, AmeriCorps programs are required to demonstrate their impact using standard performance measures. AmeriCorps members make our communities safer, stronger, healthier, and improve the lives of tens of millions of our most vulnerable citizens. AmeriCorps’ impacts are proven and measurable. Disaster services: In response to the tornado that struck Joplin, Missouri on May 22nd, 2011, AmeriCorps teams organized a large-scale volunteer response center that recruited and supervised more than 75,000 volunteers. Through the AmeriCorps-led operation, unaffiliated volunteers contributed more than 579,000 hours of service. These hours completely defrayed over $17.7 million in emergency match dollars owed by the City of Joplin to the federal government at the conclusion of the response. Economic opportunity: VISTA, AmeriCorps’ poverty-fighting program, engages more than 8,000 members each year in fighting poverty by creating businesses, expanding access to technology, recruiting volunteers to teach literacy, and strengthening antipoverty groups. Education: AmeriCorps places thousands of teachers, tutors, and mentors into low- performing schools, helping students succeed in school and gain skills necessary to get 21st century jobs. Environmental stewardship: Members build trails, restore parks, protect water­ sheds, run recycling programs, and promote energy efficiency, weatherization, and clean energy.
  • 74. AmeriCorps Fact Sht Jan 2013_SeniorCorpsFSFnl 6/6/2013 2:38 PM Page 2 Healthy futures: AmeriCorps members save lives Veterans and military families: AmeriCorps supports through HIV/AIDS education and outreach, drug and the military community by engaging veterans in service, alcohol prevention training, and connecting poor helping veterans readjust to civilian life, and providing families to health clinics and services. support to military families. Strengthening Nonprofits and the Volunteer Sector Strengthening nonprofits: AmeriCorps members help faith-based and community groups expand services, build capacity, raise funds, develop new partnerships, and create innovative, sustainable programs. Encouraging competition and local control: AmeriCorps pushes funding and decision-making to the state and local level. Most grantees are chosen by bipartisan state commissions appointed by the governor. Advancing social innovation: AmeriCorps invests in entrepreneurial organizations that have been recognized for their innovative approaches to citizen problem-solving such as Teach for America, City Year, YouthBuild, JumpStart, Citizen Schools, and Experience Corps. Expanding Educational Opportunity and Building Future Leaders Expanding educational opportunity: In exchange for a year of full-time service, AmeriCorps members earn a Segal AmeriCorps Education Award (equal to the maximum Pell Grant) that helps pay for college or pay back student loans. AmeriCorps members have earned more than $2.4 billion in these awards since 1994. Preparing the 21st Century Workforce: AmeriCorps is a pathway to economic opportunity that provides members with valuable skills specific to their service (construction, teaching, weatherization, etc.) as well as general skills of leadership and problem-solving that all employers are looking for. Creating future leaders: AmeriCorps members gain new and useful skills, advance their education, and become more connected to their communities. A longitudinal study has shown that AmeriCorps alumni are more likely to be civically engaged, to go into public service careers—such as teaching, public safety, social work, and military service—and to volunteer in their communities. Leveraging a Powerful Return on the Investment Public private partnerships: AmeriCorps leverages substantial private investment—more than $480 million in non-CNCS funds each year from businesses, foundations, and other sources. AmeriCorps has cut costs and become more efficient by supporting more members with fewer federal dollars. Mobilizing volunteers: AmeriCorps is a powerful catalyst and force-multiplier for community volunteering. Last year AmeriCorps members recruited, trained, and supervised more than 4 million community volunteers for the organizations they serve. AmeriCorps Fast Facts 800,000 Number of people who have served as AmeriCorps members since 1994. 1 billion Total number of hours served by AmeriCorps members since 1994. 5.2 million Number of disadvantaged youth tutored, mentored, or served by AmeriCorps members in fiscal 2011. 4 million Number of community volunteers managed or mobilized by AmeriCorps members in fiscal 2011. $480 million Value of cash and in-kind donations leveraged by AmeriCorps members in fiscal 2010. 15,000 Number of AmeriCorps service locations in 2012. $2.4 billion Total amount of Segal AmeriCorps Education Awards earned by AmeriCorps members since 1994. June 2013 1201 New York Ave., NW ★ Washington, DC 20525 ★ 202-606-5000 AmeriCorps.gov
  • 75. AmeriCorps NCCC 1201 New York Ave., NW Washington, DC 20525 202-606-5000 AmeriCorps.gov/nccc Fact Sheet AmeriCorps NCCC (National Civilian Community Corps) is a full-time, team-based residential service program for individuals ages 18-24. NCCC members are organized into 10-12 member teams and serve in local communities in all 50 states and U.S. territories. The mission of AmeriCorps NCCC is to strengthen communities and develop leaders through team-based national and community service. Based out of five regional campuses in Maryland, Mississippi, Iowa, Colorado, and California, teams of members complete 6-8 week intensive national service, doing projects proposed by community sponsors who identify needs within their communities and request NCCC assistance. Project sponsors include national, community and faith-based nonprofit organizations; municipal and state governments; federal agencies and programs; city, state, and national parks; Native American communities; and schools throughout the United States. Natural and Other Disasters Natural and Other Disaster projects address the needs of communities affected by floods, hurricanes, wildfires and other disasters. The focus is on preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery projects. Infrastructure Improvement Infrastructure Improvement projects contribute to the safety and well-being of community members through repairing and building structures. In addition, projects will improve basic facilities and services needed for the functioning of the community. Environmental Stewardship and Conservation In the tradition of the Civilian Conservation Corps of the 1930s, Environmental Stewardship and Conservation projects help preserve and enhance a community’s natural resources. NCCC Team Service Areas Annual Statistical Highlights* ■ Constructed, renovated, or weatherized 1,000 homes ■ Served 125,000 meals, including 85,000 meals in disaster areas ■ Supported 30,000 students in out of school programs ■ Planted 438,000 trees and native plants ■ Restored 17 miles of streams and rivers ■ Assisted 7,436,692 people in disaster areas ■ Recruited or coordinated 659,233 volunteers ■ Constructed or restored 8,738 miles of trail ■ Removed 21,532 tons of debris or vegetation Since 2000, AmeriCorps NCCC teams have: *These reflect the accomplishments of 1,200 NCCC members during the 1.5 million hours they served in FY 2011 (Oct 1 – Sept 30, 2011)
  • 76. 1201 New York Ave., NW ★ Washington, DC 20525 ★ 202-606-5000 AmeriCorps.gov/nccc February 2012 Energy Conservation Energy Conservation projects promote energy efficient practices with organizations, communities, families, or individuals. Urban and Rural Development Urban and Rural Development projects address the special needs of communities in ways that improve the quality of life for citizens and the success of whole communities. Become an AmeriCorps NCCC Member AmeriCorps NCCC is open to all U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents ages 18-24. NCCC is the experience of a lifetime! Member benefits include room and board, living allowance, health benefits, Segal AmeriCorps Education Award of $5,500*, student loan deferment, training, uniforms and gear. To apply to be a member: please visit americorps.gov/nccc for more information Become an AmeriCorps NCCC Sponsor NCCC provides a team of approximately 10 members who arrive with their own transportation, are supervised by a team leader, to help accomplish project goals and objectives defined by the sponsor. There is no direct charge or match required to receive a NCCC team, but sponsoring organizations are asked to provide: lodging, assistance with food costs, on-site technical supervision, materials and tools, and support for service learning. To apply to be a project sponsor, please visit americorps.gov/nccc for more information. Corporation for National and Community Service AmeriCorps NCCC, was implemented by the federal government in 1994, and is a program of the Corporation for National and Community Service, the federal agency that improves lives, strengthens communities, and fosters civic engagement through service and volunteering. *The Segal AmeriCorps Education Award will be equal to the amount of the Pell Grant. Check AmeriCorps.gov for updated amount.
  • 77. vista fact sheet June 2013_SeniorCorpsFSFnl 6/6/2013 2:46 PM Page 1 Fact Sheet AmeriCorps VISTA AmeriCorps VISTA (Volunteers In Service To America) taps the skills, talents, and passion of more than 8,000 Americans annually to support community efforts to overcome poverty. The program's nationwide corps of VISTAs commits full-time for a year at nonprofit organizations or local government agencies to build the capacity of these organizations to carry out programs that tackle poverty. VISTAs recruit and manage community volunteers, raise funds, and help manage projects. VISTAs support programs that improve literacy, expand job opportunities, develop financial assets, reduce homelessness, and improve health services. They also support programs that increase housing opportunities, increase economic opportunities for low-income veterans and military families, and expand access to technology for those living in rural and urban areas of poverty across America. Core Principles of AmeriCorps VISTA Anti-Poverty Focus: AmeriCorps VISTA supports community efforts to overcome poverty. Any nonprofit organization, educational institution, or tribal or public agency with a project explicitly designed to alleviate poverty may sponsor a VISTA. Community Empowerment: AmeriCorps VISTA values the inherent strengths and resources of the community. VISTA expects project sponsors to involve residents of the community in planning, developing, and implementing the VISTA project. This approach allows low-income individuals the freedom to speak for themselves in determining the projects that suit their specific needs. ■ AmeriCorps VISTAs 5,958 ■ Summer Associates 2,207 ■ Hours served by VISTAs 12.6 million ■ VISTA projects 1,132 ■ Value of cash and in-kind resources raised $170.1 million ■ Annual Federal Funding $94.81 million AmeriCorps VISTA Statistical Highlights* * Statistics are for fiscal year 2012 Annual Statistical Highlights* ■ Community Volunteers Recruited and Managed by VISTAs 1.1 million ■ Hours Served by Community Volunteers 11.7 million ■ Veterans and Military Families served 115,000 ■ Veterans and Military Family Members Engaged as Community Volunteers 12,610 ■ Disadvantaged Youth Receiving Services 2.5 million 1201 New York Ave., NW Washington, DC 20525 202-606-5000 www.AmeriCorps.gov
  • 78. vista fact sheet June 2013_SeniorCorpsFSFnl 6/6/2013 2:46 PM Page 2 Capacity Building: AmeriCorps VISTA expands the ability of sponsor organizations to fight poverty. VISTAs strengthen and support organizations by building infrastructure, expanding community partnerships, securing long-term resources, coordinating training for participants, and much more. These capacity-building activities enable organizations to provide better services to low-income individuals and communities. Sustainable Solutions: VISTAs serve as a short- term resource to help sponsor organizations achieve lasting solutions to poverty. Become an AmeriCorps VISTA AmeriCorps VISTA is open to U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents age 18 and older. VISTAs choose from projects throughout the country, based on their skills and interests, and serve full time for one year with community-based organizations. During their service, VISTAs receive a living allowance, as well as health care, child care, training, relocation expenses, and liability insurance. After a successful year of service, VISTAs receive either a $1,500 stipend or a Segal AmeriCorps Education Award equal to the maximum amount of the federal Pell Grant. The award can be used to pay for educational expenses at qualified institutions of higher education, or to pay back qualified student loans. For VISTA service approved in fiscal year 2013, the education award is $5,550.* Find out more at AmeriCorps.gov Or call 800-942-2677 TTY 800-833-3722 Sponsor a Project Any nonprofit organization or public agency involved in alleviating poverty may partner with AmeriCorps VISTA to develop a project and host VISTAs. Potential sponsors must have the capacity and commitment to recruit, train, supervise, and support VISTAs. View these additional resources at AmeriCorps.gov: • Guide to Becoming a VISTA Sponsor • VISTA 101: Understanding VISTA Contact the local CNCS State Office Or call 202-606-5000 TTY 202-565-2799 Email: vista@americorps.gov Corporation for National and Community Service AmeriCorps VISTA is an anti-poverty program created by the federal government in 1964. The first class of VISTAs began serving in 1965. In 1993, VISTA became part of AmeriCorps, a network of national and community service programs that annually engage more than 75,000 members in intensive service to meet critical needs in disaster services, economic opportunity, education, environmental stewardship, healthy futures, and veterans and military families. AmeriCorps is administered by the Corporation for National and Community Service, the federal agency that improves lives, strengthens communities, and fosters civic engagement through service and volunteering. Each year CNCS engages more than five million Americans of all ages and backgrounds in service to meet local needs through AmeriCorps, Senior Corps, the Social Innovation Fund, and other programs, and leads President Obama’s national call to service initiative, United We Serve. For more information on the Corporation, visit www.NationalService.gov.* Check AmeriCorps.gov for the annual updated amount. June 2013 1201 New York Ave., NW ★ Washington, DC 20525 ★ 202-606-5000 www.AmeriCorps.gov
  • 79. Fact Sheet Senior Corps Senior Corps taps the skills, talents, and experience of more than 362,000 Americans age 55 and over to meet a wide range of community challenges through three programs — RSVP, the Foster Grandparent Program, and the Senior Companion Program. RSVP volunteers recruit and manage other volunteers, participate in environmental projects, mentor and tutor children, and respond to natural disasters, among many other activities. Foster Grandparents serve one-on-one as tutors and mentors to young people with special needs. Senior Companions help frail seniors and other adults maintain independence primarily in the clients’ own homes. RSVP Established in 1971 and now one of the largest senior volunteer organizations in the nation, RSVP engages more than 296,000 people age 55 and older in a diverse range of volunteer activities. Volunteers tutor children, renovate homes, teach English to immigrants, assist victims of natural disasters, provide independent living services, recruit and manage other volunteers, and serve their communities in many other ways. RSVP volunteers choose how, where, and how often they want to serve, with commitments ranging from a few hours to 40 hours per week. Eligibility: RSVP is open to all people age 55 and over. Volunteers do not receive monetary incentives, but sponsor­ ing organizations may reimburse them for some costs incurred during service, including meals and transportation. Annual RSVP Statistical Highlights* ■ Volunteers 320,600 ■ Hours Served 47 million ■ Number of Projects 676 ■ Children Served 82,590 ■ Engaged 24,500 Veterans who serve as RSVP volunteers ■ Frail Elderly Served 742,800 ■ Non-Federal Support $37.5 million Annual Statistical Highlights* ■ Volunteers Total 362,000 ■ Hours Served 82 million ■ Frail Elderly Served 793,000 ■ Children Served 298,000 ■ Veterans Served 563,000 1201 New York Ave., NW Washington, DC 20525 202-606-5000 SeniorCorps.gov
  • 80. Foster Grandparent Program The Foster Grandparent Program (FGP), which began in 1965, provides loving and experienced tutors and mentors to children and youth with special needs. Working one-on-one and serving between 15 and 40 hours a week, Foster Grandparents provide support in schools, hospitals, drug treatment centers, correctional institutions, and child care centers. Among other activities, they review schoolwork, reinforce values, teach parenting skills to young par­ ents, and care for premature infants and children with disabilities. Foster Grandparents often maintain an ongoing, intensive relationship with the children and youth served for a year or longer. Eligibility: Volunteers must be 55 years of age or over. Those who meet certain income guidelines receive a small stipend. All FGP volunteers receive accident and liability insurance and meals while on duty, reimbursement for transportation, and monthly training. Senior Companion Program The Senior Companion Program (SCP), which began in 1974, helps frail seniors and other adults maintain independence primarily in the clients’ own homes. Senior Companions serve between 15 and 40 hours a week and typically serve between two and four clients. Among other activities, they assist with daily living tasks, such as grocery shopping and bill paying; provide friendship and companionship; alert doctors and family members to potential problems, and pro­ vide respite to family caregivers. Eligibility: Volunteers must be 55 years of age or over. Those who meet certain income guidelines receive a small stipend. All SCP volunteers receive accident and liability insurance and meals while on duty, reimbursement for transportation, and monthly training. Annual FGP Statistical Highlights* ■ Volunteers 28,250 ■ Hours Served 23.7 million ■ Young People Served 215,700 ■ Engaged 1,000 Veterans who serve as Foster Grandparents volunteers ■ Number of Children of Military Families Served 3,038 ■ Number of Projects 315 ■ Non-Federal Support $26 million Annual SCP Statistical Highlights* ■ Volunteers 13,770 ■ Hours Served 11.7 million ■ Clients Served 50,380 ■ Caregivers Given Respite 6,900 ■ Number of Projects 185 ■ Engaged 721 Veterans as Senior Companion volunteers ■ Non-Federal Support $16.7 million Corporation for National and Community Service The three Senior Corps programs were created by the federal government in the mid-1960s and early 1970s. Since 1993, they have been administered by the Corporation for National and Community Service, the federal agency that improves lives, strengthens communities and fosters civic engagement through service and volunteering. Each year CNCS engages more than five million Americans of all ages and backgrounds in service to meet local needs through its Senior Corps and AmeriCorps programs, and leads President Obama’s Call to Service initiative, United We Serve. For more information on CNCS, visit NationalService.gov. *STATISTICS NOTE: Data from FY2012. June 2013 1201 New York Ave., NW ★ Washington, DC 20525 ★ 202-606-5000 SeniorCorps.gov
  • 81. 1201 New York Ave., NW Washington, DC 20525 202-606-5000 NationalService.gov Every year, communities across the nation suffer the effects of natural and man-made disasters that disrupt the lives of millions of Americans. Disasters can lead to human losses, social problems, economic harm, and environmental damage. The very nature of a disaster leaves individuals and families with broken or stressed support networks to assist with response and recovery. The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), a federal agency, provides strong support, expertise, and trained and dedicated volunteers to help communities to prepare for, mitigate, respond, and recover from natural and man-made disasters. CNCS supports nonprofits, educational institutions, faith-based organizations and other groups in engaging citizens in meeting economic, health, social, and environmental needs caused by disasters. This includes a range of activities, such as volunteer coordination, feeding operations, home repairs, environmental clean up, needs assessments, client casework, and long-term recovery. From forest fires and floods, to hurricanes and tornadoes, to terror attacks and oil spills, participants in CNCS programs have provided critical support to millions of Americans affected by disasters since 1994. Reflecting the agency's growing expertise and commitment in disaster services, the CNCS board of directors made disaster services one the agency's focus areas for its 2011-2015 strategic plan. These activities cover the full range of disaster services from response, to long-term recovery, preparedness, and mitigation. National Service and Disaster Response To increase coordination at the federal, state, and local levels, CNCS has worked with the Department of Homeland Security and FEMA on the National Response Framework, created a Disaster Coordinator Cadre of specially trained staff available to go to disaster zones to coordinate national service assets and mission assignments with FEMA, and signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster to enable smarter, faster cooperation with the group's members. • Volunteer Coordination • Shelter Operations • Debris Removal • Warehouse Management • Installing Accessibility Improvements on Homes and Shelters • Case Management • Disaster Recovery Center Support • Volunteer Reception Center Support • Long-Term Recovery Committee Support • Volunteer Base Camp Setup and Operation • Public Information Outreach • Operations Center Setup and Support • Special Needs Assistance • Home Construction/Repair • Public Facilities Renovation • Call Center Support/Setup/Operations • Needs Assessment • Pet Shelter Operations • Preparedness Education Sample Disaster Project Activities Coordination and Planning “Among the many who wear the name "hero" in our book of golden deeds performed here, the AmeriCorps volunteers will forever have a place of honor in our memory - idealistic young people, and seniors also, who came here and lived in Spartan conditions for month after month, in military tents, going out day after day to help the people of South Mississippi pull themselves out of the debris and rebuild.” Biloxi Sun-Herald, Sept. 12, 2007
  • 82. 1201 New York Ave., NW ★ Washington, DC 20525 ★ 202-606-5000 NationalService.gov February 2012 National Service in Action Through its programs AmeriCorps (State & National, NCCC, and VISTA), Senior Corps, and Learn and Serve America, the Corporation for National and Community Service has responded to numerous natural and manmade disasters since 1994. Highlights include: ■ Hours after the nation’s deadliest tornado in 60 years struck Joplin, Missouri on May 22, 2011, AmeriCorps members arrived on the scene. Since then more than 300 AmeriCorps members have provided vital services including homeowner assistance and casework, removing tons of debris, offering legal services, operating donation and distribution warehouses, and coordinating donations. AmeriCorps members have mobilized or supervised more than 60,000 volunteers who have given 579,000 hours of service and provided disaster assistance to more than 2,000 Joplin households. AmeriCorps was instrumental in mobilizing more than $17.7 million of donated time and resources to support the people of Joplin in their recovery. ■ Following the 2005 Gulf Coast Hurricanes–Katrina, Rita, and Wilma, more than 110,000 participants in CNCS's AmeriCorps, Senior Corps, and Learn and Serve America programs have contributed more than 9.6 million hours to the relief, recovery, and rebuilding effort. They also have coordinated an additional 648,000 community volunteers, a major share of the overall volunteer force. Among other accomplishments, they have assisted 3 million people, completed nearly 55,000 damage assessments, refurbished more than 10,500 homes, constructed 2,000 new homes, served 1.6 million meals, and distributed more than 6,000 tons of food. ■ Record-setting flooding during mid-June 2008 drastically impacted the Cedar Rapids-Iowa City, Iowa, area with damages to some 5,390 houses and 1,049 commercial properties. Working with the Iowa state service commission and local nonprofits, CNCS mobilized hundreds of AmeriCorps members to assist in response and recovery efforts, including assessing damage, mucking out homes, connecting flood victims with resources, and supporting the volunteer reception center that has coordinated more than 7,400 volunteers who have provided 205,000 hours of service. ■ In response to flooding of the Rio Grande River caused by Hurricane Alex in 2010, AmeriCorps NCCC teams helped affected families repair roofs, replace drywall, and paint. ■ Senior Corps members joined with the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency to help develop Tennessee's bioterrorism plan to provide smallpox inoculations to the state's 5.7 million residents. ■ The Hoopa Tribal Civilian Community Corps (TCCC) worked with other AmeriCorps members to help people in Winona and Fillmore Counties in Minnesota recover from flooding. ■ Partnering with Serve Rhode Island, AmeriCorps NCCC members responded to the March 2010 flooding of the Pawtuxet River, capturing and tracking work requests for clean-up assistance, referring requests to volunteer organizations, and coordinating response organizations and agencies. ■ In 2010, AmeriCorps St. Louis, AmeriCorps NCCC, and Hoopa TCCC members deployed to Ebenezer City, Mississippi, to respond to a nearly mile-wide tornado that tore through 17 counties. The members provided volunteer coordination, removed debris, and conducted home repairs. ■ On April 27, 2011 Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, Georgia, Kentucky, and Virginia were hit with the deadliest tornadoes in 37 years. National Service participants operated Volunteer Reception Centers and staffed 211 call centers while approximately 150 AmeriCorps NCCC members assisted with debris removal, food distribution, and volunteer coordination. To learn more about how national service supports communities affected by disasters, or how you may work with us to make communities safer, please contact the CNCS Disaster Services Unit at kdegraff@cns.gov or visit our website at NationalService.gov.