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MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
MDG Presentation
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MDG Presentation

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  • 1. Millennium Development Goals Spring 11 Child Rights From Jan Vandemoortele
  • 2. MDGs
    • 1. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
    • 2. Achieve universal primary education
    • 3. Promote gender equality and empower women
    • 4. Reduce child mortality
    • 5. Improve maternal health
    • 6. Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases
    • 7. Ensure environmental sustainability
    • 8. Develop a global partnership for development
  • 3. Changing development climate
    • Changes in development assistance and financing
    • MDGs: Unifying agenda
    • Monterrey Consensus: Aid linked to strong governance
    • PRSPs: Gained prominence
    • SWAps: Direct budget support, coordinated action
    • BUT
    • MDGs: Little progress on children’s rights and gender equality
    • PRSP, SWAPs: Lacklustre results for women, children, marginalized and poorest groups
    • Fragile states not benefiting
  • 4.
        • economic growth - 1961
        • education – 1959/61
        • smallpox - 1966
        • water & immunisation - 1980
    MDGs : really new ? Easily set, seldom met ?
  • 5. Target setting: dangers
    • bias national priorities
    • neglect non-measurable results
    • inflate reported progress
  • 6. Three key questions
    • Is MDG progress on track?
    • Is ‘average’ progress reaching the poor?
    • Are MDGs affordable?
  • 7. Poverty headcount in developing countries (below $1/day) 16%
  • 8. Most regions fail to reduce poverty (below $1/day) SSA SA EA LAC MENA
  • 9. U5MR and NER ( developing countries ) U5MR NER 2015
  • 10. The poor & ‘average’ progress (ratio of U5MR of bottom to top quintile)
  • 11. Progress by-passes the poor (children not completing 5yrs of education)
  • 12. No reliable and comparable data 1990 2000 2015 MDG progress in 1990s 40%
  • 13.
    • Story of 1990s
    • progress slowed down
    • progress by-passed poor
    • It can be done
    • committed leadership
    • genuine participation
    • extra money
    • strong partnership
  • 14. Averages are deceiving
    • Different ways to meet a target
      • by improving situation of better-off
      • by increasing level for worse-off
      • any combination in-between
    • Evidence suggests most countries follow top-down approach
    • Groups that see fastest progress seldom represent the poor
  • 15.
    • Global cost estimates range from $50b-$100b+ per year
    • Differences depend on:
      • absolute vs. relative unit costs
      • marginal vs. average unit costs
      • regional vs. national average costs
      • efficiency gains vs. quality costs
      • savings from synergies
      • implications of HIV/AIDS
      • domestic vs. external resources
    • Globally, MDGs are affordable
    Are MDGs affordable?
  • 16. Pro-poor policies
    • Avoid ‘small government’ ideology.
    • Shun tight inflation targets.
    • Deregulate financial markets with great care.
    • Liberalise trade cautiously.
    • Address equity & narrow gaps.
  • 17. Pro-poor mythology
    • Poverty reduction is not an ‘universal’ good.
    • Neither an automatic by-product of macro-economic stability & growth.
    • An honest search for real solutions leads to hard trade-offs & tough policy choices.
    • Tendency to stick to conventional wisdom, generalities & myths.
  • 18.
    • Prioritise – focus on human poverty.
    • Pro-poor budgetary spending.
    • Participation.
    PRSPs: 3 achievements
  • 19.
    • Align policy framework and national budget with MDGs .
    • Translate pro-poor growth in concrete measures.
    • Incorporate equity targets.
    PRSPs: 3 challenges
  • 20.
    • Growth has an obvious place.
    • But evidence shows that high inequality inhibits growth.
    • Equity is good for the poor because it is good for growth.
    • Yet, most PRSs overlook equity.
    Is equity good for the poor?
  • 21. The goal
    • Equitable and Sustainable human well-being beyond the narrow domain of economic growth
  • 22. Target population Programme E mistake: excessive coverage (leakage) F mistake: failure to reach target population Targeting
  • 23. Narrow targeting: use sparingly
    • Difficult to identify & reach the poor.
    • F mistake
    • Poor get bumped-off by near-poor.
    • E mistake
    • Administrative costs are high.
    • avoid F/E mistakes; oversight
    • Proving eligibility is not without costs.
    • documents, fees, bus fares, stigma
    • Sustainability is undermined.
    • poor’s voice weak to maintain scope/quality
  • 24. Cost recovery: caution
    • User fees generate modest amounts.
    • But they reduce access, esp. for poor.
    • Exemption & waivers perform poorly.
    • User fees deepen gender bias.
    • Price signals do not always lead to optimal use.
  • 25. Cost recovery: 7 good practice s
    • Retain revenue & spending authority at local level.
    • Invest in quality-enhancing inputs.
    • Accept different types of contributions.
    • Base exemption scheme on observable criteria.
    • Use graduated fees.
    • Maximise community participation.
    • Conduct regular M&E.

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