Delivering to older people from a CountySports Partnership perspectiveClaire Scott, Development Manager, LIVING SPORT
What is a CSP?• Part of CSPN, 49 within the Country• CSPs receive funding from Sport England to deliver  against a core sp...
LIVING SPORT working with Age UK• Applied for funding from Age Concern’s fit as a fiddle portfolio to deliver a project  f...
Methods of Delivery• Working with Partners and Older Adults to  establish needs and interests.• Variety of classes on offe...
Impacts Impacts for Older Adults • Physical ‘I enjoy coming along, it has definitely helped my knees and made it easier to...
Contact DetailsLIVING SPORTClaire ScottDevelopment Manager, LIVING SPORT01487 849912Claire.scott@livingsport.co.ukFinding ...
Contact DetailsLIVING SPORTClaire ScottDevelopment Manager, LIVING SPORT01487 849912Claire.scott@livingsport.co.ukFinding ...
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Living Sport Claire Scott

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Age UK's Sports Seminar, Living Sport Claire Scott, 5th December, presentation

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  • CSPN The County Sports Partnership Network (CSPN) is a nationwide network of 49 County Sports Partnerships (CSPs) which are committed to working together to provide a cohesive offer to regional and national agencies, sharing good practice and continually improving the effectiveness of the network. The CSPN speaks on behalf of this network with national agencies and supports the development of CSPs through peer support, communication and collaboration. The CSPN is financially supported by CSPs and other national partners. What are County Sports Partnerships? County Sports Partnerships (CSPs) are networks of local agencies committed to working together to increase participation in sport and physical activity.  Partners include National Governing Bodies of Sport and their clubs, school sport partnerships, local authorities, sport and leisure facilities, health and many other sport and non-sporting organisations.  Some common characteristics include: - Providing a leadership role within local areas for Sport and Physical Activity – id needs, barriers, blockages, brokering relationships across the agendas - Support strategic planning and coordination – avoid duplication, suits local needs, resource use. -  Capacity building, adding value and support to local partnerships and networks. - Advocacy role for Sport and Networks - Safeguarding, Equality and Governance.  Where does the money come from? Sport England Sport England invests in CSPs to deliver services for national governing bodies, to support our work with local government and with children and young people, and to deliver on our key legacy programmes Sportivate and Sport Makers. Key strategy document for the next 4 years is called the 2012-17 Youth and Community Strategy for Sport England (January 2012.) Highlights how £1billion will be invested into Sport over the next 4years. The key focus is Children and Young People, but wider investment for targeted audiences, facility investment etc will be available where appropriate. For example the local golf partnership in Cambridgeshire will be looking to target 60% of their WSP/ SE funding will be on work with 26yrs plus (as and when funding is confirmed.) Other Funders CSP receive funding from a variety of other sources such as Health, Local Authority, Voluntary Sector, Lottery, Commercial to deliver different projects and programmes.  
  •   Why we applied? Identified a need for more older adult physical activity opportunities, throughout the county. Dance and Movement highlighted by older adult consultation for a fun, social activity – not necessarily for physical activity - hidden agenda. Linked into several local, regional and national agendas at the time Focus areas Predominately focussed on Cambridgeshire as there was also a faaf project in Peterborough – utilising resources Working from least mobile – chair based, dementia classes, to social and community dances Used sheltered housing, libraries, village halls, community centres, leisure centres DFF focused purely on the Physical and Mental wellbeing aspects not nutrition. Outcomes Overachieved on the physical and mental wellbeing outcomes.
  • Establishing Interest / needs - Linking with EMDP to identify current activity and workforce, Shared learning - Golden Age Fairs, surveys, group visits. Partner engagement Health – specifically falls service Local Authorities – Linking and learning from each other. Sustaining activity Cambridgeshire Celebrates Age, and other older adult groups Age UK Cambridgeshire – Linking service awareness, promotional leaflets, visits Sheltered Housing – venues, training, awareness, support. Variety of classes - Full range for mobility. Session planning for inclusiveness Health and Safety considerations and venue considerations Delivery models Training – linked with another CSP project called East Links to train over 30 chair and OTAGO teachers within the county, linking to falls prevention to create more workforce. Bursary – outline initiative. Reduced risk, non traditional partners, community lead, built in sustainability if viable. Establish and Sustain – Teacher, venue, develop class. Sustaining classes constitutions, funding access etc. Marketing Different methods – posters, leaflets, online, WOM, newspapers, utilising the networks Older adult input – leaflet drop example.
  • Impact for Older Adults Physical : Increased perception of fitness, feeling better, increased strength, and improved balance and coordination. Improvement in walking, and reporting increased walking or other activity following involvement in the project. Mental : Quote from an agoraphobic lady within sheltered housing where the class she attends on site has given her the confidence to leave her flat more and go off site with friends she has developed during the class. Bereavement examples. Social : Becoming more social, developing friendships, utilising skills – having a purpose, Impacts for LIVING SPORT Understanding – partners, delivery, barriers Ability to assist partners including NGBs to target older adults where appropriate. Where they have identified older adult segments we can then help locally identify how to target, and address the needs of that community. Highlight how many NGB WSP will have highlighted Market segments to help target their offers moreso. Examples: Roger and Joy, Terry, Norma, Elise and Arnold. (9 or the 19 segments fit within 50+yrs age range) Information available using that tool – mapping, Sports overview and interests, Motivations, Barriers, Marketing, Brand association.
  • Living Sport Claire Scott

    1. 1. Delivering to older people from a CountySports Partnership perspectiveClaire Scott, Development Manager, LIVING SPORT
    2. 2. What is a CSP?• Part of CSPN, 49 within the Country• CSPs receive funding from Sport England to deliver against a core specification, and access other funding to deliver against their local strategic priorities.• CSPs work with a variety of partners to promote, support and deliver Sport and Physical Activity opportunities locally within their communities.Useful Resources/ LinksCSPN www.cspnetwork.org/en/ Twitter: @CSPnetworkLIVING SPORT www.livingsport.co.uk Twitter: @LIVING_SPORTSport England www.sportengland.gov.uk Twitter: @Sport_EnglandFit as a Fiddle
    3. 3. LIVING SPORT working with Age UK• Applied for funding from Age Concern’s fit as a fiddle portfolio to deliver a project for older adults in 2007.• Delivered the Dancing for Fun and Better Health Project. (Oct 2007 – June 2012) Focussed on: • 50yrs+ within Cambridgeshire and Peterborough • Provide dance and movement opportunities for all • Sheltered Housing and Community Venues • Physical and Mental Health outcomes.• Outcomes of Project: • 839 participants benefiting from physical activity sessions (118% target) • Total outcome of 1748 across the 2 measures Physical activity and Mental wellbeing (123% target) • 12,055 total attendances at activities, with 1150 sessions delivered, with 26 classes established. Fit as a Fiddle
    4. 4. Methods of Delivery• Working with Partners and Older Adults to establish needs and interests.• Variety of classes on offer including Social Tea Dance, Chair Based Exercise, Middle Eastern Dance, Zumba.• Different delivery models: Establish and Support. • Training • Bursary • Establish and Sustain• Marketing • Local Contacts and Sources • Older Adult friendly.Fit as a Fiddle
    5. 5. Impacts Impacts for Older Adults • Physical ‘I enjoy coming along, it has definitely helped my knees and made it easier to walk and move’ • Mental ‘I now dont mind going out on my own.’ • Social ‘I wouldn’t see anyone if I didn’t not have this group. It gets me out of the house.’ Link to video Impacts for LIVING SPORT • Greater understanding for older adult needs, partnerships, and networks. • Ability to support the wider partnership to deliver against older adult agendas. Useful Resource / Link Sport England Market Segmentation: http://segments.sportengland.org/Fit as a Fiddle
    6. 6. Contact DetailsLIVING SPORTClaire ScottDevelopment Manager, LIVING SPORT01487 849912Claire.scott@livingsport.co.ukFinding your local CSP contacthttp://www.cspnetwork.org/en/your_csp/?s=BGDPJezzg8tExe1VFit as a Fiddle
    7. 7. Contact DetailsLIVING SPORTClaire ScottDevelopment Manager, LIVING SPORT01487 849912Claire.scott@livingsport.co.ukFinding your local CSP contacthttp://www.cspnetwork.org/en/your_csp/?s=BGDPJezzg8tExe1VFit as a Fiddle
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