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A 2-day workshop on the usage of social media for the arts in India

A 2-day workshop on the usage of social media for the arts in India

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  • Reference MalcolmGladwell here
  • Evolution of typical business and/or acquisition models (advertising to subscription to virality). These variables - irrespective of the name - are actually used in business plan writing.
  • Encourage to bring up their own sites and do a review. Either in this session or in Session 3.
  • Allows others to post to his Wall – increases sense of activity, conversation
  • Interesting they utilized a Group page
  • Spend some real time here going through the differences
  • Emphasize that the point is not to incorporate 4000 tools, but each one you do, measure it, and do it well
  • Brand persona is important – how does the brand and voice across the two pages work. It doesn’t have to be the same, but there should be some thought and decisions behind this.
  • Think of it as saying something in a room, and then walking away without waiting to hear peoples’ responses. It’s ending the conversation.

Art & Social Media in India Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Art & Social Mediain the indian context
    Anita Garimella
    16 & 17 January 2010
    Bangalore, India
    Art, Resources & Teaching Trust
  • 2. Workshop schedule
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and Web 2.0
    Part 2: Deep Dive - Case Studies: Art & Social Media in India
    Part 3: Opportunities and Challenges for using Social Media for Art in India
    Part 4: Future of the Internet & Technology and their impact on Art
    2
  • 3. Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and Web 2.0
  • 4. Part 1:Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    What is Social Media – and how does it connect with Web 2.0?
    Impact on content creation and consumption
    How is Social Media measured?
    Virality
    4
  • 5. What was web 1.0?
    Technology & Design
    Slower speeds (Dial-up, 50K avg bandwidth)
    Frames, Proprietary HTML and browser wars
    Monetize through banner ads (“impressions”)
    Navigation = “SURF the internet”
    Click link after link after link  Hope to find what you are looking for
    Commerce was king
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    Editor-determined links
    No search box
    AOL 1997
    Yahoo India 2000
    5
  • 6. What was web 1.0?
    Static pages, but self-expression was alive
    Personal web pages were the rage
    Resumes, writings, etc. - cheap to publish
    Photos were trickier…costly to publish  Gives rise to Kodak’s Photo Gallery, Ofoto.com, etc.
    Early user-generated content
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    Geocities.com 1996
    6
  • 7. What is web 2.0?
    Technology & Design
    Faster (1 MB bandwidth) and improved browsers
    AJAX & Flash, Widgets
    Customization & Personalization
    Monetize through clicks on ads (Pay-Per-Click)
    Navigation = “SEARCH the internet”
    Advent of Google  Find exactly what you want
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    Customized
    Widgets
    AJAX
    iGoogle 2009
    7
  • 8. What is web 2.0?
    Dynamic pages support interactive self-expression
    The way the web is used and perceived as a dynamic source of content 1
    Communities, blogs, wikis, user-generated content on 3rd party sites, mash-ups, tagging, social networking
    User-oriented design
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    Votes
    Throw Tomato
    Applaud
    Comments
    1: Social Media is a Cocktail Party – Jim Tobin
    8
  • 9. What is web 2.0?
    Explosion of content and publishing capabilities requires efficient search
    Search in turn requires search engine optimization (SEO) in order to be found
     Construction, Content, and Purpose of site radically impacted1
    Purpose = Click these buttons
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    Extreme linking for SEO
    Tagging for SEO & user-oriented design
    1- Social Media is a Cocktail Party – Jim Tobin
    9
  • 10. What is social media?
    Online technologies (internet-based, phone-based, widget-based) that allow people to share content, opinions, insights, experiences, perspectives, and media themselves1
    Relies upon Web 2.0 technologies of AJAX and Flash
    Heavily connected to the interactive self-expression of Web 2.0
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    Web 2.0
    Social Media
    1- Social Media is a Cocktail Party – Jim Tobin
    10
  • 11. Web 2.0 vs. social media
    Web 2.0
    Dynamic links based on user click-throughs
    Web 2.0’s technologies enable this Social Media: Citizen Journalist Reports
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    These social Web 2.0 technologies allow the story to live on and morph without limit – and thus social media is unlimited, unlike traditional industrial media
    11
  • 12. Web 2.0 & social media: what’s the impact on the marketer/content creator?
    1950s: Marketer could dictate to Channel (store) and Consumer
    1980s: Channel could dictate to Marketer and Consumer
    Now: Consumer dictates to Channel and Marketer*
    *US timeline; different and more compressed in India.
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    Source: Social Media is a Cocktail Party – Jim Tobin
    12
  • 13. social media: individual power
    Individual preferences
    Granular control of publishing/media
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    Source: http://www.individual-i.com/images/individual-i-red.jpg
    13
  • 14. Social media: individual preferences
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    14
  • 15. Social media: individual preferences
    Serious impact on applications/publishers and on power of “friend” relationships
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    15
  • 16. Social media: granular media power
    Old World
    New World
    Share the site  is the whole site worth it? Will the recipient know where to look?
    Share this content  is this particular piece worth it?
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    Share the URL
    Embed or link to this video
    Share just this post
    16
  • 17. social media: impact of localized controls
    Consequences for being “ignored” (either passively or actively) are very high in display algorithms  benefits organizations with more resources and more content
    What determines which content shows up here and in what order?
    17
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
  • 18. social media: impact of localized controls
    Bar for sharing content is lowered
    Need to only find a particular piece of content worthy of passing on
    Benefits content creators, especially smaller, independent organizations
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    Share just this post
    18
  • 19. social media: impact of localized controls
    Ultimately, the individual is staking their reputation on the “sharing” or publishing action  perceived impact on individual reputation is now a strong factor for publishing success
    Different from traditional media
    19
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
  • 20. How is social media measured?
    1.0 way of measurement: How many features does a site incorporate?
    Blogs
    Share links (deli.cio.us, e-mail, twitter, etc.)
    Does it have commenting?
    Can users post?
     Quantifying functionality -answering the question of “do you support X service/tool or not?”
    20
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
  • 21. How is social media measured?
    2.0 way of measurement: What is the goal?
    Goal = Virality = page views, installs, etc.
    How many people clicked this?
    And, how many of the people who saw the “Shared” video clicked to view this video?
    And so on…
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    21
  • 22. What is Virality?
    The act of content on the web being spread by users sharing it, bringing new users to the original content and therefore adding additional utility1
    Social Media is about creating conversations
    Social Media is unlimited so virality as a goal allows marketers to achieve their goal of infinite engagement and conversation
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    1- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virality
    22
  • 23. Why virality?
    The more people who share (“spread the virus”), the more eyeballs  generates advertising revenue
    Obama Campaign
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    Source: http://www.cooltownstudios.com/images/viralloopnetwork.jpg
    23
  • 24. Measuring virality
    Variables are taken from medicine/biology
    K-factor (contagion), R-zero (reproduction rate)
    Viral factor (K-factor) = Distribution * Infection
    Distribution = how many people will see the media I share
    Infection = How likely are the people who see it to share it?
    K-factor < 1 = user/viewer base is shrinking
    K=1 = user base is neither growing or shrinking
    K > 1 = user base is growing
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    Source = FrameThink
    24
  • 25. Measuring virality
    Objectives1
    Increase % of people who share (i.e. are Distributors) with people who haven’t seen the media yet
    Increase the number of times a person shares
    Increase the amount of time the average person spends time with the media (“retention”) sharing
    Increase the likelihood that people who are shared with turn into sharers themselves
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    1: FrameThink; Graphs from newteevee.com
    25
  • 26. Does social media apply to art? Yes!
    Part 1: Social Media, Web 1.0 and 2.0, and Art
    26
  • 27. Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art & Social Media in India
  • 28. Part 2:Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Art-making & Artists
    Artists & Commerce
    Art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    Art marketing (galleries, auction houses)
    Publishers
    28
  • 29. Case Study: art-making, artists & social media
    SairaWasim – http://www.sairawasim.com
    Web 1.0 artist presentation
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    29
  • 30. Case Study: art-making, artists & social media
    SairaWasim – Facebook
    No art content, relatively unused page
    30
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 31. Case Study: art-making, artists & social media
    AnjolieElaMenon – http://www.indianartcircle.com/anjolieelamenon/aem_ind1.shtml
    Web 1.0 artist presentation
    31
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 32. Case Study: art-making, artists & social media
    AnjolieElaMenon – Facebook
    Privacy blocked page, small number of friends
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    • Raises interesting questions about public vs. private lives of artists
    32
  • 33. Case Study: art-making, artists & social media
    MilindNayak – http://www.milindnayak.com/
    Web 1.0 artist presentation
    33
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 34. Case Study: art-making, artists & social media
    What does “Profile” require and mean in a world full of social media?
    34
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 35. Case Study: art-making, artists & social media
    MilindNayak – Facebook
    Privacy blocked page, small number of friends
    Even less content than on own website
    35
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 36. Case Study: art-making, artists & social media
    MithuSen – http://www.mithusen.com
    Interactive art-making  social media
    “This is an interactive art project to 100 people of different field from my personal contacts. I would like you to forward this offer to any one of your personal choice from your mailing list.”
    This is utilizing social media virality to create art
    Mix of online and off-line techniques
    Could improve shareability – no Facebook page
    36
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 37. Case Study: art-making, artists & social media
    ArchanaHande – http://www.archanahande.com/
    Web 1.0 artist presentation
    37
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 38. Case Study: art-making, artists & social media
    ArchanaHande – Facebook
    Resume-style, no Wall, no Photos
    38
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 39. Case Study: art-making, artists & social media
    ArchanaHande – http://www.archanahande.com/
    www.arrangeurownmarriage.com
    39
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 40. Case Study: art-making, artists & social media
    ArchanaHande – http://www.arrangeurownmarriage.com/
    Interactive art-making
    Make your ideal man/woman
    Make your own invitation
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Fun, satirical, but…
    40
  • 41. Case Study: art-making, artists & social media
    Dancing Elf from OfficeMax - http://www.elfyourself.com/
    Very popular and viral
    …Missing the social component!
    41
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 42. Case Study: art-making, artists & social media
    Bose Krishnamachari – Facebook
    No personal website
    Palpable sense of buzz, activity
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Lots of photos
    42
  • 43. Case Study: art-making, artists & social media
    Bose Krishnamachari – Facebook
    Interesting usage of photos functionality to self-promote
    Visually rich
    Tag-able
    Link-able
    Very time-intensive
    43
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 44. Case Study: artists & commerce
    Fun Bunny Life – http://www.funnybunnylife.com
    Web 1.0 presentation of site
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Need to email to order!
    No sense of availability, time to processing, etc.
    44
  • 45. Case Study: artists & commerce
    Fun Bunny Life on Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=243452855327
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    What ought to be the purpose of the Facebook page?
    Is it promotion of the artists?
    Is it sales?
    45
  • 46. Case Study: artists & commerce
    Design Temple – http://www.designtemple.net
    No Facebook
    Really compelling design/animation graphic
    Really should be sharing-enabled
    46
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 47. Case Study: artists & commerce
    Design Temple – http://www.designtemple.net
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    No connection to social networks, tools, etc.
    What should the expectations around recency be?
    47
  • 48. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    A.R.T. http://www.artscapeindia.org/
    Web 1.0 presentation
    48
    Recency?
    Good SEO content – but page is missing mentions of India
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Unlinked content – are these services they don’t offer?
    Better ways to handle “coming soon”
  • 49. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    A.R.T. http://www.artscapeindia.org/
    49
    No sharing functions
    Content is not even link-able!
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 50. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    A.R.T. http://www.artscapeindia.org/
    50
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Last blog update is almost a year ago
    Better served putting this in News & Articles or something like that…Blog has some specific connotations and value
  • 51. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    A.R.T. on Facebook
    http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=140331692218
    http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000280226177
    51
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Facebook Profile
    Facebook Group
    What’s the purpose of each? What’s the policy and management of each?
  • 52. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    A.R.T. on Facebook
    Strange for an organization to have a Profile
    Profiles are best for individuals
    Better to create a Page
    Pages are good for the long-term
    Groups are better for quick efforts
    52
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Source: http://www.searchenginejournal.com/facebook-group-vs-facebook-fan-page-whats-better/7761/
  • 53. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    Devi Art Foundation – http://www.deviartfoundation.org
    Web 1.0
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Catches the eye…
    53
  • 54. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    Devi Art Foundation Dream Museum – http://www.deviartfoundation.org/dreammuseumproject/index.htm
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Project is over – but page neither reflects that status, nor provides an answer to the question of “so, what came of it?”. What does this mean about the sincerity, quality, or focus of the effort?
    54
  • 55. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    Asia Art Archive Dream Museum site http://www.dreammuseum.org/
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Social network (sharing) capabilities – but no mention of Indian version of project
    55
  • 56. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    Devi Art Foundation – Facebook
    Content-rich
    Lots of feedback, comments  participation
    But…
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    1,032 fans
    56
  • 57. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    Lots of feedback, comments  participation
    But…
    Smithsonian Art Museum site http://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2009/1934/
    …Missing the connective tissue between the two worlds
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Full support of Twitter, blogs, Facebook, itunes, etc.
    57
  • 58. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    Smithsonian events http://americanart.si.edu/calendar/exhibition/
    For events, full integration of every social media tool available
    Brings to mind issues regarding measurement
    58
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 59. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    Smithsonian Lunder Institute – Facebook
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Links back to organization’s website
    Two-way linking boosts SEO
    59
  • 60. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    Smithsonian Lunder Institute – http://americanart.si.edu/lunder/
    Completely missing social media link back to Facebook page!
    60
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 61. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    Prakriti Foundation – http://www.prakritifoundation.com
    Web 1.0
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Very interesting early native Web 2.0 social media implementation
    61
  • 62. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    Prakriti Foundation the Park’s New Festival – http://www.theparksnewfestival.com
    Wonderful image and text content from the festival
    Lost opportunities:
    Integrate rich media (recordings of performance)
    Sharing functions
    62
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 63. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    Dastkar – http://www.dastkar.org
    Web 1.0
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Missing the power of
    Jyothi & Swathi
    63
  • 64. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    Kiva – http://www.kiva.org
    Great example of entrepreneur support site using Social Media
    Dastkar can create a presence for itself on this social network
    Entrepreneur feeds
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    News feeds
    News feeds
    Lender profiles
    64
  • 65. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    Kiva – http://www.kiva.org/app.php?page=businesses&action=about&id=84246&_tpos=7&_tpg=1
    Example artist (entrepreneur) page
    Journal/Blog
    Ability to create much richer background to the artist, a new art history
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Social status for lenders
    103 Comments
    65
  • 66. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    Causes – on Facebookhttp://apps.facebook.com/causes
    Artist support organizations can create “causes”, harnessing the proven human interest in being a cause supporter, and more interestingly, being known for being a supporter
    66
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 67. Case Study: art advocacy & support (non-profits, foundations)
    Causes – on Facebookhttp://apps.facebook.com/causes
    News feeds, commenting, leader boards  leverage social status desires
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    67
  • 68. Case Study: art marketing (galleries, auction houses)
    Saffron Art – http://www.saffronart.com
    Usable, technically modern site
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Great provision of multiple search & browse methods
    Rich non-commerce content  great for SEO
    68
  • 69. Case Study: art marketing (galleries, auction houses)
    Saffron Art – http://www.saffronart.com
    Lots of editorial content leads to great SEO
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Saffron Art site, Twitter, & Facebook occupy top 3 spots
    69
  • 70. Case Study: art marketing (galleries, auction houses)
    Saffron Art Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/Saffronart
    Fresh, current
    Frequent posts
    Repeat posts about same topic
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    70
  • 71. Case Study: art marketing (galleries, auction houses)
    Saffron Art Twitter – http://twitter.com/saffronart
    Takes advantage of Twitter’s design template capabilities to convey brand image
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Great use of re-tweeting to provide “twitter love”
    71
  • 72. Case Study: art marketing (galleries, auction houses)
    Saffron Art site – opportunities for improvement
    Missing connection to Facebook Events
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Commentary is disconnected from Facebook , Twitter conversation
    72
  • 73. Case Study: art marketing (galleries, auction houses)
    Saffron Art – opportunities for improvement
    Disconnect between Events listed on website and on Facebook consistency is so important
    73
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 74. Case Study: art marketing (galleries, auction houses)
    Christie’s – http://www.christies.com
    74
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 75. Case Study: art marketing (galleries, auction houses)
    Christie’s Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/pages/Christies/32187590434
    Good use of multiple applications/tabs
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Great cross-linking to other Facebook pages
    75
  • 76. Case Study: art marketing (galleries, auction houses)
    Christie’s Facebook Application – http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?v=info&id=31946525769
    Attempt to create an application by an art organization
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Not successful –
    More fans than monthly active users
    Reminiscent of original eBay application (as opposed to eBay Gift-It which has social component)
    76
  • 77. Case Study: art marketing (galleries, auction houses)
    Sotheby’s – http://www.sothebys.com
    Rich video library – no ability to share
    77
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 78. Case Study: art marketing (galleries, auction houses)
    Sotheby’s – http://www.sothebys.com
    Well-presented Events Calendar – but no real publication/social component
    Except for ability to publish to calendars, which may or may not be publicly shared
    78
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 79. Case Study: art marketing (galleries, auction houses)
    Sotheby’s Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/pages/Sothebys/74825160647
    Last post was on November 13…2008!
    79
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    Opportunity for colloquial discourse in an elite world
  • 80. Case Study: art marketing (galleries, auction houses)
    Osians – http://www.osians.com
    What is this organization about? Need to develop this sort of thing before deciding on social media strategy
    80
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 81. Case Study: art marketing (galleries, auction houses)
    Apparao Art – http://www.apparaoart.com
    No Facebook presence
    Clear that money was spent to design this site
    But may pages are out of date
    But…
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    81
  • 82. Case Study: art marketing (galleries, auction houses)
    Apparao Art – http://www.apparaoart.com
    …Huge efforts spent on commercial components
    Detailed presentation of art for sale
    Searchable, wishlists, etc.
    Missing connection to social components
    Broken links
    82
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 83. Case Study: publishers
    Seagull India – http://www.seagullindia.com
    Direct prominent link to Facebook page
    But not much focus on explaining who/what they are
    83
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 84. Case Study: publishers
    Seagull India – http://www.seagullindia.com
    Great strong use of Events application
    Don’t be afraid to post others’ events
    84
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
  • 85. Case Study: publishers
    Tara Books – http://www.tarabooks.com
    Great example of a package of a site, Twitter, Facebook – strikes a nice balance
    Good UI design
    Clear compelling purpose to the site
    Current content
    Part 2: Deep Dive – Case Studies: Art &Social Media
    85
  • 86. Case Study: publishers
    Tara Books – http://www.tarabooks.com
    Current content
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    Cross-linking
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  • 87. Case Study: publishers
    Tara Books on Twitter – http://twitter.com/TaraBooks
    Works well for events publication
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    What’s the purpose of this type of tweet?
    87
  • 88. Case Study: publishers
    Tulika Books – http://www.tulikabooks.com
    Interesting how a children’s book site does not conceive of a child as a target audience
    Leads to a vibrant blog – again geared towards adults
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  • 89. Case Study: publishers
    Tulika Books on Twitter – http://twitter.com/tulikabooks
    Vibrant page – but geared towards adults
    What about presence on children’s sites like Bebo?
    How to manage multiple audiences on the internet?
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  • 90. Part 3: opportunities & challenges for art using social media in india
  • 91. Part 3:Opportunities & Challenges for Art using Social Media
    Observations and questions about current social media usage for art in India
    Importance of defining goals in social media usage & the dangers of virality
    What are good ways to use social media for art?
    Copyrights, public domain & art-making
    Democratization of art through social media – is that really possible?
    91
  • 92. Key observations
    Generally, a Web 1.0 implementation on individual destination sites
    Lots of outdated content presented in such a way that the “staleness” is readily apparent
    Many of the sites have great content worthy of sharing
    Lots of disconnect between different internet personas (representations)
    Lack of clear voice, audience and objective definition
    Current social media usage is mostly for publicity/marketing (as yet another website to put content on)
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    92
  • 93. Some questions – destination websites
    What is the purpose of the destination website?
    What causes the website to be created?
    How does it fit into the organization on an ongoing basis?
    Who is the target audience?
    How do websites come together (how are they implemented)?
    What are the resource (time & money) allocation issues?
    What are the technology issues?
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  • 94. Some questions – destination websites
    What are the cultural norms and expectations about recency, relevancy, and frequency?
    What are the Indian art community’s expectations for design, usability, etc. of fellow art professionals’ sites?
    What are the sources of revenue from the website?
    What is the role of online advertising, fundraising, etc.?
    94
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  • 95. Some questions – social media/networking
    What is the purpose for art professionals utilizing this new tool?
    How does the initiative to integrate social media come about within the organization?
    What are the implications in terms of funding, focus, and time allocation?
    Who are the target audiences?
    Is this just another way to connect with existing people “in their village”?
    Is it hard to recreate existing conversations in the village online?
    How do local languages factor in?
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  • 96. Some questions – social media/networking
    Are there cultural nuances vis-à-vis Social Media that need to be taken into consideration?
    It’s OK to copy…is that taboo in this art world?
    What does “copying” mean?
    What are the expectations for citation/sourcing? (cultural, not legal)
    Is the community aware that much of Web 2.0 and Social Media technology is free?
    Tools such as Retaggr, Ping.fm, Nambu allow for simultaneous posting to multiple social profiles
    96
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  • 97. Some questions – social media/networking
    Who is successful? Successful usage is not dependent upon having lots of money for experimentation
    Do one thing well and you can gain a ton of users/viewers (think Google!)
    Even auction houses have room for improvement – and it’s unclear whether they are achieving business objectives utilizing social media
    What’s the standard for measuring the design aesthetic?
    “Clean looks” are not as important anymore
    It’s all about usability and share-ability
    Amazon product page – 5 screens! (http://amzn.com/0307451011)
    97
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  • 98. Evolution of technology in art
    1st Phase
    Provision & consumption of data (research)
    Access to audiences (distribution)
    New consumption opportunities
    Experimentations around creation
    2nd Phase – Web 2.0 & social media provide a solution to:
    WHAT should I access? (filtering)
    WHERE should I distribute?
    HOW can we review/collaborate on an experience?
    The solution is imperfect…
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  • 99. Understanding the place of social media in art and art organizations
    Important to not fit a square peg into a round hole
    Social media IS NOT:
    A panacea for solving business, creative, or technical problems
    Social media IS:
    A tool that helps you talk to & hear from readers, viewers, and consumers in new ways
    A new way to engage in the conversation
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    Image source: http://attheridge.files.wordpress.com/2008/12/square-peg-round-hole.jpg
    99
  • 100. Understanding the place of social media in art and art organizations
    “Social Media” IS NOT:
    An assigned person in your organization
    You wouldn’t want just one person to know how to write or speak
    It should be an activity for all
    Social Media IS:
    One part advertising, one part message development and distribution (PR), one part customer support, one part product development, one part digital marketing, one part SEO, and one part analytics measurement
    Social Media must answer a need. Must inspire frequency of use. Just like a good conversation.
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    Source: Social Media is a Cocktail Party – Jim Tobin
    100
  • 101. Goals for using social media for the arts
    Really important to define measurable realistic goals in using this tool
    A tool is useless if you’re simply using it because everybody else is also using it
    The novelty time has passed
    For example…More orders, more attendees, more page views, more donations
    Social Media has to penetrate the “I care” barrier
    How does your product or content solve a need or penetrate an interest for the consumer, and is it something they are willing to discuss? 1
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    1: Social Media is a Cocktail Party – Jim Tobin
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  • 102. Technological framework
    Ultimately this means people find out about you
    For now:
    Do well on Google  prioritize SEO
    Increase the # of high-value shares (good virality)  prioritize SMO
    Think deeply about pulling Connectors and Mavens into the conversation (MalcomGladwell’sThe Tipping Point)
    Cross-linking, integration is really important
    Totally missing from Indian art scene online right now
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  • 103. Technological framework
    SEO favors SM (content) over commerce (transactions)
    This is why SM is not an independent feature, but one that supports the larger picture of being found through search
    It’s not the original content, but the ensuing shares and posts/comments regarding it
    Amazon, Best Buy are great examples of this
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  • 104. Technological framework
    Wikipedia pages are top page results for consumer products
    The linked-to pages are not sources for commerce activity
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    104
  • 105. Know your numbers: Metrics
    What specific metrics are you looking to improve?
    What specifically is success?
    Art marketing, discourse, creation, advocacy, etc. are like traditional for-profit businesses in many ways
    Need management, success, etc to grow and inspire the teams
    Keep in mind getting too excited about response rates, or overly valuing what you see…it’s important to measure and realize what you don’t see
    1% rule 1
    For every 100 people that view the page
    1 will create content
    10 will interact with content
    89 will just watch
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    1: Social Media is a Cocktail Party – Jim Tobin
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  • 106. Know your numbers: Metrics
    General web application data sources
    Google Analytics & PageRank
    Facebook Application Data sources
    InsideFacebook.com
    AllFacebook.com
    AppData.com
    Facebook Page Data source
    http://pagedata.insidefacebook.com
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  • 107. Know your numbers: Metrics
    Twitter reach measurement
    Tweet Reach (reach)
    Twitter Grader (find popular Tweeters in your region)
    Twinfluence (reach, velocity, capital)
    Tweet Effect (individual tweet effectiveness)
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  • 108. Social media optimization
    Make sure you’ve made sharing easy (e.g. short URLs, quick access to share functions)
    Create content others can use - write it in such a way that it makes sense to share
    Watch your numbers, understand the conversations taking place (or not), and optimize based on it
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  • 109. Dangers of virality
    How many of these will any one user do?
    Sounds great – what’s the problem?
    Huge danger of over-reliance on virality = saturation effect
    As with a biological virus, it can spread through the whole population  then what?
    It must mutate…or die
     Dynamics and usage of Social Media must mutate
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  • 110. Dangers of virality
    “Me too” approach won’t work
    That works well for things you don’t want consumers/users to notice, like good UI
    It doesn’t work well when you want users to notice and do something, because there is only so many actions any one user can take
    It creates this market-driven creativity instead of aesthetic or intrinsic creativity
    This ought to be the forte of the art world
    Yet, don’t avoid it – like a business card
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  • 111. Dangers of virality
    Designers & marketers are focused on thinking about how to stand out in the crowd
    Not what should the new model be  what’s the new mutation?
    Don’t be fooled: “engagement” is not new
    It’s being measured in terms of virality
    “My users are engaged – they shared this article 10 times”
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    111
  • 112. So, What is social media good for?
    That “conversation” is inherent in:
    Art marketing
    Art discourse
    A bit of art-making as well
    It has to be a quality conversation
    If it feels forced, then it is…Just like an offline conversation
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  • 113. So, What is social media good for?
    Viewership and fundraising
    Create documentation about the creation of the art piece
    Has two purposes:
    Helps the audience know more beforehand
    Helps the funders know where their money went (which leads to more funding)
    Creating art and spreading it virally
    Allows lesser known artists, with less resources, to come to a bigger stage
    Tends to favor populist art
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  • 114. Good ways to use Art & Social Media – Fela! Musical off-broadway (art marketing)
    http://www.facebook.com/FELAmusical
    Facebook Ad Campaign :
    $4,400 advertising spend
    18 million impressions
    5,700 clicks (.03% CTR)
    $40,000 tickets sold
    Source: New York Times (11/12/09)
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    Conversation is never-ending
    If there is no conversation, don’t force it
    Village marketplace (haggling, advising, debating, and moving on) - Jim Tobin
    114
  • 115. Good ways to use Art & Social Media – Fela! Musical off-broadway (art marketing)
    Target ads properly
    Utilize the Connections feature to find the Connectors & Mavens
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  • 116. Good ways to use Art & Social Media – rhizome (art discourse)
    http://rhizome.org/
    Consistency is key
    Reinforces double-linking & Google PageRank (SEO)
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  • 117. Good ways to use Art & Social Media – rhizome (art discourse)
    Art Discourse = CONVERSATION = Social Media
    Impossible to have true dialogue if constantly worried the conversation may go off-track
    Keep in mind purpose – have a wide berth
    Many posts are nonsensical, but they add value to various algorithms
    Allow the conversation to flow
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  • 118. Good ways of using Art & Social Media – Pad.MA (Art discourse & history)
    http://pad.ma
    Online annotated video footage
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    Robust service – technically well-implemented and focused on the creator
    Broadened, could really work well to create art histories, which can help with fundraising
    Could be leveraged for social causes as a wonderful mash-up tool
    Drawbacks: video content is not indexed, Pad.ma is not SEO’d
    118
  • 119. Good ways to use Art & Social Media – paulslocum (art making)
    “You’re not my father” http://www.qotile.net/father/
    http://www.turbulence.org/Works/notmyfather/
    Used craigslist.org to recruit – classified listings as a social media tool
    Open-source software to edit
     Very specific purpose to social interaction, very clear transactional model
    What is collaboration vs. creation vs. inspiration?
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  • 120. Good ways to use Art & Social Media – brooklyn museum of art (curation/evaluation)
    “Click” http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/click/
    Used Facebook, Flickr, website to recruit from artists
    Used their site and social networks to attract evaluators/judges
    “Crowd-sourced” curation
    Again, clear process – with real transparency into objectives, process, and results/outcome
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  • 121. Copyrights: law & mores
    Looking at the assumptions underlying copyright law
    Authorship as ownership
    Intangibles as commodities
    Narrow view of authorship
    Incentives vs. terms
    Digital technologies upend many assumptions
    Criticism by economists, cultural theorists, political economists (both right-wing and left-wing), and legal philosophers
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    This slide was created and presented by: PraneshPrakash, Programme Manager, Centre for Internet and Society, pranesh@cis-india.org, +91.99161.58217 (cell)
  • 122. Copyrights: all creation is social. solitary genius does not exist.
    Critical 20th century thinkers: Foucault links this to the creation of the "author" function, and Barthes talks of death of the author. "Adorno & Horkheimer's Culture Industry".
    "It is language the speaks, not the author"; "the text is a tissue of quotations drawn from the innumerable centres of culture"
    While it is impossible not to be influenced by culture, liberal borrowing has been done by everyone from
    Examples: Walt Disney Corporation, William Shakespeare, Vladamir Nabokov, Public Enemy
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    This slide was created and presented by: PraneshPrakash, Programme Manager, Centre for Internet and Society, pranesh@cis-india.org, +91.99161.58217 (cell)
  • 123. Copyrights: all creation is social. solitary genius does not exist.
    Cont’d
    'Stealing' is endemic in activities involving human creativity. T.S. Eliot notes that "Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different". He does not even consider the possibility that artistic borrowing, whether by imitation or by 'stealing' does not happen., and pretty much every creative person who has ever lived. Books can be written about this (and indeed, numerous books have been), so we shall not dwell on this issue.
    Exhibit: Ecstasy of Influence: A Plagiarism by Jonathan Letham
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    This slide was created and presented by: PraneshPrakash, Programme Manager, Centre for Internet and Society, pranesh@cis-india.org, +91.99161.58217 (cell)
  • 124. Copyrights: art-making online
    "Wikipedia Art": http://wikipediaart.org/
    Wikipedia Art is a conceptual art work composed on Wikipedia, and is thus art that anyone can edit. It manifests as a standard page on Wikipedia - entitled Wikipedia Art. Like all Wikipedia entries, anyone can alter this page as long as their alterations meet Wikipedia's standards of quality and verifiability.[1] As a consequence of such collaborative and consensus-driven edits to the page, Wikipedia Art, itself, changes over time.
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    This slide was created and presented by: PraneshPrakash, Programme Manager, Centre for Internet and Society, pranesh@cis-india.org, +91.99161.58217 (cell)
  • 125. Copyrights: art-making online
    Tools that allow for collaborative creation of software, and literature -- can they help in music and sculpture?
    Examples of doctors using interactive tools.
    Copyright does not envision such systems of multitudes of creators
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    This slide was created and presented by: PraneshPrakash, Programme Manager, Centre for Internet and Society, pranesh@cis-india.org, +91.99161.58217 (cell)
  • 126. Copyrights: piracy, creative commons, and giving away
    Built on different ideas of authorship and ownership Piracy has its supporters: Economic development argument
    Creator vs. Publisher, and the Paulo Coelho example
    Creative Commons
    Supports copyright law, but more power to the creator
    Encourages "remixing".
    Examples: Cory Doctorow, Nine Inch Nails, Jaaga
    Similar examples: Thermal and a Quarter
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    This slide was created and presented by: PraneshPrakash, Programme Manager, Centre for Internet and Society, pranesh@cis-india.org, +91.99161.58217 (cell)
  • 127. Copyrights: Piracy, Creative Commons, and giving away
    Giving away has always made business sense: tasters / samples
    Now, many argue that content itself is worthless, it is the experience and "limited" that are worth money
    Attention as currency?
    Examples
    127
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    This slide was created and presented by: PraneshPrakash, Programme Manager, Centre for Internet and Society, pranesh@cis-india.org, +91.99161.58217 (cell)
  • 128. Copyrights: mores and law
    Examples from the theatre surveys
    Contains complexities that the law just cannot accommodate. Differences in practices based on:
    Cities
    Recognition levels
    Corporate / non-corporate
    Etc.
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    This slide was created and presented by: PraneshPrakash, Programme Manager, Centre for Internet and Society, pranesh@cis-india.org, +91.99161.58217 (cell)
  • 129. Copyrights: concluding remarks
    Best we can do is to perpetuate the public domain, and keep the commons alive
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    This slide was created and presented by: PraneshPrakash, Programme Manager, Centre for Internet and Society, pranesh@cis-india.org, +91.99161.58217 (cell)
  • 130. Democratization
    Access to technology issues
    Social media worsens the gap as the agenda is being set by those with access
    Social Media as a democratizing force
    Easier to pass on the understanding (the “why”, “how”, “who”)
    Example: Video screens at Philadelphia Fringe Festival that allowed rating of performers on a scale of 1 to 5
    Lots of controversy - it “whittled down” the art to a number
    It also made it easier for “the people” to voice an opinion
    130
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  • 131. Democratization
    Is offline authority required for online credibility?
    No – but what does that mean for the art world?
    Example: Pitchforkmedia.com has become the authority for “indie” music reviews in the US
    Started by a guy just out of high school
    No writing experience before then
    131
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  • 132. Democratization
    Example: “The Bruno Effect”
    Twittering killed the movie Bruno from Friday’s release to Saturday’s box office results
    http://www.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,1910059,00.html
    Is the democratization false, or at least not quite what we think?
    If you can’t penetrate or use these things well, then how democratic is it?
    Parallel to green building
    How does lowered quality fit in?
    132
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  • 133. Part 4: future of the internet and technology and their impact on art
  • 134. Part 4:Future of the Internet and technology and their impact on Art
    Web 3.0: Surf to Search to Subscribe
    How to penetrate in an increasingly aggregated world
    New technologies
    Aggregators
    Easy distribution tools
    134
  • 135. Web 3.0: Where does the internet go from Here?
    What might be Web 3.0?
    Cloud computing
    Semantic web
    Connected databases
    Web 3.0 as SUBSCRIBE – take only what you want
    Surf to Search to Subscribe 1
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    1: Social Media is a Cocktail Party – Jim Tobin
    Image source: http://blogs.nesta.org.uk/innovation/2007/07/the-future-is-s.html
    135
  • 136. The impact of web 3.0
    Natural evolution of the Attention Age
    Access to more data through single points of entry
    People search less often, get set into what they like
    Either you or “the machine” has to penetrate:
    What is searched for; AND
    What is chosen for incorporation into a user’s customized “home” on the internet
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    136
  • 137. The impact of web 3.0
    This quickly makes a lot of content irrelevant (if it is not fed into that single point of entry)
    Raises issues of staleness and maintenance (of the subscription algorithm)
    Does this mean search will die out?
    No, same way that surf hasn’t died out
    It will be hard to optimize your way to sales/traffic by simply optimizing for search 1
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    1: Social Media is a Cocktail Party – Jim Tobin
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  • 138. Special considerations for art
    Budgets tend to be smaller
    Impact on becoming part of the cloud
    Need to become even more focused & targeted in efforts
    There is need for prioritized experimentation, but lack of resources/funding
    Growth of Open Source software – relevancy of software to art creation/modification
    Creates potential for art professionals to bridge the gap
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  • 139. Special considerations for art
    How does subscribing to art sources differ from commerce or news?
    How does semantic web work with images, video (i.e. non-text content)?
    One thing is clear: Sites that don’t allow participation will die
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  • 140. Penetrating the noise
    Message from a friend > message from you (the marketer)
    What’s the best way to tell?
    Every site has Tell a Friend, Share, etc.
    What’s the next, new best way to tell?
    How can the creativity of the art world be leveraged to design this?
    Connectors, Mavens, and Salesmen are your friends – IDENTIFY them
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  • 141. Penetrating the noise
    Success metrics for measuring SM and Art
    How to quantify buzz on the internet
    “Sentiment Analysis”
    Quantitatively determine the overall reception (sentiment) of something when there are massive quantities of comment
    A technical solution that undoubtedly factors into the Web 3.0 world (feeds the machine learning)
    141
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  • 142. Penetrating the noise
    Example: Trendsta
    Combines strategic user penetration a la Gladwell with sentiment measurement
    Raises issue of undue influence of a group or individual (ego massaging) – implications for democratization
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  • 143. New trends in social media for art
    Virtual worlds & Art – Graffiti Playdo
    Place within next generation of worlds like Second Life
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    Image source: http://graffiti.playdo.com/gallery/collage.jpg
  • 144. New trends in social media for art
    Gaming & Art
    Expressing dissent (popular usage of art) in the context of games (What Goes Around video game)
    Anti-war posters in a hacked up/mashed up video game
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    Image source: http://theinspirationroom.com/daily/2009/what-goes-around-comes-around/
  • 145. New technologies
    Mobile Phone
    Integrative in the Web 3.0 machine web
    What are the semantics of text messages, or mobile transactions?
    Useful for last-minute marketing
    Rallying for causes (Red Cross campaign raises $1mil in 24 hours through SMS for Haiti)
    Kindle
    Creates opportunities for mash-up technologies
    Lowers the barrier to entry for publishing – could open up opportunities for writers
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  • 146. Additional ideas? Questions?
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  • 147. useful sites
    http://www.archive.org
    The Wayback Machine
    http://ww.mashable.com
    http://www.turbulence.org
    http://www.blogher.com/arts-organizations-and-artists-2-0-social-media-arts-people
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  • 148. Contact Info
    Anita Garimella
    anita@infinityintlinvestments.com
    Business: 001.215.228.1060
    US - Cell: 001.305.542.0704
    India - Cell: 91.96860.37713
    http://www.linkedin.com/in/anitagarimella