Consumer Connection Training8 April 2003
Our Objectives An introduction to relevant Consumer Connect tools to  generate strong consumer insights Training in some...
Connecting with Consumers
Immersion Helps Discover Multi-Faceted and                   Complex Nature of Consumer Rational  Level                   ...
Two-Way Road Connecting with your consumer requires a two-way  experience/ process influenced by a number of factors    ...
Setting the Scene This will not be a normal conversation    You will ask consumers to talk about things they take for gr...
Setting the Scene                                                            (Continued) Tell them a bit about why you wa...
Setting the Scene                                                            (Continued)When you go to meet your consumer…...
Effective Participatory Observation Active processes    Don’t focus on what you expect to see or hear    Let them give ...
Effective Participatory Observation                                                         (Continued) Listening is more...
Increasing Rapport Body language isn’t just about reading the consumer, it’s  about maximising your contact    Sitting a...
Asking Questions Verbal questioning can be the most powerful tool for  interaction Keep your questions open-ended (an in...
Asking Questions Questions answered with yes or no stop conversations from  flowing -- instead try…  “Tell me more about…...
Other Techniques Projective techniques can provide insight which direct  questioning cannot    e.g., Choice of fragrance...
Using the Consumer ConnectionGuide
Turning Observations intoInsights
Turning Observations into Insights    ‘The real voyage of discovery consists not    in seeking new landscapes… but in havi...
Turning Observations into Insights What is an Insight?      “The capacity to discern underlying truth”      “The power ...
Turning Observations into Insights Observation versus Insight    Observation -- fact about reality    Insight -- a pene...
Turning Observations into InsightsExample 1: Starbucks Observation:    I saw people drinking coffee at all different tim...
Turning Observations into Insights Focus Primarily on HUMAN insights -- try to be more  psychologist than marketer To ge...
Turning Observations into Insights On Wednesday, you’ll bring this journal and your top 4  observations on A4 paper    I...
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Consumer Connection Training by RI

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Consumer Connection Training by RI

  1. 1. Consumer Connection Training8 April 2003
  2. 2. Our Objectives An introduction to relevant Consumer Connect tools to generate strong consumer insights Training in some of the techniques of Consumer Connect - required to make effective “consumer immersions” To provide experience of some Consumer Connect tools An induction in developing the output - that is turning observations into distinctive consumer insights The opportunity to generate actionable insights relevant to current brand strategy – and actively to ideate against these to develop new product concepts, marketing initiatives, etc.. To provide some of the training skills and resources so that participants can go back and disseminate this training 2
  3. 3. Connecting with Consumers
  4. 4. Immersion Helps Discover Multi-Faceted and Complex Nature of Consumer Rational Level Emotional LevelBehavioural level Intuitive Level 4
  5. 5. Two-Way Road Connecting with your consumer requires a two-way experience/ process influenced by a number of factors  Location of contact  Age, gender, ethnicity, social class and life experiences of both of you But you can use skills and tactics to help consumers elicit, describe and communicate their views of the world 5
  6. 6. Setting the Scene This will not be a normal conversation  You will ask consumers to talk about things they take for granted  You will ask consumers to look at things differently  You may ask consumers to question their values, feelings and decisions In order to have the most effective connection, the consumer needs to understand the process clearly and be “enrolled”  Call first, introduce yourself, make them comfortable  Let them know about how long the session will last 6
  7. 7. Setting the Scene (Continued) Tell them a bit about why you want to talk to them - In-home: “I’m doing research on new cleaning materials for the home…”  Don’t disclose who you work for until the end of the Consumer Connection, if at all. Emphasise that you are interested in how they typically act, think and feel (even the things they don’t normally express) Remind them that everything they tell or show you is important -- don’t worry if it seems insignificant 7
  8. 8. Setting the Scene (Continued)When you go to meet your consumer…  We have provided you with a journal containing questions to ask, hints on what to observe, and pages to record your field notes & observations  Use this journal to capture observations, ideas and quotes at the time because it could be hard to remember later  We recommend division of labour between partners - where applicable  Take pictures of anything interesting you see  Buy/ take artefacts…if possible! 8
  9. 9. Effective Participatory Observation Active processes  Don’t focus on what you expect to see or hear  Let them give you stream of consciousness; no need to justify themselves  Co-discovery: ask later what they were doing/thinking so you don’t interrupt the normal action  If you don’t understand, just ask your consumer to explain  Don’t be afraid to check that you are on the same track Avoid some pitfalls when listening and observing  Don’t try to interpret what consumers are “really” saying or doing  Don’t rehearse what you are going to say next  Keep an open mind -- don’t filter out what doesn’t fit with your hypotheses 9
  10. 10. Effective Participatory Observation (Continued) Listening is more than what we hear consumers say  Body language can be metaphor for what is really going on, e.g.:  Arms folded can mean a barrier  Leaning towards you tends to mean interest  Can be incongruent with verbal communication  If so, don’t be afraid to question further 10
  11. 11. Increasing Rapport Body language isn’t just about reading the consumer, it’s about maximising your contact  Sitting at an angle from your consumer is less confrontational than directly opposite  Starting lower than your consumer is less intimidating  Re-adjusting your position will help regain control and create more energy  Mirroring helps with rapport  Eye contact shows that you are interested and focused 11
  12. 12. Asking Questions Verbal questioning can be the most powerful tool for interaction Keep your questions open-ended (an invitation to start talking)  Who? What? Why? When? Where? How?  Seek clarification  Encourage exploration  Seek indication of feeling as well as thought 12
  13. 13. Asking Questions Questions answered with yes or no stop conversations from flowing -- instead try… “Tell me more about…?” “Can you elaborate on that…?” “I’m wondering what you meant by…?” “Because…?” Don’t be afraid of silences… give your consumer time to think about their answers -- plus, you’re just observing a good part of the time! Paraphrasing and summarising facilitates clarity 13
  14. 14. Other Techniques Projective techniques can provide insight which direct questioning cannot  e.g., Choice of fragrance is not based on smell alone but respondents will often try to tell us that it is!  Helps to bring needs alive and taps into emotional relationships -- neither of which are always articulated Examples that you might try include:  Metaphors: My household is is like ______________  Personification: If various types of cleaner were people, what would they be like? 14
  15. 15. Using the Consumer ConnectionGuide
  16. 16. Turning Observations intoInsights
  17. 17. Turning Observations into Insights ‘The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes… but in having new eyes’ Marcel Proust Insights matter because they provide . . .  An elucidating perspective on the consumer’s behaviour or belief that can be leveraged through marketing, advertising, positioning, packaging or product development - to convince him that the brand is meeting his or her needs - rational and emotional  The means to create a bond - the point where a truth of the consumer’s life meets a truth of the brand  This can be applied to products and categories as well as to brands 17
  18. 18. Turning Observations into Insights What is an Insight?  “The capacity to discern underlying truth”  “The power of seeing into and understanding things…”  “...Awareness, often of one’s own mental condition…”  “...An imaginative view into any condition or experience”  Obvious, intuitive when brought to life Statement that gets to heart of why people do what they do and provides knowledge to help us grow business  Describes essential reason(s) underlying series of related observations  Shows deep understanding of needs & motivations, but in simple way – just brings people to life  Drives innovation, is actionable, & on strategy  Requires behaviour that’s open, aware, playful 18
  19. 19. Turning Observations into Insights Observation versus Insight  Observation -- fact about reality  Insight -- a penetrating understanding of fundamental human need underlying/ explaining the observation Later in concept development, the brand/ product benefit will link directly to the insight in order to respond to the consumer need it represents 19
  20. 20. Turning Observations into InsightsExample 1: Starbucks Observation:  I saw people drinking coffee at all different times of the day, not just in the morning Insight:  In a world that is hectic and stressful, people need an opportunity to relax and have a breakExample 2: Volvo Observation:  I experienced people driving dangerously fast with their children in the car Insight:  People want the pleasure and power of driving fast and still feel they are being responsible by protecting their family 20
  21. 21. Turning Observations into Insights Focus Primarily on HUMAN insights -- try to be more psychologist than marketer To get at human insights, think about:  What drives people’s behaviour in cleaning -- or what could be? (e.g., motivation)  Are there any apparent rituals happening -- or could there be? (e.g., experience)  What’s the attitude of consumers while cleaning -- or what could it be? (e.g., feelings)  What emotional fulfillment seems to derive from cleaning -- or what could? (e.g., benefit) 21
  22. 22. Turning Observations into Insights On Wednesday, you’ll bring this journal and your top 4 observations on A4 paper  In your pairs you’ll cluster your observations into themes on the wall  As a group we’ll provide explanations for the various themes  At the end of the first session, we’ll review all the insight platforms we’ve generated and converge down to those that are most interesting  We’ll then work in teams on framing the detail of these insights and think through the marketing/product implications  Finally we will work to produce fully worded new product concepts for a small selection, based directly on the top insights 22
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