A paradigm shift in potato and
sweetpotato research adopting the
agricultural products value chain
(APVC) approach in Keny...
Setting the stage: What are
the key issues to consider?
Current Prediction for
2050
Prediction for
2020
Source: GIS-Unit
CIAT, June 2009
Climate
change
Kenya Agricultural Researc...
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
1990 2000 2010 2020 2030
Percentage of urban population in Kenya by
2030
Production: The yield gap
-1
)
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
Banana Papaya Mango
Reseacher Farmer (A) Farmer (B)
Yield(tha)
Potential...
Harvesting and consistent
delivery of quality, safe and
nutritious products from
FIELD TO PLATE
Field production
Consumpti...
Stakeholder involvement: Progression
of research and feedback loops
Basi
c
Strategi
c
Applie
d
Applie
d
Adaptive
Intensity...
Change of KARI modus operandi
Change from “pushing of commodity” to
“market responsive products”
Production to satisfy the...
Agriculture Product Value Chains:
The re-orientation challenge
The production orientation: The exploitation of
Bio-physica...
Vision 2030 – getting Kenya
into a middle income
economy where
industrialization plays a key
role
Develop technologies tha...
So how is
this done?
1. Review and analysis of the Agricultural Sector sub-sectors
4. Analyzing
priority APVC
3. Prioritization of
selected
pot...
1. Review and analysis of potato
and sweetpotato sub-sectors
Role of roots and tuber crops
Conducted situational analysis ...
2. Identification and selection of
potential APVC
3. Prioritization of selected
potential APVCs
Weighting criteria for Agricultural
Product Value Chains (APVC)
Competitiveness potential (25)
Impact potential (20)
Contr...
Criteria Weight Sub criteria Weight
1.0
Competitiveness
potential
25 1.1 Availability of high market demand,
opportunities...
4.0Opportunities
for intervention
15 4.1 Expressed stakeholder’s demand and their
commitment and willingness to collaborat...
Root and Tuber crops Rank
Sweetpotato (7.33) 1
Cassava (6.70) 2
Potato (6.68) 3
Arrow root (5.68) 4
Kenya Agricultural Res...
4. Analyzing priority APVCs
Sweetpotato value chain
Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
Sweetpotato Value Chain Mapping
Transporters
Specificconsumer
markets
Researchers
Storage providers
Seed, cuttings,
ridgin...
Sweetpotato value chain:
Constraints
Low productivity and poor marketing strategies
Low genetic potential in some varietie...
Sweetpotato value chain:
Opportunities
Virus resistant/tolerant and high yielding
varieties developed by research
Existing...
Potato value chain
Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
Potato Value Chain Map
Technology
promotion
Potato Crop
Production
Potato
Processing
Sale and
Consumption
Transporters (Mi...
Potato Value Chain: Constraints
Limited innovations
Narrow breeding horizon
Narrow germplasm base
Limited integrated pest ...
Potato Value Chain:
Low adoption of innovations and poor
accessibility
Limited adoption of innovations
Inappropriate/weak ...
Potato Value Chain:
Low production and processing
Low production
Inappropriate policy instruments
Limited access to credit...
Potato Value Chain:
Undeveloped markets and limited utilization
Undeveloped markets (Distribution)
Inappropriate policy in...
Development of Innovation
Platforms
Bury the
body
Priest
Mourner
s
Progra
m
Food
Flower
s
Mone
y
Tents
Grave
Transport
Coffin
Catering
PA
syste
m
African fune...
Farmer
Input supplierPolicy
maker
Scientist
Industry
Transporter
Standards
body
Networking amongst
value chain actors
Exte...
Different levels of innovation platforms
Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
34
Expected Outcomes
Drive agriculture forward
Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
THANK YOU
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Sess3 1 dr lusike wasilwa paradigm shifts in potato and sweetpotato research- adapting the agriculture products value chain in kenya

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Sess3 1 dr lusike wasilwa paradigm shifts in potato and sweetpotato research- adapting the agriculture products value chain in kenya

  1. 1. A paradigm shift in potato and sweetpotato research adopting the agricultural products value chain (APVC) approach in Kenya L. Wasilwa, J. A. W. Ochieng, C. Lung’aho, M. Nyongesa, P. J. Ndolo, V. Kirigua and S. P. Omondi Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  2. 2. Setting the stage: What are the key issues to consider?
  3. 3. Current Prediction for 2050 Prediction for 2020 Source: GIS-Unit CIAT, June 2009 Climate change Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  4. 4. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Percentage of urban population in Kenya by 2030
  5. 5. Production: The yield gap -1 ) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Banana Papaya Mango Reseacher Farmer (A) Farmer (B) Yield(tha) Potential yield Actual yield Yield gap Biophysical limitations - Soil fertility - Water - Variety, etc Socio economic and policy limitations - Knowledge - Credit availability - Inputs - Markets Which inputs are lacking? Why inputs are not used? Source – Africa Soils Net, 2009 Experimentation Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  6. 6. Harvesting and consistent delivery of quality, safe and nutritious products from FIELD TO PLATE Field production Consumption Pre-postharvest Narrowing the GAP of postharvest losses Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  7. 7. Stakeholder involvement: Progression of research and feedback loops Basi c Strategi c Applie d Applie d Adaptive Intensityofstakeholderparticipation Time Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  8. 8. Change of KARI modus operandi Change from “pushing of commodity” to “market responsive products” Production to satisfy the needs and preferences of the consumer Position KARI strategically to be a key driver for increasing productivity, commercialization and competitiveness Develop technologies and innovations for demand-driven product value chains Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  9. 9. Agriculture Product Value Chains: The re-orientation challenge The production orientation: The exploitation of Bio-physical capabilities Market (or Selling) orientation: Processes of promoting the consumption of a product that the system is able to produce Marketing orientation: Identifying wants and needs of potential customers, (opportunities) and matching these to potential to do business Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  10. 10. Vision 2030 – getting Kenya into a middle income economy where industrialization plays a key role Develop technologies that fit within the industrialization portfolio e.g. potato or sweetpotato products Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org Shift from production to marketing orientation approach
  11. 11. So how is this done?
  12. 12. 1. Review and analysis of the Agricultural Sector sub-sectors 4. Analyzing priority APVC 3. Prioritization of selected potential APVC 5. Formulating priority APVC upgrading strategy 6. APVC upgrading project proposal development 7. APVC upgrading project proposal review and approval 8. Upgrading project proposal management and reporting 2. Identification and selection of potential APVC Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org Public steps (Programme Coordinators) Stakeholder workshops (Programme Officers) Actors e.g. NPCK, HCDA, KENAPOFA, Kirinyaga Millers, KACE, Supermarkets
  13. 13. 1. Review and analysis of potato and sweetpotato sub-sectors Role of roots and tuber crops Conducted situational analysis and reviewed development objectives Characterized production systems in various ecozones Prioritization of value chains in sub-sectors Analysis of higher level broad sub-sectors challenges, opportunities and interventions Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  14. 14. 2. Identification and selection of potential APVC 3. Prioritization of selected potential APVCs
  15. 15. Weighting criteria for Agricultural Product Value Chains (APVC) Competitiveness potential (25) Impact potential (20) Contribution to agricultural GDP (15) Opportunities for intervention (15) Contribution to quality of environment (15) Social welfare (10) Potential APVCs were selected based on an agreed criteria Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  16. 16. Criteria Weight Sub criteria Weight 1.0 Competitiveness potential 25 1.1 Availability of high market demand, opportunities for growth and existence of industry leadership 10 1.2 Potential for increased commercialization, value addition and product diversification 8 1.3 Potential for competitive advantage in domestic, regional and global markets 7 2.0 Impact potential 20 2.1 Increased employment creation and income generation 9 2.2 Potential for effective and sustainable stakeholder and MSE participation and growth 7 2.3 Potential for effective and sustainable public- private sectors participation and partnership 4 3.0 Contribution to Agricultural GDP 15 3.1 Potential for increased production and productivity 6 3.2 Potential for increasing availability and access to quality and affordable food 5 3.3 Potential for enhancing livelihoods and pro-poor economic growth 4
  17. 17. 4.0Opportunities for intervention 15 4.1 Expressed stakeholder’s demand and their commitment and willingness to collaborate 7 4.2 Existence of challenges and availability of capacity to address them 4 4.3 Relevance and contribution to national and regional development objectives 4 5.0Contribution to quality of environment 15 5.1 Potential for enhancing sustainable utilization of natural resources 6 5.2 Potential for improving conservation and maintenance of biodiversity 5 5.3 Promoting cleaner production and mitigation of climate change and variability 4 6.0Social Welfare 10 6.1 Potential for improving nutrition and health particularly among the poor and marginalized 4 6.2 Potential for encouraging gender equity and equitable distribution of benefits 3 6.3 Capacity to mainstream major cross-cutting issues 3 Total 100 100 Criteria Weight Sub criteria Weight
  18. 18. Root and Tuber crops Rank Sweetpotato (7.33) 1 Cassava (6.70) 2 Potato (6.68) 3 Arrow root (5.68) 4 Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org Value Chain Priority Setting Total score out of 10 Input supply Technology generation and  dissemination Production Processing Distribution Consumption
  19. 19. 4. Analyzing priority APVCs
  20. 20. Sweetpotato value chain Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  21. 21. Sweetpotato Value Chain Mapping Transporters Specificconsumer markets Researchers Storage providers Seed, cuttings, ridging equipment GAPs, harvesting, packaging Transport, financing Transportation Extension providers (public/private) KSU, credit providers Farmers, traders middlemen Farmers Wholesales Farmers Vendors Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org Provision of inputs Production Sale and Consumption Trade DistributionTechnology development Input providers WholesalerFarmers Traders Retailers
  22. 22. Sweetpotato value chain: Constraints Low productivity and poor marketing strategies Low genetic potential in some varieties Some varieties susceptible to insect (weevils) and diseases (viruses) Inadequate access to timely and sufficient quantities of quality planting materials (vines) Low volumes for ‘industrial’ processing although production outstrips consumption, generally Poorly developed product retail market Technologies have not reached many beneficiaries Inadequate articulation between demand and supply Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  23. 23. Sweetpotato value chain: Opportunities Virus resistant/tolerant and high yielding varieties developed by research Existing technologies on multiplication and conservation of clean planting materials Local cottage industries exist for value addition Initiatives for CIGs (Community Interest Groups) formation enhancing marketing Demand growing, with trends in healthy eating habit: (high local market demand for speciality trait varieties, e.g. orange fleshed sweetpotato) Potential markets such as feed industry exist High economic value (KES 6-9 billion) annually and high potential to transform economic well- being of many farmers Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  24. 24. Potato value chain Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  25. 25. Potato Value Chain Map Technology promotion Potato Crop Production Potato Processing Sale and Consumption Transporters (Middlemen / Brokers) Good Agronomic Practice, Harvesting, Ware Trade Storage, Packaging, and Labeling [Consumer Markets] Wholesale & Retail Kiosks Researchers (on various Value Chain aspects) Quality Controllers (KEPHIS) Processors DEEPA, Njoro canner Wholesalers Ukulima market & otherFarmers Traders (Internal & external) Retailers Technology Providers KARI, CIP IARCs Distribution Crisps, fresh & frozen chips Transportation / Re-packaging Farm Inputs provision Transport Processing Fast food chains Other recipes Ware producer Farmers ‘Seed Multiplier’ Farmers Ware Potato’ Farmers Financing Agencies (GoK, Donors,) Germplasm acquisition, variety dev./ testing and promotion/dissemination ‘Demos’ / Info. on Varieties & GAPs Seed, Fertilizers, Soil analysis, Land Prep. Equipment, Pesticides Promoting Agencies: PPPs Input Providers STAK Agro-dealers ,ADC, Germpplasm provision Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  26. 26. Potato Value Chain: Constraints Limited innovations Narrow breeding horizon Narrow germplasm base Limited integrated pest and disease management packages Limited integrated NRM (natural resource management) packages Limited appropriate postharvest technologies Limited crop management packages Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  27. 27. Potato Value Chain: Low adoption of innovations and poor accessibility Limited adoption of innovations Inappropriate/weak technology transfer mechanisms Poor packaging of extension messages Limited accessibility and costly inputs Lack of a robust (viable) seed system Poor land tenure system Limited access to credit High cost /poor quality of farm inputs (fertilizers, pesticides, etc) Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  28. 28. Potato Value Chain: Low production and processing Low production Inappropriate policy instruments Limited access to credit High transaction costs (poor rural access roads) Limited processing Inappropriate policy instruments Bulkiness and perishable nature of potato Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  29. 29. Potato Value Chain: Undeveloped markets and limited utilization Undeveloped markets (Distribution) Inappropriate policy instruments High transaction costs (poor road network) Limited utilization of potato and potato products (Trading) Poor developed (small and segmented) markets Poor road network and scattered farms Limited use of standardized packaging/weighing High transaction costs (poor road network) Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  30. 30. Development of Innovation Platforms
  31. 31. Bury the body Priest Mourner s Progra m Food Flower s Mone y Tents Grave Transport Coffin Catering PA syste m African funeral Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org Committee
  32. 32. Farmer Input supplierPolicy maker Scientist Industry Transporter Standards body Networking amongst value chain actors Extension Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  33. 33. Different levels of innovation platforms Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  34. 34. 34 Expected Outcomes Drive agriculture forward Kenya Agricultural Research Institute www.kari.org
  35. 35. THANK YOU
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