Kenneth Odero: The role of indigenous knowledge in responding to climate change: local-global perspectives
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Kenneth Odero: The role of indigenous knowledge in responding to climate change: local-global perspectives

on

  • 1,288 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,288
Views on SlideShare
1,288
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Kenneth Odero: The role of indigenous knowledge in responding to climate change: local-global perspectives Kenneth Odero: The role of indigenous knowledge in responding to climate change: local-global perspectives Presentation Transcript

  • The Role of Traditional-, Local- and Indigenous-Knowledge in Responding to Climate Change: Local-Global Perspectives
    Dr. Kenneth Odero, Climate XL
    AfricaAdapt Climate Change Symposium
    9-11 March, Addis Ababa
  • Content
    Research problem
    Research objectives
    Approach
    Findings
    Policy implications
  • Research Problem (1/2)
    A
    B
    Photography: Courtesy of The Standard
  • Research Problem (2/2)
    Source: FEWSNET (2010) "A Climate Trend Analysis of Kenya"
  • Research Objectives
    To review relevant risk management strategies employed by Kenyan communities to prepare for, avoid or moderate, and recover from the effects of exposure to anthropogenic and or negative climate change
    Draw policy implications.
  • Approach
    Case studies and
    Documentary analyses of:
    range management based system in Kibwezi;
    tree fodder for livestock system and conservation based agro-forestry system in Embu;
    high value tree crops system in the coastal humid zones;
    soil fertility based agro-forestry system in Maseno;
    species preference among the Olma and Mboni communities of Mpeketoni;
    use of indigenous techniques in the management of pests and diseases among the Tugen; and
    cattle/animal husbandry practices of the Borana community in northern Kenya.
  • Findings (1/3)
    To help cope with the negative impacts of anthropogenic climate change, communities employ traditional-, local- and indigenous-knowledge (TLIK) based practices.
    TLIK includes:
    gender defined knowledge of indigenous plant and animal species, especially drought-tolerant and pest-resistant varieties;
    water harvesting technologies;
    water conservation techniques to improve water retention in fragile soils;
    food preservation techniques such as fermentation, sun drying, use of herbal plants, ash, honey, and smoke to ensure food security;
    seed selection to avoid the risks of drought;
  • Findings (2/3)
    mixed- and or intercropping and diversification;
    soil conservation through no tillage and other techniques;
    use of early warning systems to predict short, medium and long term climate changes;
    transhumance to avoid draught and risk loss of livestock;
    herd accumulation;
    use of supplementary feed for livestock;
    reserving pasture for use by young, sick and lactating animals in case of drought;
    disease control in livestock and grain preservation;
    reserving pasture for use by young, sick and lactating animals in case of drought;
    disease control in livestock and grain preservation;
  • Findings (3/3)
    use of indigenous techniques in the management of pests and diseases;
    culling of weak livestock for food; and
    multi-species composition of herds to survive climate extremes.
    TLIK is the resource that is most readily available to smallholder farmers, pastoralists, fishing communities and forest dwellers to deal with the negative impacts of climate change
    This gender-based knowledge, which has evolved over the last 10,000 years with the domestication of plants and animals is critical for responding to climate change related risks at the local level.
  • Policy Implications
    Adaptation
    Financing -> ODA↓ ↔ Africa’s negotiation position in the UNFCCC
    Technology transfer/technology development, including IPR issues, green economy, etc
    Mitigation – by definition TLIK is sustainable and climate smart
    STI
    Transport, Energy & Housing
    Rural/Agriculture, Land, Water, Forestry
    Gender, Education, Health, etc.