Vegetables and associated best management practices in cereal-based crop production systems to improve income and diets of rural and urban households in northern Ghana and southern Mali
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Vegetables and associated best management practices in cereal-based crop production systems to improve income and diets of rural and urban households in northern Ghana and southern Mali

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Presented by Abdou Tenkouano (AVRDC) at the Africa RISING West Africa Review and Planning Meeting Tamale, Ghana, 23-25 October 2012

Presented by Abdou Tenkouano (AVRDC) at the Africa RISING West Africa Review and Planning Meeting Tamale, Ghana, 23-25 October 2012

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Vegetables and associated best management practices in cereal-based crop production systems to improve income and diets of rural and urban households in northern Ghana and southern Mali Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Vegetables and associated best managementpractices in cereal‐based crop production systems to improve income and diets of rural and urbanhouseholds in northern Ghana and southern Mali Abdou Tenkouano (AVRDC) Africa RISING West Africa Review and Planning Meeting Tamale, Ghana, 23-25 October 2012
  • 2. Implementation strategy (partners) AVRDC is under contract of IITA with functional oversight by IITA for maize-based systems, Africa Rice Center for rice-based systems and ICRISAT for sorghum/millets-based systems Northern Ghana - AVRDC works through CSIR-SARI and UDS with detailed implementation protocols and regular monitoring visits Southern Mali - project implementation unit coordinated by ICRISAT with support from non-project staff posted in Sikasso and NGOs (MOBIOM, PROGEBE, AMASSA)
  • 3. Outcome 1: Sustainable increase of whole-farmproductivityOutput 1.1 Integrated crop and livestock productionsystems developed, evaluated, and effectively delivered toend users Activity 1.1.10: Carry out participatory appraisals on production systems to document existing vegetable varieties, assess relative share of vegetables in production landscape, estimate relative prevalence and performance of vegetable intercropping options [in northern Ghana – maize/rice-legume systems] [in Southern Mali – sorghum systems]
  • 4. Maize/Rice-Legume Systems (Ghana) Survey protocols developed by UDS with AVRDC support (12-13 July 2012) and survey carried from mid-July 2012. Data analysis underway – preliminary report available Balma Yakubu Issaka, Judith Seidu and George Nyarko, University for Development Studies, Faculty of Agriculture, Nyankpala Campus. Tamale Victor Afari-Sefa AVRDC – The World Vegetable Center, Arusha
  • 5. 24% of vegetables harvested in Ghana in 2007 (GLSS, 2008).Northern Ghana Predominantly rain-fed and integrated with major field crops like maize, millet and sorghum. Onion and tomato are exceptions Rain-fed vegetable production is secondary to field crops and undertaken to supplement household income and food. •border crops In the Upper East and Upper West regions •sole crops on small lots for women in the Northern region
  • 6. Northern GhanaEvery household grows atleast, 3 different types ofvegetables - wide varietybut small quantities % Households100 90 80 70 60 50 Maize-vegetable farmers 40 30 20 make an average GHC 122 10 0 per annum from vegetables (about 21.3% of their total revenue)
  • 7. Sorghum-millet Systems (Mali) The survey protocols developed for northern Ghana have been adapted to the southern Mali context Consultancy arrangements are in progress for the surveys to be carried out in October 2012 (a no cost extension was agreed with IITA for this).
  • 8. Outcome 1: Sustainable increase of whole-farmproductivityOutput 1.1 Integrated crop and livestock productionsystems developed, evaluated, and effectively delivered toend users Activity 1.1.14: Introduce, evaluate and promote high value vegetables to improve system productivity in northern Ghana Activity 1.1.11: Introduce, evaluate and promote high value vegetables to improve system productivity in southern Mali
  • 9. Maize/Rice-Legume Systems (Ghana) CSIR-SARI established participatory evaluation and seed bulking plots at Nyankpala and Manga (Navrongo) with more than 80 lines of 10 species received from AVRDC in early June – results in 2-3 months. Site selection for testing in farmers fields at locations chosen by IITA (maize) and AfricaRice (rice) has been completed (12 communities with both maize and rice systems). Mashark Abdulai, CSIR-SARI, Nyankpala. Tamale Albert Rouamba, AVRDC – The World Vegetable Center, Bamako
  • 10. Outcome 1: Sustainable increase of whole-farmproductivityOutput 1.1 Integrated crop and livestock productionsystems developed, evaluated, and effectively delivered toend users Activity 1.1.14: Introduce, evaluate and promote high value vegetables to improve system productivity in northern Ghana Activity 1.1.11: Introduce, evaluate and promote high value vegetables to improve system productivity in southern Mali
  • 11. Sorghum-millet Systems (Mali) Planning meetings held to estimate seed needs for on- farm testing in order to plan seed bulking in Bougouni on 31 May 2012 in Koutiala from 4-6 June 2012 Seeds of one variety each of amaranth, African eggplant, hot pepper, okra, Roselle, sweet pepper, and tomato are under production at Samanko Albert Rouamba, Theresa Endres, Keriba Coulibaly AVRDC – The World Vegetable Center, Bamako
  • 12. Vegetable seed production status in MaliCrops Variety Sowing/Transplantin Area Current growth Expected seed g dates (m²) stage quantities (kg)Amaranth A2002 24 August/N.A. 2205 Vegetative, no 50 flower yetAfrican L10 28 June/31 July 1598 Early fruit ripening 30eggplantHot Nisondia 2 July/6 August 1890 Early fruiting stage 20PepperOkra Sasilon 10 August/N.A. 1890 Early fruiting stage 95Roselle L28 22 August/N.A. 1890 Vegetative, no 40(Hibiscus) flower yetSweet Wassa 20 July/23 August 338 Vegetative, no 2Pepper flower yetTomato Xina 21 June/17 July 1890 Seed drying 4 (3.7 already harvested)
  • 13. Sorghum-millet Systems (Mali) Available seed stocks used to establish farmer-managed participatory trials with NGOs: Bougouni (MOBIOM, 3 cooperatives, 36 farmers, including 15 men and 21 women) Koutiala (PROGEBE, 11 cooperatives, 46 farmers, including 23 men and 23 women)
  • 14. Outcome 4: Increased nutritional and economiclevels of the target population (especially womenand children)Output 4.4. Evidence based dietary strategies for targetpopulation developed, tested and communicated Activity 4.4.2 Carry out participatory appraisals on diets to assess and document existing dietary diversity, assess relative share of vegetables in diets, and estimate nutritional performance of existing dietary options in northern Ghana
  • 15. Maize/Rice-Legume Systems (Ghana) Carried out in conjunction with Activity 1.1.10. Data processing is underway – preliminary report available Promotional food preparations of nightshade and Roselle carried out at Nyankpala.
  • 16. Percentage Households consuming listedvegetables daily or weekly
  • 17. Reason for consuming vegetablesReason for consuming vegetables Frequency PercentageGive blood to the body 41 34.2Boost to the immune system 33 27.5Protects the body against diseases 19 15.8Promote growth and development 15 12.5Provide balanced diet 11 9.2Vegetables make food tasty 1 0.8Total 120 100
  • 18. Outcome 4: Increased nutritional and economiclevels of the target population (especially womenand children)Output 4.4. Evidence based dietary strategies for targetpopulation developed, tested and communicated Activity 4.4.1 Carry out participatory appraisals on diets to assess and document existing dietary diversity, assess relative share of vegetables in diets, and estimate nutritional performance of existing dietary options in southern Mali
  • 19. Sorghum-millet Systems (Mali) Survey protocols developed Consultancy arrangements in progress for the surveys to be carried out in October 2012 Project nutritionist returned to Bamako after precautionary evacuation from mid April to early September
  • 20. Links with other research and development projects USAID Mali (ICRISAT) - “Improving Vegetable Production and Consumption in Mali” - best practice demonstration and dissemination hubs (new varieties, crop management practices and water delivery systems) - Sikasso CORAF (MDTF) - “Enhancing Productivity, Competitiveness and Marketing of Traditional African (Leafy) Vegetables for Improved Income and Nutrition in West and Central Africa“ - first quarter of 2013 in northern Ghana
  • 21. Concluding remarks (Lessons learnt) Cascade approach to partnerships - too complex, particularly on contractual and reporting requirements. Centralized project implementation unit for logistics and contracts (Mali) - an excellent idea, but this could also cause delays - better planning and execution Complementary (Yes), Integrated (Yes), Interdependent (???)
  • 22. Africa Research in Sustainable Intensification for the Next Generation africa-rising.net