• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Africa RISING Monitoring and Evaluation activities in West Africa
 

Africa RISING Monitoring and Evaluation activities in West Africa

on

  • 295 views

Presented by Justice Ajaari, IFPRI at the Africa RISING–CSISA Joint Monitoring and Evaluation Meeting, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 11-13 November 2013

Presented by Justice Ajaari, IFPRI at the Africa RISING–CSISA Joint Monitoring and Evaluation Meeting, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 11-13 November 2013

Statistics

Views

Total Views
295
Views on SlideShare
295
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
8
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Lets have three groups to discuss and brain stormon how to improve data quality within AV over the next three years.
  • Service points Level: The data flow through the M&E system begins with the recording of an encounter between a client (farmers, households, SMEs) and program staff member, a commodity distributed, or a person trained. These data are collected on primary source documents. Examples of primary source documents include: Beneficiaries registers, training registers; and commodity distribution logs.Intermediate level: The data from source documents are aggregated and sent to a higher level. This could be the district or a partnering organization.M &Unit :The M&E unit or central project level does the aggregation from each district or partner ( Fill the PMP or IPTT) .

Africa RISING Monitoring and Evaluation activities in West Africa Africa RISING Monitoring and Evaluation activities in West Africa Presentation Transcript

  • Africa RISING Monitoring and Evaluation activities in West Africa Justice Ajaari, IFPRI Africa RISING–CSISA Joint Monitoring and Evaluation Meeting, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 11-13 November 2013
  • Outline of Presentation o AR-WA Objectives o AR-WA Activities o AR Systems & Sites o Expected Results o M&E Focus o Performance Indicators o Customized Indicators o Data Quality o M&E Reflections
  • AR-WA Objectives oTransform agricultural systems through sustainable intensification (SI) oSI:- producing more (agricultural) output from same area of land, while: • reducing negative environmental impacts • increasing contributions to natural capital and flow of environmental services
  • Activities o o o Diagnosis & design of technology combinations On-farm & on-station trials of new combinations of existing technologies Institutional and/or value chain improvements Systems & Sites o Cereal-based farming systems - Sudano-Sahelian zone of West Africa (WA -AR) o Crop-livestock systems - Ethiopian highlands o Maize-legume-livestock systems - Eastern & Southern Africa
  • Expected Results oSustainable higher productivity oReduced negative environmental impacts oIncreased contributions to natural capital & flow of environmental services oImproved Value chain conduct and performance?? oImproved market efficiency?? oImproved Agric. Extension Effectiveness??
  • oMonitoring Current M&E Focus • Field Visits (Mali & Ghana Field Visits) • USAID Feed the Future Indicators • Customized Indicators o Capacity Building • Mali Partners M&E Workshop (September, 2013) • Ghana Partners M&E Workshop (November, 2013) • Partner Driven Studies-Qualitative Research o Evaluation • Baseline Evaluation-Household/ Community Survey  Ghana-November/December, 2013 & Mali-January/February,2014 • Endline Impact Evaluation (2016)
  • Performance Indicators-FTF/AR o Number of Hectares under improved technologies or management practices as result of USG assistance o Number of Farmers and others who have applied new technologies or management practices as a result of USG assistance o Number of individuals who have received USG Supported short-term agricultural sector or food security training o Number of food security private enterprises (for profit), producer organizations, water users associations, women’s group, trade and business associations and Community-based organization (CBO) receiving USG assistance.
  • AR-WA FTF Indicators-Cont. o Number of Public-Private Partnership Formed as a result of FTF assistance o Number of members of Producer Organizations and Community based Organizations receiving USG assistance o Number of private enterprises (for profit), producers organizations, water users associations, women's groups, trade and business associations, and communitybased organizations (CBOs) that applied new technologies or management practices as a result of USG assistance
  • AR-WA FTF Indicators-Cont. o Number of new technologies or management practices in one of the following phases: • Phase 1: Number of new technologies or management practices under research as a result of USG assistance • Phase 2: Number of new technologies or management practices under field testing as a result of USG assistance • Phase 3 Number of new technologies or management practices made available for transfer as a result of USG assistance
  • Proposed additional FTF indicators for in House Use oNumber of Vulnerable Households Benefiting directly form USG oNumber of individuals who have received USG Supported long-term agricultural sector or food security training
  • Customized indicators oEarly Warning Indicators: • Rainfall • Fuel • Food Prices • Input Costs oAgronomic indicators: • Yield • Pest and disease resistance
  • What Next? What should occur in the next two years to improve M&E
  •  USAID: Data Quality • ADS 203.3.5.1: “To be useful in managing for results and credible for reporting, data need to meet quality standards” • ADS 203.3.5.2: “Purpose of DQA: aware of the extent to which the data integrity can be trusted to influence management decisions”  MCC: • Section 5.4.1- M&E policy: ‘’Good data quality is essential to maintain a high level of confidence in the decisions that are made using the data’’  World Bank: • Data Quality Assessment Framework (DQAF):..” assessing data quality that brings together best practices and internationally accepted concepts and definitions”
  • DATA QUALITY Accuracy, Reliability, Completeness, Precision, Timeliness, Integrity M&E SYSTEM M&E unit • Appropriate data management systems are in place (from lowest to the highest level) • Data Verification to Verify the accuracy of reported data for key indicators • M&E Tools (aggregation at the highest level of a program -PMP) Intermediate aggregation level (District, Region) Implementing Partner Level (Primary Data Source) M&E System
  • Data Quality AR-WA Field Data 1. Accuracy 2. Reliability 3. Completeness 4. Precision 5. Timeliness 6. Integrity M&E System Data should clearly and adequately represent the intended results. Accuracy AR-WA requires that each level of data is aggregated correctly is documented through source data The data are measured and collected consistently. Reliability Completeness AR-WA requires the use of consistent and standardized data collection tools to collect data Completely inclusive: an information system represents the complete list of eligible names and not a fraction of the list. AR-WA requires comprehensive beneficiaries’ level information The data have sufficient detail. Precision AR-WA requires that indicators have standardized definitions and are disaggregated by gender, location and other key variables Data are up-to-date (current), and information is available on time. Timeliness AR-WA requires timely reporting The data are protected from deliberate bias or manipulation for political or personal reasons. Integrity AR-WA requires all datasets to be of the highest integrity and quality
  • M&E Reflections  If you do not measure results, you cannot tell success from failure  If you can not see success, you can not reward it  If you can not reward success, you are probably rewarding failure  If you can not see success, you can not learn from it  If you can not recognize failure, you can not correct it  If you can demonstrate results, you can win public support